Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Category Archives: Inflation

Wholesale Prices Drop in June; Economists Confounded

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, July 10, 2020: 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) announced on Friday that wholesale prices dropped by 0.2 percent in June. Economists were expecting an increase of 0.4 percent.

Confounding those economists further, wholesale prices have dropped by nearly one full percentage point over the last year. Common sense says that when the supply of money and currency increases, price increases are sure to follow.

And the money supply has certainly been increasing.

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Consumer Spending Rebounds a Record Eight Percent in May

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, June 26, 2020:

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reported on Friday that consumer spending jumped to a new record in May: 8.1 percent over April, more than double the all-time high ever recorded since the bureau started keeping track of such things in 1959.

Consumers, locked away owing to government mandates in response to the COVID virus, headed for auto showrooms and big box stores to celebrate their new freedom in May.

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Stock Market Rallies Despite Negative News

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, June 4, 2020:

The small-cap Nasdaq 100 Index has rallied more than 43 percent since its low set on March 23. The S&P 500 Index has posted its largest 50-day rally in history. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has gained 7,600 points.

With all that is going on in the country and the world, how is that possible? The national riots, the confrontation with China building over Hong Kong, and the deaths continuing to mount as a result of the coronavirus, would all seem to be negatives on the market, driving investors away.

But, no. Investors aren’t looking out the back window, but instead are looking out the front. And they are increasingly seeing what they want to see and hope to see: a recovery that justifies their decision to invest in companies that appear likely to benefit and profit from it.

The president is perhaps the most well-informed individual on the planet. On May 29 he said, “We’re going to have a great third quarter, a great fourth quarter. I think next year is going to be one of our better years.”

There are trillions of dollars just itching to hear such confidence coming from the president. During the lockdown, consumers hunkered down and hoarded many things — toilet paper, canned goods, cleaning supplies, and cash. The savings rate, which is normally around five percent of personal incomes, soared to 12.7 per cent March and then to 33 percent in April. As a result, economists are expecting a virtual tsunami of consumer spending to occur once the economy is fully open.

And the economy is already opening.

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Consumer, Producer Prices Plunge in April

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, May 14, 2020:  

Wholesale prices dropped by 1.3 percent in April, the sharpest decline since the Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics has been tracking them dating back to December 2009. This followed a decline of 0.2 percent in March.

The report followed the Labor Department’s announcement on Tuesday that consumer prices dropped by the most since the Great Recession of 2007-2009.

The decline is blamed largely on the collapse in gasoline prices, which have dropped by nearly 60 percent over the last two months. Food prices also declined during the month, along with declines in prices of apparel and airline tickets.

But is that the real reason? It’s easy to be lulled into thinking that the shutdown of the economy is the primary cause: People aren’t driving or flying or eating out. Therefore demand is down, which is followed by declining prices.

Simple. Easy. And wrong.

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Consumer Prices in March Fall by the Most in Five Years

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Good Friday, April 10, 2020:

The summary of how consumer prices behaved in March, released on Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, noted that its index registered “the largest monthly drop since January, 2015.” The 0.4 percent drop in March is equivalent to a five-percent decrease in prices at the consumer level for a year.

Its Consumer Price Index (CPI) was pushed down mostly by the price of gasoline, which fell by 10 percent in March. This reflected the virtual collapse in crude oil prices, which dropped more than 30 percent last month.

Apparel prices also were down, along with new car prices, reflecting an absence of buyers in retail outlets and showrooms, thanks to the coronavirus shutdown.

When pressed on the matter, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell (head of the machinery that is responsible for increasing the money supply) said

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.
Copyright © 2020 Bob Adelmann