Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: power

Obama the green dictator

My good friend Bill Jasper at The New American has just written about the Economist‘s about-face on climate change. This change in attitude, as the Economist itself notes, is “a very big deal.”

But good friend Bill fails (I hesitate even to suggest a criticism of his position) to note that

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2nd Generation Quantum Computer System to “Improve” Machine Learning

Two unheralded announcements in May about the collaboration of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Google, and a private, non-profit group, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) marked an impressive, and potentially threatening, milestone in “machine learning” – teaching computers how to

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Michael Hastings, author of The Runaway General that ended McChrystal’s career, dead at 33

Most obituaries about Hasting’s untimely death in a high-speed fiery single-car crash at 4:30AM on Tuesday morning in Los Angeles dwelled on his primary and most visible contribution to investigative journalism, his authorship of The Runaway General in Rolling Stone magazine which led almost immediately to the

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Some Are Raising Questions about Edward Snowden’s Motivations

This article first appeared at the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor:

 

Edward Snowden’s revelations are explosive and continuing, with nearly every major news outlet putting them above the fold ever since the Telegraph published them on June 6th. The secret data-hoovering program called PRISM is now common knowledge and has become part of the lexicon. Bluffdale, Utah, is now essentially a

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Privacy and the changing perception of government

This article in the Washington Post perfectly misses, perhaps deliberately, the key issue concerning privacy and the role of government. See if you can pick up on it.

Daniel Solove is the author, and has all the liberal credentials to promote the establishment line: JD from Yale Law School, is an “expert” on privacy with many books on the matter (some of them best sellers), and has been quoted in such mouthpieces as the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN and NPR. Not a single citation for anything remotely right of center: Washington Times, National Review, American Spectator, etc. So we now where he is coming from.

His thesis: intrusion into our private affairs is concerning, but not too much. He frames his conversation around “myth-busting”, which is a

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Unanimous Supreme Court Ruling on Human Genes is a Split Decision

On Thursday the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that patents on human genes are now void, while the successful creation of synthetic genes may continue to be patented. Both sides of the lawsuit celebrated victory. Mike Adams of Natural News exclaimed: “Sanity prevails: human genes are not eligible for patent protection!” while the ACLU declared: “Victory! Supreme Court Decides Our Genes Belong to Us!”

On the other hand, Myriad Genetics, Inc., the biotechnology company that holds dozens of patents on human genes, wrote:

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The Establishment’s Response to Edward Snowden’s Disclosure of PRISM is Predictable

Now that the source of the leak published last week in the Washington Post has identified himself, the response from defenders of the surveillance state was immediate and predictable. Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old employee of a National Security Agency (NSA) contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, hoped that with the election of President Obama in 2008 the erection of the surveillance state in American would at least be partially dismantled. When it was clear that the infrastructure of that vast intelligence community and its increasingly threatening capabilities was

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Fox News president’s email to his people about the James Rosen affair

Here is Roger Ailes’ email, if you care to look. He says some nice things that I’m certain were reassuring to his employees who are probably asking themselves whenever they send an email or make a phone call, “am I being watched?”

Let’s remember who Roger Ailes is. He is

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Cost Estimate of Government Regulations Doesn’t Measure the Real Cost

This article initially appeared at The New American on May 21st, 2013:

 

The federal government’s cost is measured not only in taxes paid by citizens, or in borrowing when tax revenues aren’t sufficient, but also must be measured in terms of regulations imposed by government agencies to accomplish what congress can’t or won’t. That’s the core of the argument presented by Clyde Wayne Crews of the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) in his introduction of this year’s “Ten Thousand Commandments 2013.”

For the first time in the 20 years that the institute has been attempting to measure the cost of government agencies’ regulations that cost now exceeds

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Exposure of IRS Malfeasances Continue to Erode American’s Confidence in Big Government

After accepting the resignation of the acting commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, Steven Miller (who was going to leave the agency in June anyway), and then reviewing the Treasury’s report on IRS malfeasance in the “conservative charity targeting” scandal, President Obama expressed the sentiments of many on Wednesday:

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Is there more to Google-Berg than Alex Jones is telling us?

Alex Jones, author of Infowars.com and a self-admitted conspiratorialist, has offered his take on the two back-to-back summits taking place the second week of June in Watford, UK. The first is known colloquially as

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IRS Investigations Used in the Past to Intimidate and Punish White House Enemies

The recent admissions of guilt by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that it deliberately targeted conservative non-profits for intimidation have forced to the surface a long list of other IRS abuses that have faded from public memory with the passage of time.

The IRS has been a tool of intimidation and neutralization for decades under administrations as far back as

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Feds Demand Wiki-Weapon Maker Pull Its 3D Gun Blueprints

When Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, received a letter from the U.S. Department of State on Wednesday demanding that he shut down his website that provided free blueprints to build a gun using 3D printing technology, he

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3D Printing: the mass production of custom-designed products

Harry Wallop asks a question, the answer to which is going to change our lives. Here’s the question:

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Boston Bombing Investigation Reveals Government Surveillance of Phone Calls

Sari Horwitz, a writer from the Washington Post reporting on the investigation of Katherine Russell, the wife of the deceased Boston bomber, inadvertently wrote that federal officials had access to the content of phone calls she tried to make to her husband when she learned of his involvement in the incident. Buried inside the fifth paragraph of her report was this:

Officials said that Russell called her husband when she saw his photograph on television – following the FBI’s release of the pictures of the suspects…

Almost immediately Erin Burnett, the host of CNN’s Outfront, wanted to know how the government knew. Aren’t phone calls supposed to be private? She interviewed Tim Clemente, a former FBI counterterrorism agent on May 1st, asking:

Is there any way … they [the federal investigators] can try to get the phone companies to give that up … It’s not a voice mail. It’s just a conversation. There’s no way they can actually find out what [was said on the call], right, unless she tells them?

Clemente:  There is a way. We certainly have ways in national security investigations to find out exactly what was said in that conversation. It’s not necessarily something that the FBI is going to want to present in court, but it may help lead the investigation … we certainly can find that out.

Burnett: So they can actually get that? … that is incredible.

Clemente: Welcome to America. All of that stuff is being captured as we speak, whether we know it or like it, or not.

Glenn Greenwald, writing in The Guardian, explained just what kind of “stuff” the FBI is able to track: “all digital communications – meaning phone calls, emails, online chats and the like – are automatically recorded and stored and [are] accessible to the government after the fact. To describe that is to define what a ubiquitous, limitless Surveillance State is.”

Greenwald pointed to the experience of Mark Klein, covered by The Washington Post back in 2007, when he was working as an AT&T technician in San Francisco in 2002. He was interrupted by an agent from the National Security Agency (NSA) who then introduced Klein to the system the NSA was setting up to “vacuum up internet and phone call data from ordinary Americans” with the help of AT&T. The article explained:

 [Klein] said the NSA built a special room to receive data streamed through an AT&T Internet room containing “peering links,” or major connections to other telecom providers. The largest of the links delivered 2.5 gigabits of data — the equivalent of one-quarter of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s text — per second…

When Klein saw what was happening, it was his “aha moment. They’re sending the entire Internet to the secret room!” Using a glass prism that divided the information into two pieces, the NSA could monitor every bit of data going across the internet without impeding its flow:

This splitter was sweeping up everything, vacuum-cleaner style. The NSA is getting everything. These are major pipes that carry not just AT&T’s customers but everybody’s.

I flipped out. They’re copying the whole Internet! There’s no selection going on here. Maybe they select out later, but at the point of handoff to the government, they get everything.

In April of last year, an NSA whistleblower, William Binney, was interviewed by Juan Gonzalez and Amy Goodman at Democracy Now, and revealed just how extensive the data collection is and how it is justified. Binney said that Section 215 of the Patriot Act

 gives them license to take all commercially held data about us…

 [This] is extremely dangerous because if you take that and put it into forms of graphing … and then watch it over time, you can build up knowledge about everyone in the country.

And having that knowledge then allows them ability to concoct all kinds of charges, if they want to target you.

When asked about how much information is already stored, Binney responded: “I would suggest that they’ve assembled on the order of 20 trillion transactions about U.S. citizens.”

And where is that information being stored? Bluffdale, Utah. Said Binney: “[The Utah Data Center located at Bluffdale, Utah] is a very large storage device, actually, for remote interrogation and remote processing. That’s the way I view that. Because there’s not enough people there to actually work the data there, so it’s being worked somewhere else.”

The facility in Utah will exceed 1 million square feet, nearly six times the size of a Walmart Supercenter, and will be able, when it is completed in September, to capture “all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails: parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter,’” according to James Bamford, author of The Shadow Factory.

An associate of Bamford’s, Jeff Wright, author of The Citizen’s Last Stand, noted in his book:

James Bamford, a New York Times bestselling author, has detailed some of the NSA’s … capabilities…

Bamford actually began his career during the Viet Nam War as an administrative tech in the same place I did, the Naval Security Group. His first book [The Puzzle Palace] freaked-out the core leadership at the Agency. In actuality, it barely scratched the surface.

In an interview with The New American, Wright added:

This capability [to capture all digital information on Americans] has existed for quite some time…

I have seen the access points at several major carrier facilities…

It started during the Cold War as a program named “HYDRA.” It has morphed … since then. The facilities, such as at Bluffdale, Utah, will allow real-time analysis.

Naturally, the NSA denies all of this. On April 15th, the agency issued a statement denying that it will eavesdrop on innocent citizens:

Many unfounded allegations have been made about the planned activities of the Utah Data Center…one of the biggest misconceptions about NSA is that we are unlawfully listening in on, or reading emails of, U.S. citizens. This is simply not the case.

There’s a rule about power and restraint of that power: “If they can, they will.” Since they can, they are. Now there’s a new rule: “Watch what you say. Somewhere, someone out there is listening.” Just ask Katherine Russell.

 

 

 

 

Gun Confiscation via the Therapeutic State Moves Ahead in California

California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law on Wednesday legislation that provides $24 million in funding to hire another 36 “special agents” to scour neighborhoods starting in July to confiscate an estimated 40,000 firearms owned by citizens deemed to own them illegally due to reasons which include a diagnosis of mental illness.

Those approximately 20,000 citizens likely purchased them legally but

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.