Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: watching

Ford, Domino’s Team Up to Deliver Pizza Next Week in Driverless Cars

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, August 30, 2017:  

This coming Monday night someone in Ann Arbor, Michigan — more than likely a student at the University of Michigan — will order a pizza from Domino’s, and the conversation is going be a little different. After confirming the order, the order taker will then ask: “Is it all right if we deliver it driverless?” If the answer is yes, then instructions will be provided about what to do when the Ford Fusion, driverless but containing the pizza, arrives in front. There will be instructions on the side of the car pointing to the back hatch which will open automatically. Inside is the “heatwave” container — large enough for five pizzas and three sides — with a keypad. When the last four digits of the customer’s phone number are punched in, the container opens. That’s it. No fuss, no mess, no tip. Enjoy your pizza and have a nice night.

It will be the first in a series of test runs announced by Ford on Tuesday. Sherif Marakby, who just left Uber in April, has a title that explains everything: He’s the vice president of Autonomous and Electric Vehicles. He stated:

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Connecticut Bill Would Allow Police to Arm Drones

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, March 31, 2017: 

Armed Predator drone firing Hellfire missile

Armed Predator drone firing Hellfire missile

The Connecticut State Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill on Wednesday that would allow local police to weaponize drones. The vote by the Judiciary Committee was 34-7 and the bill’s threats to privacy were downplayed by the committee’s co-chair, Republican John Kissel:

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Trump Surging Into Monday Night’s Debate

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, September 22, 2016:  

English: Donald Trump speaking at CPAC 2011 in...

Nate Silver accurately called the 2008 presidential election outcomes in 49 of the 50 states while in 2012 he did even better: he correctly predicted the winner in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

The blogger at FiveThirtyEight.com, Silver runs the numbers every day. On August 9 Silver calculated that Donald Trump had a 12.3 percent chance of winning the presidency in November compared to an 87.6 percent chance for Hillary Clinton. Less than six weeks later (as this is being written late Wednesday afternoon) Donald Trump now has a 42.7 percent chance of winning versus Hillary Clinton’s 57.2 percent. That’s a 30 percent surge for The Donald and a 30 percent drop for Hillary.

And this despite the Clinton campaign outspending Trump’s by five-to-one: $156.6 million by Clinton compared to just $33.6 million by Trump since the start of the campaign.

Part of Clinton’s problem, of course, is her likeability (of lack thereof) compared to Trump who, according to Republican ad-maker Fred Davis, is

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Minnesota Knife-wielding Attacker Killed by Off-duty Officer

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, September 19, 2016:  

On Saturday night a Somali terrorist with links to ISIS and wearing a security guard uniform entered the Sears store in the Crossroads Center mall in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and began attacking unsuspecting shoppers with a knife. Before the spree ended, he had attacked nine people, asking some of them beforehand if they were Muslims.

Leaving the Sears store, Dahir Adan, whom authorities initially identified only as a former St. Cloud State University student, headed for Macy’s to continue his rampage.

Jason Falconer, an off-duty police officer and owner of Tactical Advantage, a firearms training company, was shopping at Macy’s when he saw Adan heading his way. After identifying himself as a law-enforcement officer, Falconer ordered Adan to the ground. David Unze, a reporter for the St. Cloud Times, took it from there:

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Beware the 300-Pound White Penguin Watching You at the Mall

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, September 5, 2016:  

Cover of "Nineteen Eighty-Four"

In George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Big Brother’s primary enabler was the telescreen. It could be turned down but never turned off, and it recorded all behaviors and conversations to be analyzed for traitorous intent.

Knightscope has no discoverable link to the telescreen with its big, fat white Penguin called K5, but its capabilities are astonishing. Those capabilities came to light following an incident at an upscale mall in Palo Alto last month when a K5 ran over a 16-month-old toddler by mistake. Company officials expressed “horror” at the incident, apologized, and then invited the family of the toddler to view its upgraded version of K5, which, it promised, would avoid such incidents in the future.

The rollout of K5 (version 2.0, if you will) was no doubt impressive, as K5 has an amazing array of technology designed as “an advanced anomaly detection device” – read: detect, record, analyze, and then inform its handler of suspicious activities taking place nearby. Stacy Dean Stephens, Knightscope’s vice president of marketing told Digital Trends:

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IMF’s Toolkit Inadequate for Next Housing Bubble, Official Admits

 

Bubbles.

This article was first published at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, June 16, 2014:

Last month, the Financial Times saw what’s coming: Housing prices rose last year at the fastest rate since 1995, setting the stage for the next global bust. Eleven countries they were watching had year-over-year rises in double digits, adding:

Even Germany, known for its stable housing market, is prompting concern, with the Bundesbank warning that valuations are as much as 25 percent too high in [some] big cities.

It admitted great concern that regulators won’t be able to do anything about it, either, just like last time:

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Backpacks, Pressure Cookers and Baloney

When Michele Catalano blogged yesterday using the title “Pressure Cookers, backpacks and quinoa, oh my!” it didn’t gain purchase until it was picked up by the Guardian. From there the story jumped to The Atlantic which, 24 hours later, had more than a third of a million views.

Catalano used to be the music editor for Forbes but now

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NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly on Inside Track to replace DHS Napolitano

Within hours of Janet Napolitano’s announcement of her resignation as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security names of people to replace her surfaced, but none with the credentials of NYPD Commission Raymond Kelly. Or the political connections. Said Senator Charles Schumer:

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Staying private in a public world

The new rule is: once you express a thought, it’s public. So far, NSA isn’t able to monitor our thinking, but the moment we express ourselves, someone’s watching and taking notes.

So what is to be done? I’ve been waiting for someone to come up with some answers, and I’ve found him:

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Boston Bombing Investigation Reveals Government Surveillance of Phone Calls

Sari Horwitz, a writer from the Washington Post reporting on the investigation of Katherine Russell, the wife of the deceased Boston bomber, inadvertently wrote that federal officials had access to the content of phone calls she tried to make to her husband when she learned of his involvement in the incident. Buried inside the fifth paragraph of her report was this:

Officials said that Russell called her husband when she saw his photograph on television – following the FBI’s release of the pictures of the suspects…

Almost immediately Erin Burnett, the host of CNN’s Outfront, wanted to know how the government knew. Aren’t phone calls supposed to be private? She interviewed Tim Clemente, a former FBI counterterrorism agent on May 1st, asking:

Is there any way … they [the federal investigators] can try to get the phone companies to give that up … It’s not a voice mail. It’s just a conversation. There’s no way they can actually find out what [was said on the call], right, unless she tells them?

Clemente:  There is a way. We certainly have ways in national security investigations to find out exactly what was said in that conversation. It’s not necessarily something that the FBI is going to want to present in court, but it may help lead the investigation … we certainly can find that out.

Burnett: So they can actually get that? … that is incredible.

Clemente: Welcome to America. All of that stuff is being captured as we speak, whether we know it or like it, or not.

Glenn Greenwald, writing in The Guardian, explained just what kind of “stuff” the FBI is able to track: “all digital communications – meaning phone calls, emails, online chats and the like – are automatically recorded and stored and [are] accessible to the government after the fact. To describe that is to define what a ubiquitous, limitless Surveillance State is.”

Greenwald pointed to the experience of Mark Klein, covered by The Washington Post back in 2007, when he was working as an AT&T technician in San Francisco in 2002. He was interrupted by an agent from the National Security Agency (NSA) who then introduced Klein to the system the NSA was setting up to “vacuum up internet and phone call data from ordinary Americans” with the help of AT&T. The article explained:

 [Klein] said the NSA built a special room to receive data streamed through an AT&T Internet room containing “peering links,” or major connections to other telecom providers. The largest of the links delivered 2.5 gigabits of data — the equivalent of one-quarter of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s text — per second…

When Klein saw what was happening, it was his “aha moment. They’re sending the entire Internet to the secret room!” Using a glass prism that divided the information into two pieces, the NSA could monitor every bit of data going across the internet without impeding its flow:

This splitter was sweeping up everything, vacuum-cleaner style. The NSA is getting everything. These are major pipes that carry not just AT&T’s customers but everybody’s.

I flipped out. They’re copying the whole Internet! There’s no selection going on here. Maybe they select out later, but at the point of handoff to the government, they get everything.

In April of last year, an NSA whistleblower, William Binney, was interviewed by Juan Gonzalez and Amy Goodman at Democracy Now, and revealed just how extensive the data collection is and how it is justified. Binney said that Section 215 of the Patriot Act

 gives them license to take all commercially held data about us…

 [This] is extremely dangerous because if you take that and put it into forms of graphing … and then watch it over time, you can build up knowledge about everyone in the country.

And having that knowledge then allows them ability to concoct all kinds of charges, if they want to target you.

When asked about how much information is already stored, Binney responded: “I would suggest that they’ve assembled on the order of 20 trillion transactions about U.S. citizens.”

And where is that information being stored? Bluffdale, Utah. Said Binney: “[The Utah Data Center located at Bluffdale, Utah] is a very large storage device, actually, for remote interrogation and remote processing. That’s the way I view that. Because there’s not enough people there to actually work the data there, so it’s being worked somewhere else.”

The facility in Utah will exceed 1 million square feet, nearly six times the size of a Walmart Supercenter, and will be able, when it is completed in September, to capture “all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails: parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter,’” according to James Bamford, author of The Shadow Factory.

An associate of Bamford’s, Jeff Wright, author of The Citizen’s Last Stand, noted in his book:

James Bamford, a New York Times bestselling author, has detailed some of the NSA’s … capabilities…

Bamford actually began his career during the Viet Nam War as an administrative tech in the same place I did, the Naval Security Group. His first book [The Puzzle Palace] freaked-out the core leadership at the Agency. In actuality, it barely scratched the surface.

In an interview with The New American, Wright added:

This capability [to capture all digital information on Americans] has existed for quite some time…

I have seen the access points at several major carrier facilities…

It started during the Cold War as a program named “HYDRA.” It has morphed … since then. The facilities, such as at Bluffdale, Utah, will allow real-time analysis.

Naturally, the NSA denies all of this. On April 15th, the agency issued a statement denying that it will eavesdrop on innocent citizens:

Many unfounded allegations have been made about the planned activities of the Utah Data Center…one of the biggest misconceptions about NSA is that we are unlawfully listening in on, or reading emails of, U.S. citizens. This is simply not the case.

There’s a rule about power and restraint of that power: “If they can, they will.” Since they can, they are. Now there’s a new rule: “Watch what you say. Somewhere, someone out there is listening.” Just ask Katherine Russell.

 

 

 

 

Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.
Copyright © 2018 Bob Adelmann