Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: World Bank

WTO celebrates its first global agreement in 12 years

With tears in his eyes, Director-General of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Roberto Azevêdo announced on Saturday the successful culmination of days of difficult negotiations to arrive at the

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CNBC says Larry Summers to replace Ben Bernanke at the Fed

Citing an unnamed source from “Team Obama”, CNBC announced that Larry Summers will be named head of the Federal Reserve by President Obama to replace outgoing chairman Ben Bernanke whose term expires on December 31st.

Despite much media conversation about other potential candidates for the position, chief among them Fed Vice Chairman Janet Yellen, Summers always had the inside track. Summers served as

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What the US can learn from Latvia. Latvia?

What makes this report from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) so remarkable is its source. According to the IMF’s own website,

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an organization of 188 countries, working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world.

The reality is vastly different. The IMF is the agent, along with the World Bank, that drives impoverishment in those 188 countries. Here’s what Anthony Wile says about this tag-team:

The World Bank and the IMF work hand in hand. The World Bank loans money to corrupt governments that loot or squander the funds and then the IMF comes in and insists on an “austerity program” of higher taxes and lower government spending to ensure the loans are paid back.

When a country like Latvia successfully resists the temptation of easy money offered by the IMF and decides instead to the do right, proper and prudent thing, the IMF would be the last place one would find an article praising such a decision, and the natural flow of prosperity that results. Here’s the opening paragraph from the IMF:

Latvia’s economy continues to recover strongly. Following real GDP growth of 5.5 percent in 2011, growth is expected to exceed 5 percent again this year despite recession in the euro area. Labor market conditions are improving. The unemployment rate fell from 16.3 percent at the beginning of the year to 13.5 percent at the end of the third quarter, despite an increase in participation rates. Real wage growth remains restrained. Consumer price inflation has declined sharply, easing to 1.6 percent at end-October after peaking at 4¾ percent in mid-2011. Robust export growth is expected to keep the current account deficit at about 2 percent despite recovering import demand.

Reading between the lines, the IMF is saying that Latvia would be much worse off if they had followed the IMF’s lead in “solving” their financial problems. This is how Anders Aslund, writing for the Peterson Institute for International Economics, put it:

Remember that in 2008–09, Latvia lost 24 percent of its GDP. It was heading toward a budget deficit of 19 percent of GDP in 2009 without a program of radical austerity. But the Latvian government did undertake austerity, and the last two years’ success shows the merits of that policy…

The going does not get much better than this. Latvia will have the highest growth rate and one of the smallest budget deficits in Europe this year, probably 5.3 percent, along with low inflation and wonderful export expansion. The only shortcoming is the still high unemployment rate, but unemployment is a lagging indicator and it is falling sharply.

Here’s how they did it:

The government told people how bad the situation was, and the various social partners responded by signing up to a truly radical austerity program. One-third of the civil servants were laid off; half the state agencies were closed, which prompted deregulation; the average public wage was cut by 26 percent in one year…

Top officials were hit … with 35 percent in wage cuts … [and] public servants were no longer allowed to sit on state corporate boards and earn more than from their salaries, a malpractice that is still common in many European countries. The government exposed high-level corruption.

Is there a lesson here for us?

The Trouble with Outright Monetary Transactions

Mario Draghi presents his credentials as candi...

Mario Draghi presents his credentials as candidate ECB president (Photo credit: European Parliament)

Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank (ECB), spoke before Germany’s Parliament on Wednesday, defending his decision to purchase government bonds from member states needing financial assistance but without unleashing inflation. Similar to the Federal Reserve’s continuing attempts to stimulate the economy through the purchase of government securities, called Quantitative Easing, or QE, Draghi’s Outright Monetary Transactions, or OMT, “will not lead to inflation,” he claimed in the closed-door session. He said:

In our assessment, the greater risk to price stability is currently falling prices in some euro-area countries. In this sense, OMTs are not in contradiction to our mandate; in fact, they are essential for ensuring we can continue to achieve it.

This is utter nonsense, wrote Mish Shedlock, in his blog Global Economic Analysis. Since Draghi’s “mandate” is similar to that of the Federal Reserve — that is, to maintain price stability along with low unemployment — it’s impossible to increase the supply of money by buying government bonds with credits created out of thin air without eventually unleashing price inflation at the consumer level in the economy. Shedlock wrote:

The problem with such nonsense is you cannot break the law while screaming you are upholding it. Draghi now sounds and acts like hypocr[itical] US presidents of both political parties.

Both President Bush and President Obama (as well as the treasury departments under each administration) have shown little concern for the law. Increasingly presidents are of the mind [that] “we have to destroy capitalism [in order] to save it” or as President Bush stated and Obama practices: “ I’ve abandoned free-market principles to save the free-market system.”

What the members of the German Parliament wanted to hear was that Draghi would not be

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Jim Yong Kim: Obama’s Surprise Nominee to World Bank

a photo of Dr. Jim Yong Kim

Friday’s announcement by President Obama that his nominee for president of the World Bank would be Dartmouth College’s President Jim Yong Kim was a surprise, for a number of reasons.

First, Kim has little experience in or obvious connections with the usual coterie of bankers, insiders and political cronies that have served at the World Bank in the past. His expertise instead is in running Partners In Health (PIH), a highly regarded and effective enterprise in providing medical care to the poor around the world, including treatment for AIDS and tuberculosis.

Second, he has a successful track record in fundraising for PIH and for Dartmouth. Third, he is bright, unassuming and winsome. Finally, he solves a number of problems faced by the president in making his selection.

Kim was one of 12 names offered to the President including his Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who expressed her interest in the position immediately after Robert Zoellick announced he would retire from the position in June. Also on the list were well-known politicos with lots of baggage, including Senator John Kerry, current UN ambassador Susan Rice, and Lawrence Summers, former head of the President’s National Economic Council. And Jeffrey Sachs, director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute, was also lobbying for the position.

The President also faced growing resistance from other World Bank members over the rule that only an American could head up the bank, established in 1944 at Bretton Woods.

And so Kim appeared to be clean and pure. The reality is different. Born in South Korea, he moved with his family to Iowa when he was five and rapidly began impressing with his intelligence and energy. Kim served as director of the UN’s World Health Organization, dedicating himself, according to his bio, “to

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New York Times Distracts from the Real European Story

German Logo of the ECB.

Thursday’s article in The New York Times by writers Jack Ewing and Nicholas Kulish about the “rift” between factions over the role of the European Central Bank (ECB) was a distraction and misdirected attention from what is really happening there. The piece makes it sound as though the ECB is standing firm against pressures to have it buy up the debt from Greece and Italy in order to keep the debt “contagion” from spreading elsewhere.

For instance, the article quotes Spain’s Prime Minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, as saying that he expected the ECB to do whatever was necessary, for “this is what we transferred power for…[to] defend the common policy and its countries.” Of course Zapatero would have to say that or he would be gone, just as unelected bankers replaced elected leaders in Greece and Italy. Just a reminder as to who is in charge was reflected by the recent rise in Spain’s borrowing costs, the highest since 1997, and exceeding the “default” level of 7 percent on its 10-year bond. But nothing was said in the article that Zapatero’s comments reflected a desire to save his skin.

In fact the ECB has been taking an active role economically and politically by buying up the debt of those countries in massive amounts, already in excess of $250 billion, and manipulating interest rates to favor the newly installed rulers Mario Monti in Italy and Lucas Papademos in Greece. But authors Ewing and Kulish prefer to present the ECB as being run by “fiercely conservative stewards” who have “steadfastly resisted letting it take up the mantle of lender of last resort.” And to support that falsehood the authors enlisted the help of

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Brazil’s Economy Growing Like a Weed, Government Growing Even Faster

Almir Barbassa of Petrobas at Brazil Energy Co...

With the discovery of huge oil fields off the coast of Brazil in the fall of 2007 came estimates of just what impact they would have on Brazil’s already booming economy. Prior to the discovery of “pre-salt” reserves estimated to be the size of Florida and in excess of 120 billion barrels, Brazil’s economy was already considered to be the 7th largest in the world, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the CIA.

But as the resources are developed, to many observers Brazil is a cinch to take over 6th place by replacing Great Britain in the size of its economy. It’s economy in 2004 was one-third that of Great Britain’s but by 2007 it had grown to half. With the great recession costing the United Kingdom 20 percent of its GDP between 2007 and 2010, and Brazil’s continuing to grow apace by nearly 52 percent, the IMF now estimates that Brazil will take over 6th place by

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Food Crisis Used to Push Global Governance

The original advisory opinion was requested by...

Image via Wikipedia

According to internationally acclaimed author and highly regarded expert Lester Brown, writing in the January 10 issue of Foreign Policy magazine:

Tonight there will be 219,000 additional mouths to feed at the dinner table, and many of them will be greeted with empty plates.

Another 219,000 will join us tomorrow night.

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IMF Wants US Debt Ceiling Raised Immediately

2011MDPresser_Lipsky

Image by International Monetary Fund via Flickr

The June 20th report of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to the United States strongly recommended that the debt ceiling be raised because “if the debt ceiling is not raised soon…[it] would have significant global repercussions, given the central role of U. S. Treasury bonds in world markets. ” In announcing the report, John Lipsky (picture, right), acting managing director for the IMF, said:

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Beginning of the End for Ethanol Subsidies

Ethanol

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On Thursday the United States Senate voted to end the 45 cents-per-gallon subsidy currently supporting the ethanol industry. The bill, offered by liberal Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and conservative Senator Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), was passed overwhelmingly, 73-27. Said Feinstein, “We’ve got to change the way we carry out business. This is going to be the first of many coming down the line. We might as well get used to it now.”

Opposition to ethanol subsidies has been building for years, but the green lobby has successfully overcome all attempts to repeal them, until now. Starting out as a

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The Food Crisis Explained (Away)

Logo of the Food and Agriculture Organization

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Hysterics and Manipulation

When the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) announced its latest round of increases in the cost of food, analysts were nearly breathless in their recommendations for solutions that involved—what else?—more international “cooperation,” under the tender ministrations and control of the UN.

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Funding of Bretton Woods II by George Soros Exposed

DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 27JAN10 - George Soros, Cha...

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When billionaire George Soros wrote two years ago that what the world needed now was “a new world architecture,” he was already laying plans for Bretton Woods II, April 8-11, 2011, to be held at the Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire.

Soros wrote:

While international cooperation on regulatory reform is difficult to achieve on a piecemeal basis, it may be attainable in a grand bargain that rearranges the entire financial order.

A new Bretton Woods conference, like the one that established the international financial architecture after World War II, is needed to establish new international rules…reconstitute the International Monetary Fund (IMF)…[and] to reform the currency system…

Claiming that the international monetary system “cannot survive in its present form,” Soros argues that it could and should be revamped so that American leadership would be “re-established…in a more acceptable form.”

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Egypt: Did Anything Important Happen?

President George W. Bush and Egyptian Presiden...

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When the Los Angeles Times confirmed that protests that started in January in Tunisia and then moved to Egypt were spreading to Algeria, Bahrain, Libya, Morocco, Cameroon, and Kuwait, many concluded that they were being driven by unhappy citizens connected via the internet. On Twitter, for example, protests set for Monday, February 14th, in Bahrain, can be found at #feb14, and #bahman for Libya. Algerian protest details can be found on #feb19, protests in Morocco at #feb20, Cameroon at #feb23, and Kuwait at #mar8.

Some commentators have concluded that there was no one single cause of the Egyptian protests, suggesting that modest exposures of indiscretion by various leaders through Wikileaks had driven disgust into outrage. Some respected writers offered proof that

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Roubini v. Rockwell on the Gold Standard

Nouriel Roubini, Turkish economist, professor ...

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New York University economics professor Nouriel Roubini made a name for himself back in 2005 by predicting the Great Recession long before others did. Fortune magazine wrote “In 2005 Roubini said home prices were riding a speculative wave that would soon sink the economy.” The New York Times said he predicted “homeowners defaulting on mortgages, trillions of dollars of mortgage-backed securities unraveling worldwide and the global financial system shuddering to a halt.” In September, 2006 Roubini warned that “the United States was likely to face a once-in-a-lifetime housing bust, an oil shock, sharply declining consumer confidence, and, ultimately, a deep recession.”

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World Bank’s Trial Balloon Pops

Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick

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Before the Internet, Robert Zoellick’s brief outline of suggested topics for the G20 meeting this week in Seoul, Korea, might have been considered just an interoffice memo. It appeared in London’s Financial Times, contained obscure references to arcane subjects that would be of interest only to international bankers determined to push their agenda for a world currency, and was written by a certified member of the internationalist “insider” cabal. But when Zoellick wrote that the “cooperative monetary system…should also consider employing gold as an international reference point…,” Internet bloggers picked up on it immediately, and the cover was blown.

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Captains of the Economy: The ‘Good Ol’ Boy’ Network is Alive and Well

ABC News Now

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In its attempt to glorify “the 10 who shaped the U.S. economy the most since 2000,” ABC News did a great favor for those interested in the interconnections among the “elite” who are impacting the current world economic and political scene.

Naturally, much was left unsaid about these “captains,” especially regarding their connections to the elite currently in charge. In order, then, here is a brief look at each of these “10 who shaped the U. S. economy”:

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.

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