Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: YouTube

Free Market Alternatives to Obamacare Already Exist

More than a year ago, Dr. Barbara Bellar, a medical doctor with a JD degree, was running for office as an Illinois State Senator, and provided a sound byte that continues to reverberate across the internet, having been viewed as of this writing some 3,675,000 times. The clip lasts less than two minutes, including laughter and applause from her audience, to whom she said:

So let me get this straight. This is a long sentence:

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The US economy is vastly larger than we know

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, December 4th, 2013:

For the past 25 years, Austrian school economist Mark Skousen, nephew of W. Cleon Skousen (author of The 5000 Year Leap), has been trying to get the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) to count the rest of the economy that the GDP doesn’t measure. In April, the BEA will start reporting the GO

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The newly updated GDP – the GO – still won’t capture all of the US economy

Austrian school economist Mark Skousen has labored mightily for a quarter of a century to persuade the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) to publish a better measure of economic activity in the United States, and, beginning in April, the BEA will start publishing the country’s

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Despite Big Push by Obama, Support for Syrian Attack Dwindles

Secretary of State John Kerry, following his meetings with more than two dozen European foreign ministers on Saturday in Lithuania, insisted that his efforts were successful in generating support for President Obama’s planned attack on Syria. But none of it endorsed military action but only that

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Bezos and Henry May Have Overpaid for the Post and the Globe

This article was first published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, August 7th, 2013:

With the announcements of the sale of the Boston Globe to Boston billionaire John Henry for a paltry $70 million and the sale of the Washington Post to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos for $250 million, some are asking if they might have overpaid.

The Globe sale was called, appropriately, a

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Declines in Trust and Revenues Force Sales and Spinoffs of Formerly Prominent Newspapers

The back-to-back announcements of the sale of the Boston Globe to Boston billionaire John Henry and the sale of the Washington Post o Amazon founder Jeff Bezos earlier this week continue to track the shrinkage of the newspaper business that has been going on for more than a decade. Henry bought the Globe from the New York Times for just $70 million, a fraction of the

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Answers to Lies about Fracking

This article was first published at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, July 8th 2013:

Ronald Bailey, who has specialized in exposing myths in the field of biotechnology for years, took great joy in exposing some popular myths about fracking over at Reason magazine where he writes a weekly science and technology column.

Bailey is best known for his book “Global Warming and Other Eco Myths” which exploded some popular myths, such as:

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Chicago Sun-Times Photographer Shocked – Shocked! – About Being Laid Off

This article first appeared in the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor newsletter:

 

Steve Buyansky, who was, until last Thursday, a professional photographer for three of Sun-Times Media’s 39 suburban papers, said he was surprised when he was asked to turn in his magnetic employee badge and his photographic equipment: “I’m still in shock. I’m not angry right now. Maybe I will be later.”

On what planet has Buyansky been living? How could he not know what was happening in front of his very eyes? Sun-Times Media hasn’t been profitable for years. It filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2009. Where was Buyansky while that was going on? When the group was bought by Wrapports LLC in 2011, salaries were cut by 15 percent, the pension plan went from defined-benefit to defined-contribution, and seniority rights regarding layoffs were ended. Where was Buyansky then?

In March, the Sun-Times fired several editors and staff members for several of its suburban papers, and consolidated operations of those papers to its downtown location to save money. It had fallen behind in making its monthly payments for the Chicago Tribune which was printing its papers after the Sun-Times shut down its own printing facilities.

The paid circulation base for the Chicago Sun-Times has been shrinking, having lost 25 percent in just the last six years. In its announcement last week, the media group said:

The Sun-Times business is changing rapidly and our audiences are consistently seeking more video content with their news. We have made great progress in meeting this demand and are focused on bolstering our reporting capabilities with video and other multimedia elements.

The Chicago Sun-Times continues to evolve with our digitally savvy customers, and as a result, we have had to restructure the way we manage multimedia, including photography, across the network.

Wrapports thinks there’s still some life in the dinosaur. It’s an investment group made up of Michael Ferro of Merrick Ventures, Timothy Knight (former publisher of Newsday, another newspaper struggling to be profitable), and three other private equity or venture capital firms. They have seen the handwriting on the wall for years. Why hasn’t Buyansky?

The new strategy is to allow, no, require, their remaining news reporters to use their iPhones to take pictures to supplement their articles! What a concept! Talk about being late to the party! Last week it was announced that Facebook gets 208,300 photos uploaded every minute, along with 100 hours of video onto YouTube! Yahoo estimates that next year 880 billion photos will be taken and downloaded somewhere on the Internet.

Efforts to regain profitability have so far come up short. In February Sun-Times launched an online video news program, a 90-second flash news segment. That effort ended in May.

Also in February the paper launched Grid, a Sunday business news magazine that was just ended last month.

Life magazine’s domination of the all-photographic news magazine niche ended in 1972. Efforts to resuscitate the brand failed, and Life published its last issue in April, 2007 – six years ago. Look magazine died in 1972, and no one even tried to resuscitate it. Wasn’t Buyansky aware of that?

Or what about the reality check written by professional photographer Talbert McMullin last summer, entitled “Professional Photography is Going Away?” McMullin saw what’s been happening for years:

My little Panasonic point-and-shoot will take hundreds and hundreds of photos one after another on a single memory card, and it rivals the quality of my Nikon SLRs! That is an amateur photographer’s dream, but unfortunately it is not as beneficial for the pros. Suddenly, the playing field is level for everyone. Technology has not yet put pros out of business, but it is setting the stage – even our mobile phones have cameras!

Professional photography is going away. That’s right, going away. I can’t say it is going to happen today, next week, next month, or even next year, but at some point in the future it will. Fact: The transition has begun. You cannot change it; you can only adapt. Before you wet your pants, please notice I did not say all photography is going away, only professional photography. Ignore or distort the facts at your own peril!

Some professionals will thrive, but the rest will be left behind. The number of successes will continue to shrink until the professional photographer becomes … an anomaly.

What did Buyansky do when he was suddenly informed that his skills as a professional photographer were no longer needed? He joined 10 other equally surprised former photographers from the Sun-Times at the Billy Goat Tavern, a local watering-hole for journos, and celebrated the glory days long past, saying “The Sun-Times had an amazing photo staff.”

The emphasis was on the word “had.”

—————————

Sources:

Chicago Sun-Times Lays Off All Its Full-Time Photographers

Chicago Sun-Times lays off all photographers

Chicago Sun-Times lays off its photo staff

Chicago Sun-Times fires all staff photographers

Reality Check: Professional Photography Is Going Away

How Many Photos Are Uploaded to The Internet Every Minute?

An Editorial: Is the Internet a Photographer’s Friend or Foe?

Look magazine

Life magazine

Wrapports

Newsday

Disingenuous Democrats in Denver Claim Victory in Gun Wars

When three Democrats said they were going to side with Republicans on two of the gun bills being debated in Denver, the Democrats pulled them, claiming victory. By pulling the bills that would have included a gun ban on campuses and another holding firearms owners liable for damages, Democrats claimed victory over those that were left: a restriction on ammunition magazine limits, and universal background checks.

Nothing was said about the Constitutional right to bear arms in Section 13 of the state Constitution, which, just for the record says:

The right of no person to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person  and property … shall  be called in question…

and precious little had to do with logic. Instead it was all about feelings. Senate President John Morse (D-Colorado Springs)led the way:

Cleansing a sickness from our souls doesn’t come easy.

Mike Johnston (D-Denver) claimed these were “policy” questions, not constitutional ones:

What is before us is not a constitutional question but a policy question.

Mary Hodge (D-Adams County) said:

This bill is merely an attempt to reduce the slaughter.

But Ted Harvey (D-South Denver) took the prize. [Note: please see comments at the end of this article] When Amanda Collins said that if she had had a gun she would have been able to repel an attacker who raped her, Harvey replied:

What we’re trying to do here tonight is not protect ourselves from violent crime … but to protect students and teachers from feeling uncomfortable by you carrying a gun to protect yourself. (emphasis added)

I’m not making this up. You can click this link which will take you to a YouTube video of Harvey’s “explanation” – you’ll find it at the 1:30 point in the video.

Even Governor Hickenlooper is drinking from the same glass, claiming with a straight face that he supports all of the bills and will sign any that reach his desk, but

I’m not in any way an anti-gun person.

That’s really good to know, Governor, as guns don’t have feelings and we certainly wouldn’t want them to be offended, would we?

Note: Readers have asked me to review the Harvey video again, suggesting that I was misreading Harvey’s comments. I have done so and have concluded that I have done the man a disservice in making it appear that he was expressing his opinion about feelings when he was in fact apologizing to Amanda for others in the legislature who were more concerned about their constituents’ feelings than about her right to self defense. For that I apologize.

However, the intent of the article remains intact. Logic is rarely involved by those in the anti-gun camp. History means little to them. Well-founded arguments presented in opposition to their position are ignored, or ridiculed. Feelings are how they govern.

 

 

Watch for FrackNation on AXS.tv

As a response to Promised Land and Gasland, two scurrilous movies about the alleged dangers of fracking for natural gas, one of which I reviewed here, FrackNation was developed. It’s producer, Phelim McAleer, got annoyed with the obvious slant of these two movies, and

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VIDEO: What Free Market Health Care Looks Like

Like cosmetic surgery, or veterinarian services. Cato scholar Daniel Mitchell has found a video, 6 minutes long, that explains how surgeons are publishing their prices online so people can make more intelligent choices. It’s worth viewing:

He says it’s so powerful that he now refers skeptics to it rather than get into a long intellectual defense of the free market with them. And he says we should go and do likewise: “You should share this post with any and all fuzzy-headed friends and colleagues and tell them this is how smoothly the market would work if the government would simply get out of the way.”

Dr. Keith Smith, an anesthesiologist, co-founded the Surgery Center of Oklahoma, and decided to publish his rates online. For example, the center charges just $2,750 for a carpal tunnel syndrome surgery instead of some $7,400 charged by local hospitals. When a person is spending their own money, or using their HSA, they make better decisions. What a concept!

They’ve been posting their schedules online for three years. For June Wiskowski, using the local hospital would have cost her about $5,000 out of her pocket. But using the Surgery Center instead, she is able to use her HSA instead, meaning no out-of-pocket costs to her.

Conclusion: it is possible to offer high quality health care at – ready? – competitive free-market prices!

I liken the free market solution to providing health care to how we buy veterinarian services. Mary and I have a great dog, a LabraDoodle named Happy (which she is!). When she gets an ear infection, Mary takes her to the vet. The vet not only prescribes the medicine, but sells it to her while she is there – no waiting, no standing in line at the drug store, no “discount” cards, no prescription cards under Medicare. The vet gives her the bill which she pays when she leaves. Period. End of transaction.

Lord help us if the government ever decides that health care for pets is a human right that needs to be provided for by the government!

6 Reasons to Never Talk to Police

This is the first time that I am giving you a link to a 45-minute long video with the strong recommendation that you take the time to view it. He’s a lawyer, a former district attorney, who gives you eight reasons why it’s never in our best interests to speak with the police.

Here are two of them:

  1. There is no way it can help
    1. You can’t ever talk your way out of getting arrested…ever.
    2. You can’t give them any information that will help you at trial.
    3. What you say is considered hearsay and cannot be used in your defense, but it can be used against you.
  2. If you are not guilty you my inadvertently admit your guilt by mistake. And if you are guilty,
    1. What’s the hurry in admitting it?
    2. In federal court 86% of all defendants plead guilty at some point before trial anyway.
    3. Your statement to the policy may, due to outside circumstances, become inadmissible before the trial begins.

So, what do you say in a traffic stop or following an accident and you’re asked a question?: “I’m sorry, officer, but I have been instructed by legal counsel to remain silent.”

Still not persuaded? Here’s the link again for the other six reasons to be quiet.

Libya Coverup Pours Gasoline on Obama’s Funeral Pyre

President Barack Obama and Vice President Jose...

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Judge Andrew Napolitano has, bless his soul, added to our understanding of what happened in Libya on September 11th. And it adds considerably to the evidence that Obama is corrupt, and that he has surrounded himself with similar types.

Initially Obama (his state department, intelligence network, etc.) blamed the attack on our ambassador and the other three staffers who were murdered on a group of unruly, undisciplined thugs who were upset over the showing of a YouTube video about their prophet Mohammed.

This was a deliberate coverup, says Napolitano:

The clip shows actors in dubbed voices portraying the prophet Mohammed and  others in an unflattering light. The Obama  administration seized upon the temporary prevalence of this clip to explain the assault on the consulate. Indeed, the administration sent U.N.  Ambassador Susan Rice to represent it on five  Sunday morning TV talk shows on September 16th, to make the claim that the  attack on the consulate was a spontaneous  reaction to the YouTube clip, that it could not  have been anticipated, and that the perpetrators were ordinary Libyans angry at  the freedom moviemakers in America enjoy.

Soon, U.S. intelligence reports were  leaked that revealed that the intelligence community knew the attack was not as  described by Ms. Rice…

The Obama administration has publicly  rejected the intelligence leaks and insisted as recently as last week during the  vice presidential debate that “we” did not know the assault was an act of  terrorism against American personnel and property.

The “we” was uttered by the imbecile Biden, and rejected by

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Aurora Shooting: Questions Still Remain

Tad Cronn says, “There are conspiracy theories, and there are conspiracy theories,” concerning the Aurora shooting that took place in Aurora, Colorado, last Friday night. “But some conspiracy theories have just enough meat on them to make you go ‘hmm.’”

Writing at Godfather Politics, Cronn reviewed the key questions still being raised about James Holmes’ rampage, including the “exquisite” timing of the incident. It could have something to do with the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty that is being debated in New York this week. Cronn is impressed with the coincidence of the Aurora attack and suggests similarities to the Fast and Furious operation that put U.S. weapons into the hands of Central American drug cartels. Says Cronn,

There is powerful evidence to suggest that the real plan [for Fast and Furious] was to have drug runners wreak havoc here at home with our guns, as they have, and [then] use that “discovery” as leverage for further gun controls.

The same theory applies to using Aurora as leverage to pass the U.N. treaty.

Cronn also raised a number of other issues without answers, including Holmes’ demeanor following the incident when he gave up to the police without a struggle and then warned them that he had booby-trapped his apartment. Holmes was a penurious student, without the obvious means to

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Ron Paul Has the Final Say

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 29:  Republican pres...

In his last public opportunity to quiz Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, who appeared before the House Financial Services Committee on July 18, Texas Congressman and Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul took the time to put things into perspective:

For the past few years the Federal Reserve System has received criticism from all sides of the political spectrum, and rightly so, for its unprecedented intervention into the economy and its bailouts of large Wall Street banks and foreign central banks.

This has been Paul’s theme ever since he entered Congress following a special election in April 1976. In a position paper that his staff prepared in June of 1976, Paul attacked a pending bill in Congress to fund the International Monetary Fund following the breakdown of the Bretton Woods agreement when President Nixon took the dollar off the gold standard in 1971.

The staffer primarily responsible for that paper, Gary North, remembers starting work on Friday, June 11, 1976, and being given the task of preparing the paper in time for the Monday deadline. He worked all weekend on it, and when it was published, it made such an impression on Senator William Proxmire, then chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, that he invited Paul to testify before his committee. Says North: “At the time, I had never heard of a House member testifying to a Senate Committee. I have never heard of it since.”

But that testimony launched a three-decades-long campaign by that lone congressman to question the existing monetary system, especially the centerpiece of that system, the Federal Reserve.

In his July 18 testimony, Paul recalled his primary problem with the IMF—the same problem he has with the Fed—is that it is a central bank that was deliberately designed to

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President Obama Pokes the Supreme Court … Again

First Floor at the Statute of John Marshall in...

President Obama, commenting on the judicial review being undertaken by the Supreme Court on his premier signature legislation, ObamaCare, challenged the court to uphold his law or be considered “activists” legislating from the bench. Said the President:

Ultimately, I’m confident that the Supreme Court will not take what would be an unprecedented, extraordinary step of overturning a law that was passed by a strong majority of a democratically elected Congress. I guess I would remind conservative commentators that for years what we’ve heard is the biggest problem on the bench is judicial activism or a lack of judicial restraint. For an unelected group of people to somehow overturn a duly constituted and passed law is a good example of that, and I’m pretty sure this court will recognize that and not take that step.

This isn’t the first time the President has directed barbs at the Supreme Court. During his State of the Union address two years ago he looked down on the Justices seated below him and said their recent decision on Citizens United opened the “floodgates” to unlimited independent election spending.

This time the President’s use of the words “unprecedented,” “extraordinary” and “unelected” elicited howls of protest from observers such as Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), who responded that “It would be nice living in a fantasy world where every law you like is constitutional and every Supreme Court decision you don’t like is ‘activist.’ ” Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) joined in, saying he was “disappointed” by the President’s warning:

It is not unprecedented at all for the Supreme Court to declare a law unconstitutional; they do that on a regular basis, so it’s not unprecedented at all.

What is unprecedented is…the president of the United States trying to intimidate the Supreme Court.

Even the Wall Street Journal excoriated the President over his remarks, chiding him that he “needs a remedial course in judicial review.” How could the President, allegedly a constitutional scholar and professor at the University of Chicago and president of the Harvard Law Review, not remember the pivotal case, Marbury v. Madison, decided 209 years ago and considered as perhaps the singular landmark case in the history of law? That case helped define the constitutional boundaries between the Executive and Judicial branches of the fledgling republic and was the first time in Western history that a court invalidated a law by declaring it to be unconstitutional. As noted by the Journal:

In Marbury in 1803, Chief Justice John Marshall laid down the doctrine of judicial review. In the 209 years since, the Supreme Court has invalidated part or all of countless laws on grounds that they violated the Constitution. All of those laws were passed by a “democratically elected” legislature of some kind, either Congress or in one of the states. And no doubt many of them were passed by “strong” majorities.

The decision specifically ruled that “Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 is unconstitutional to the extent it purports to enlarge the original jurisdiction of the Supreme Court beyond that permitted by the Constitution. Congress cannot pass laws that are contrary to the Constitution, and it is the role of the Judicial system to interpret what the Constitution permits.” [Emphasis added.] In writing the unanimous decision, Chief Justice John Marshal said, “The government of the United States has been emphatically termed a government of laws and not of men…”

Judge Andrew Napolitano made much the same point in this Fox News commentary:

Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul also weighed in on the matter by reminding his readers that not only should the Supreme Court

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Car Dealer Explains Gun Rights to CNN Anchor [VIDEO]

AK47 icon

Whenever the contrast between the media’s vision of the world conflicts with the world as it really is shows up on YouTube, it’s usually delightful to watch. This time, the leftie lady is shredded by the response to her loaded questions about gun rights.

She repeatedly asks: “Isn’t that somehow inappropriate, that you’re giving away vouchers for AK47 rifles to your buyers of new cars and trucks?”

He responds: “Why would that be inappropriate? I’m a businessman. I sell cars and trucks.”

She asks: “Is that just a tad irresponsible?”

He responds: “It might be a little grandstanding…but what about the guy and his wife with twelve children who killed by seven guys coming through the door. I’ll guarantee you he wishes he had an AK47 as those maggots busted through his door and slaughtered him and his wife in front of his twelve children.”

She asks: “But police officers are shot in the line of duty all the time and they carry guns every day so some might not think that’s a great argument.”

He responds: “Well, I personally would like to have a sporting chance instead of just becoming a victim…”

She asks: “Your motto is God, Guns, Guts and American pickup trucks. Why did you come up with that particular motto?”

He responds: “Because we sell cars.”

She asks: “Yes but include God in that. Some might wonder why God would be included in a motto that also includes guns.”

He responds: “You don’t have a problem with God, do you?”

She responds: “No I don’t, but the combination…some people might have a problem with that.”

He responds: “We’re a Christian nation. We’re a Christian people…”

She says: “I just think putting God into a motto that also includes guns might be upsetting to some people.”

See the rest of the interview. It’ll make your day!

Courts and Dept of Justice Agree: Videotaping Police is OK

March 3, 1991: Rodney King being beaten by LAP...

Ken Paulsen, president and CEO of the First Amendment Centerwrote in USA Today that “just as police officers use technology to watch citizens, including patrol car cameras, traffic light cameras and radar to track speeding, the public [also] has a right to monitor the work of officers on the public payroll.”

Perhaps the most memorable and life-altering event in the history of citizens recording police behavior was that moment on the evening of March 3, 1991, when George Halliday, using his Sony video recorder, taped the beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles. By the time the dust had settled, two of the four officers charged in the beating were found guilty, 53 people were dead, 2,383 people were injured, more than 7,000 fires had been set, 3,100 business establishments had been damaged or destroyed, $1 billion in losses had been sustained, and police behavior was permanently altered.

As Joel Rubin noted in his article commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Rodney King incident in the Los Angeles Times

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SOPA, PIPA Blackouts Are Working!

Wikipedia Goes Dark

After months of discussion between and among 1,800 contributors to Wikipedia, the online information source, it decided to “go black” on Wednesday to protest the dangers in two bills that threaten the freedom of the Internet. Many other websites are also participating in today’s protest.

The bills are the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA).

According to Wikipedia, the proposed legislation would put “the burden on website owners to police user-contributed material and call for the unnecessary blocking of entire sites. Small sites won’t have sufficient resources to defend themselves. Big media companies may seek to cut off funding sources for their foreign competitors even if copyright isn’t being infringed. Foreign sites will be blacklisted which means they won’t show up in major search engines. And SOPA and PIPA build a framework for future restrictions and suppression.”

Ostensibly to reduce piracy, the bills overreach greatly. A single perceived violation, for instance, could get an entire website shut down or starved to death through forced cessation of payment processing or delivery of advertising to the website. How this might work if the bills become law is expalained by

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Osama bin Laden: A Critical Look at the AP’s Top Story of 2012

English: Osama bin Laden interviewed for Daily...

The killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in May is the top story of the year according to the Associated Press’s annual poll of U.S. editors and news directors, ABC News announced on Saturday. That story received 128 first-place votes out of 247 ballots cast for the top ten stories. The Japanese earthquake and tsunami was second while the Arab Spring uprisings were third and the financial turmoil in Europe was fourth.

In fifth place was the US economy, the Penn State sex abuse scandal was seventh, Moammar Gadhafi’s death was number seven, the fiscal showdowns in the US congress was number eight, while the Occupy Wall Street protests and the attack on Gabrielle Giffords rounded out the top ten.

The death of Osama bin Laden has generated much controversy as a result of the lack of forthrightness of the Obama administration in answering a number of questions from the very beginning. But the announcement by the AP made no note of such controversy:

He’d been the world’s most-wanted terrorist for nearly a decade, ever since a team of his al-Qaida followers carried out the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. In May, the long and often-frustrating manhunt ended with a nighttime assault by a helicopter-borne special operations squad on his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Bin Laden was shot dead by one of the raiders, and within hours his body was buried at sea.

Paul Craig Roberts was one of the first creditable commentators to ask the most pertinent questions

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.

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