Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: lawsuit

Chicago Immigration Lawsuit Fraught With Errors, Inconsistencies, Illogic

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, August 16, 2017: 

, former White House Chief of Staff

A closer look at the lawsuit that Chicago filed against Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week over his threat to withhold grant money reveals enough errors, inconsistencies, and just plain poor logic that might be enough for the judge to toss it, with prejudice.

The lawsuit that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel had threatened over Session’s imposition of new conditions for receiving Bryne Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) funds — including alerting the federal government when an illegal alien has been arrested and is about to be released — claimed that the threat of lost funding was unconstitutional, violated states’ rights, and threatened the city’s long-standing Welcoming City ordinance. The Welcoming City ordinance includes language that

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Brady Campaign Hangs Anti-gun Couple Out to Dry When They Lose Lawsuit

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, August 9, 2017:

Brady Campaign

Three years after Jessica Ghawi was gunned down by mental case James Holmes in an Aurora, Colorado, theater, her parents, at the urging of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence (aka the Brady Center), filed suit against the dealer, Lucky Gunner, who sold Holmes his ammunition. In August 2015, the judge threw out their case and required them to pay the gun dealer’s legal fees:

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Chicago Mayor Emanuel Files Suit to Block Federal Withholding of Grant Funds

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, August 7, 2017:

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel (shown) announced over the weekend that he would be filing a motion to stop the federal government from withholding grant funds under the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program. Municipalities such as Chicago receive this funding to help them fight crime. Lord knows, crime is rampant in Chicago. But federal funding, which Chicago has been receiving all along, does not necessarily mean less crime. It does mean, however, that the federal government, as the provider of the funding, may use the funding as leverage to get the recipients to do what the feds want them to do — in this case, upholding federal immigration laws.

After all, isn’t this simply a case of (to quote an old adage):

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Trump, Sessions Increase Pressure on Sanctuary Cities

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, July 26, 2017:

English: U.S. Sanctuary Cities Map: cities tha...

U.S. Sanctuary Cities Map: cities that have adopted “sanctuary” ordinances

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions upped the ante on sanctuary cities on Tuesday by declaring that any state not complying with requests concerning illegal immigrants held in local jails will lose federal grant money. He stated:

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Liberal Professor to Sue Evergreen for $3.8 Million Over “Racially Hostile” Campus Environment

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, July 26, 2017:

Bret Weinstein, the liberal college professor who refused to go along with radical student demands at Evergreen State College for a “Day of Absence” — a day without white people on campus — has filed his intention to sue the college. The amount demanded, $3.85 million, is for damages he suffered, and continues to suffer, as explained by Weinstein’s attorney:

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Democrats Used Discredited Dossier Against Trump

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, July 14, 2017: 

The ripple effect from the publishing in January by far-left BuzzFeed of the phony, discredited “Trump Dossier” written by anti-Trump British MI6 agent Christopher Steele is still being felt. As a result of a London lawsuit against Steele, the former British spy was forced to admit that his information, which was obtained from various unnamed Kremlin sources, was never verified as accurate. But that hasn’t deterred Democrats determined to harm or destroy the Trump presidency from using it as fodder for their attacks.

Steele, a confirmed socialist, wrote a series of memos about information he said he had gleaned from various “Kremlin insiders,” a “trusted compatriot,” “former top level Russian intelligence officers still active inside the Kremlin,” and two other unnamed sources he referred to as “sources A and B.” But Steele stumbled when, in memo #16, he claimed that members of the Russian spy service FSB were to meet with one of Trump’s people in a conspiracy to defame Hillary Clinton. Wrote Steele:

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College Professors Have Their Incoherent and Illogical Lawsuit Tossed

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, July 12, 2017:

Littlefield Fountain and Main Building of The ...

Littlefield Fountain and Main Building of The University of Texas at Austin.

Three members of the 16,500 faculty of the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) became so incensed over the passage of Texas’ concealed carry on campus law that they decided, along with the assistance of a local Austin attorney, to file suit against everyone in sight to block its implementation scheduled for August 1. The district judge tossed it last week for lack of standing.

The lawsuit exposed not only the lack of standing, but the lack of understanding by the trio and their attorney, not only of the law, but the complete waste of time and Austin taxpayer money required for this frivolous complaint that resulted in nothing but bad publicity for the attorney and exposure of the silliness of professors with nothing better to do.

Hicks is a sole practitioner in Austin, while the three complainants were predictable liberals teaching at UTA:

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Texas Professors’ Frivolous Concealed-carry Lawsuit Tossed Due to Lack of Standing

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, July 11, 2017:  

When District Court Judge Lee Yeakel dismissed the frivolous lawsuit last week brought by three University of Texas professors against the state’s attorney general and numerous others, he claimed the trio had no standing. It’s also clear from the details that the professors also had no understanding of the issues involved. Instead they invoked conjecture over cogency, and the judge rightfully threw out the suit.

The three female professors — Jennifer Lynn Glass, Lisa Moore, and Mia Carter — with the help of a local attorney, made up their case against the law that allows concealed carry on the public campuses of Texas effective August 1. They feared that, somehow, armed students in their classrooms would

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Ruling for Big Taxi in Europe Could Spell End for Uber, Lyft, Airbnb

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, May 12, 2017:

In what could spell the end of Uber (and by inference other digital information providers such as Lyft and Airbnb) in Europe, an advisor to the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has recommended that the court treat Uber as a “transportation service” and not a digital information service.

Advocate General Maciej Szpunar, a Polish lawyer, whose opinion carries such great weight among the 15 judges making up the ECJ that they usually follow it, said on Thursday: “The Uber electronic platform, whilst innovative, falls within the field of transport. Uber can thus be required to obtain the necessary licenses and authorizations under national law.”

Translation: Uber must now look and act like Big Taxi. Drivers cannot be “amateurs” but

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Supreme Court’s Non-decision Expands Passenger Ridesharing Freedom

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, April 27, 2017: 

By declining to hear an appeal, the Supreme Court on Monday essentially declared that rules protecting the taxi cartel in Chicago were null and void, thus expanding passenger freedom. As an attorney with the Institute for Justice (IJ), which represented Chicago Uber driver Dan Burgess, explained: “Today’s decision makes clear what [IJ] has said for years. The Constitution does not require [city] governments to stick with outdated protectionist regulations in the face of technological innovation.”

When Uber and other ride-sharing companies entered the Chicago market several years ago, they soon became a thorn in the side of the taxi cartel that had operated under protectionist rules dating back to 1937. Those rules

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Bill O’Reilly to Leave Fox News

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, April 19, 2017: 

It’s Bill O’Reilly’s history of sexual harassment, and not his false conservativism, that will end his career as host of his The O’Reilly Factor, according to two stories in the Wall Street Journal. Joe Flint, writing for the Journal, said the “final resolution on the fate of Mr. O’Reilly … could come as early as the next several days.”

That resolution could come even sooner

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Bank of America Fined Again; Board Likely to Laugh It Off

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, March 29, 2017:

Photo of Bank of America ATM Machine by Brian ...

Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein fined Bank of America $45 million on Thursday for deliberately and intentionally harming a young couple who got caught up the real estate collapse and had to downsize. Erik and Renee Sundquist made a down payment on a smaller home and borrowed the balance from Countrywide Home Loans. When they couldn’t make the payments on that loan, the couple was advised by Bank of America, which owned Countrywide, to default as a precondition for a loan modification in order to lower their payments.

Klein described what happened next in his ruling in Sundquist v. Bank of America as a series of events so fantastic and bizarre as to be nearly incomprehensible:

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Keystone XL Pipeline Granted Approval by State Department

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, March 24, 2017: 

Keystone XL demonstration, White House,8-23-20...

With the signing of the cross-border permit by the State Department on Friday, the real work on completing Phase IV of the Keystone Pipeline from Canada to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast begins. TransCanada, the owner and operator of the pipeline, still thinks the project is viable economically even though it has been stalled for 16 months by the previous administration. In a press release, TransCanada’s CEO Russ Girling said:

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AG Sessions’ Strong Support of Local Police Misses Key Point

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, March 17, 2017:

Anti-ACLU-2

Attorney General Jeff Sessions addressed a gathering of federal, state, and local law-enforcement officials in Richmond, Virginia, on Wednesday morning, announcing a new direction in law enforcement under the Trump administration. He stated: “[President] Trump issued a policy to [his] administration to reduce crime, and that’s what I take as my marching order.”

He decried the jump in violent crime and murders in major cities over the last two years, ending the long steady decline in those numbers nationally over the past several decades:

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Baltimore’s State Attorney Marilyn Mosby About to Face Her Moment of Truth

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, January 13, 2017:

A federal judge just allowed a lawsuit brought against Baltimore’s state attorney Marilyn Mosby to proceed. The lawsuit, filed by five of the six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray (in mural, center) in 2015, will move to “discovery” – the phase where, under oath, Mosby and her enablers, including deputy Sheriff Samuel Cogen, must answer questions about those charges.

To review: Freddie Gray, a young black punk with a rap sheet containing 20 charges, mostly drug-related, ran from

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Officers’ Lawsuit Against Marilyn Mosby in Freddie Gray Case Allowed to Proceed

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, January 12, 2017:

Five of the six officers charged as accessories in the death of Freddie Gray in April 2015 filed suit against Baltimore’s state attorney Marilyn Mosby (shown) for malicious prosecution, defamation of character, and invasion of privacy, among other claims. Last Friday U.S. District Court Judge Marvin Garbis, in a 65-page ruling, ruled that their lawsuit against Mosby may move forward.

The next step is discovery during which Mosby and others in her department, as well as the Sheriff’s department, will be required, under oath, to explain

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Massachusetts AG Busy Defending Her Unconstitutional “Enforcement Notice” on “Copycat” Assault Weapons

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, January 5, 2017:  

English: A M4A1 with SOPMOD package, including...

A M4A1 with SOPMOD package, including Rail Interface System and Trijicon 4x ACOG.

Even though Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey knew that her unilateral expansion of an 18-year-old law to ban anything that looked like an “assault weapon” was likely to be challenged, she went ahead with it anyway. On July 20 of last year, she imperiously announced her “enforcement notice” to every gun maker and dealer in the state:

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Reversal Sought in Dismissal of Lawsuit Against Remington in Connecticut

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 16, 2016:  

Remington Arms

The long war against guns continues. When District Superior Court Judge Barbara Bellis dismissed the lawsuit last month brought against Remington Arms by families of victims following the massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, the plaintiffs’ attorney said they planned to appeal. That appeal was filed on Tuesday with the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Bellis had dismissed the original suit in light of the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA) passed by Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2005. In her opinion she wrote:

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City Council Votes to Put “In God We Trust” Plaque in City Hall

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, November 1, 2016:  

Dwight D. Eisenhower, official portrait as Pre...

Dwight D. Eisenhower

When then-President Dwight Eisenhower signed into law the country’s motto “In God We Trust” on July 30, 1956, he stated, “In this way we are reaffirming the transcendence of religious faith in America’s heritage and future; in this way we shall constantly strengthen those spiritual weapons which forever will be our country’s most powerful resource in peace and war.”

Last week, the City Council of Chesapeake, Virginia, agreed with Eisenhower, unanimously voting to

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Claim of “Negligent Entrustment” Fails in Lawsuit Against Remington Arms

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, October 17, 2016:  

Remington Arms

Lawyers decided to attempt to nullify a law passed by Congress a decade ago protecting the gun industry from frivolous (and costly) lawsuits. The law, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA), signed into law by President George Bush in 2005, specifically and deliberately prohibits civil liability actions against any part of America’s gun industry for damages or injunctive or other relief resulting from the misuse – criminal or otherwise – of their products.

There’s an exception built into the law called “negligent entrustment” which

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.