This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, November 4, 2019:

Somehow Oklahoma City Democratic representative Jason Lowe didn’t get the
memo – or, if he did, he’s ignoring it: Oklahomans want full enjoyment of
their God-given rights guaranteed by the Second Amendment. Simply put,
those citizens want to make their own decisions on when to carry a firearm
for their own protection, and where. They don’t think they should have to
request permission from the government to exercise their rights.

In his first official act as Oklahoma’s new governor, Kevin Stitt signed a
“constitutional carry” bill into law earlier this year that had been
overwhelmingly approved by both the House (70-30) and the Senate (40-6).
The previous governor had vetoed a similar bill.

Lowe pushed back against Stitt’s approval of the bill. Working with Moms
Demand Freedom, a group that shares Lowe’s unhappiness over citizens
exercising those rights without government permission, Lowe tried to gin up
excitement and enthusiasm for a petition to let voters second-guess the
state’s elected officials’ decision on the matter of “constitutional
carry.” However, his petition failed to gather the minimum number of
signatures required to put it on the ballot.

So he tried a last-minute strategy: demanding a stay of the law by a local
judge. The judge ruled against Lowe. Lowe appealed. And the state’s Supreme
Court upheld the ruling.

Between 250 and 300 Oklahoma gun owners joined with Oklahoma’s Second
Amendment Association in celebrating the state’s newly-minted
“Constitutional Carry” law – carrying in public without government
permission – in front of the state capitol in Oklahoma City on Friday.

State Senator Nathan Dahm, the author of the bill that had previously been
vetoed by former Governor Mary Fallin, exulted:

It’s a great day and a historic day. Throughout this process we faced
committee chairmen who refused to hear a bill to restore our constitutional
rights, or a Republican governor who broke her word, violated a campaign
promise and vetoed the right of law-abiding citizens to keep and bear
arms…

 

Today we celebrate being victorious.

Oklahoma joins 16 other states with similar “constitutional carry” or
“permitless carry” laws: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Maine,
Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia,
Wyoming, New Hampshire, Montana, and Kentucky.

An outline of the state’s gun laws reveals just how free its citizens are
to exercise their Second Amendment rights:

Does the state require a permit to purchase a firearm? No

 

Does the state require firearms to be registered with the state? No

 

Is there an “assault weapon” law on the books in Oklahoma? No

 

Does the owner of a firearm need to be licensed? No

 

Does he need a concealed carry permit to carry? No

 

Does he need a permit to carry openly? No

 

Are background checks required for private, person-to-person sales? No

There are limits, however, indicating that there is still more work to be
done. While the state’s preemption law prohibits local municipalities from
enacting gun laws that are more restrictive than the state’s, open or
concealed carry is not allowed on college campuses. It remains illegal for
gun owners to carry into public sporting events or casinos, although they
are now free to carry at public parks and zoos. Property owners remain free
to prohibit carrying if they so choose. The law also bans anyone in the
state illegally or those convicted of certain crimes from enjoying the
benefits of the new law.

The new law extends to visitors to the state as well, said state Senator
Kim David: “We allow for people in other states to be able to carry in this
state without a permit. This bill simply allows law-abiding citizens who
wish to carry a weapon to be able to do that in our state without … a
permit.”

With passage of the new law, Oklahoma will likely enjoy another benefit:
lower homicide rates. According to data from the FBI, Arizona – which
adopted “constitutional carry” in 2010 – saw its homicide rates decline
from 6.4 per 100,000 to 5.1 by 2018. Mississippi – which adopted a similar
law in 2016 – saw its homicide rates fall to the lowest numbers seen in
decades. Three of the four states with the lowest murder rates in 2018 are
“constitutional carry” states.

Perhaps now Jason Lowe will have gotten the memo, and direct his attention
away from trying to infringe on Oklahomans’ precious rights. 

Opt In Image
Soak Up More Light from the Right
with a free copy of Bob's most popular eBook!

Sign up to to receive Bob's explosive articles in your inbox every week, and as a thank you we'll send a copy of his most popular eBook - completely free of charge!

How can you help stop the Democrat's latest gun grab? How is the Federal Reserve deceiving America today? What is the latest Obama administration scandal coverup? Sign up for the Light from the Right email newsletter and help stop the progressives' takeover of America!