Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: impact

Ethanol Mandates Mean Big Profits for Big Oil

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, October 28, 2016:  

When the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was signed into law by then-President George W. Bush, it was well-intended: It would increase America’s oil independence and reduce dependence on foreign oil, it would produce cleaner air, and it would help farmers.

The Act required refiners to add ethanol to every gallon of gasoline they produced. If a refiner decided it couldn’t (too costly) or wouldn’t (internal decision) do so, it would be required to

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Candidates Silent as Government Spending Jumps, Deficit Increases

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, October 17, 2016:  

On Friday, the Treasury Department published the final revenue and spending numbers for the federal government for Fiscal Year 2016, which ended on September 30. According to Treasury’s report, spending increased significantly (by nearly five percent) over the previous year, to more than $3.8 trillion, while revenues remained essentially flat from the year before, at $3.25 trillion. That left a shortfall of approximately $600 billion, forcing the government to borrow 15 cents of every dollar it spent last year. And the two presidential candidates have remained disturbingly silent about the issue.

Said Robert Bixby, the executive director of the Concord Coalition, a non-partisan group that favors reducing the deficit,

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Override of Obama Veto Could Be Costly

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, September 29, 2016:

September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City: V...

The joy of the first override of one of President Barack Obama’s vetoes is likely to fade as its future negative impact on U.S. security and intelligence services is revealed. Conservative constitutional scholar Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) said nothing about this in his commendation of the Senate’s vote on Wednesday to override President Obama’s veto of JASTA — the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act:

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Would Trump’s Corporate Tax Cut Help the Economy?

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, September 28, 2016:  

 Removing the noise and the histrionics from Monday night’s presidential debate, there is a clear division between the two major-party candidates on the state of the economy and what to do about it.

The Democrat candidate said that the economy is on the mend, that jobs are being created, that real incomes have just recently increased, and that the outlook for the economy is sanguine.

The Republican candidate held the opposite view: after seven years the economy is still struggling, the recovery is the weakest in recent memory, and the outlook is bleak.

The Wall Street Journal noted that Trump’s case is the stronger,

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Murders Up Nearly 11% in 2015, Most in 20 Years

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, September 27, 2016:  

Statistics from the FBI’s report Crime in the United States, 2015, released September 25, confirm previous reports that the long decline in violent crime has ended. Murders in the United States in 2015 rose by 10.8 percent over the previous year, dwarfing any increases seen over the last 20 years. And the rise continues into 2016, with reported homicides up another 15 percent through June compared to the same period last year.

In June of 2015, BBC News reported that

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Fully Self-driving Cars by 2021, Says Ford CEO

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, August 18, 2016:  

On Tuesday, during a hectic day of media interviews about the coming revolution being caused by autonomous vehicles (AVs), Ford’s CEO Mark Fields told Wall Street analysts that such vehicles “could have just as significant an impact on society as [Henry] Ford’s moving assembly line did 100 years ago.” He told workers at a Ford plant in Palo Alto, “This is a transformational moment in our industry … it is a transformational moment in our company. We are making people’s lives better by changing the way the world moves.”

He said that his company’s foray begins with e-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft and will expand to the consumer market by 2021 if not sooner.

He’s not alone.

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Robots Are Taking Over Agriculture

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, January 29, 2016:  

The Fourth Industrial Revolution will soon allow a single factory to produce more than 30,000 heads of lettuce every day, using 98 percent less water, 30 percent less energy, and 50 percent fewer humans.

The Japanese grower Spread will open its Vegetable Factory next year using robots instead of humans not only to plant the seeds but

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A Black Swan Event and $4 Oil?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, November 20, 2015:  

Eight years ago Nassim Taleb’s book The Black Swan was named by the Sunday Times as one of the twelve most influential books since World War II. Now serving as Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering, Taleb continues to build on his view that “black swan” events have a greater impact on culture and the economy simply because they are unexpected. As Chris Anderson explains in his review of Taleb’s book:

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Study: Businesses, Taxpayers Fleeing High-tax States

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, September 10, 2015: 

Based on the latest data from the Internal Revenue Service, Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) concluded that, given the opportunity, taxpayers as well as businesses move from high-tax states to lower-tax states. In 2013, more than 200,000 people moved from New York, Illinois, California, Connecticut, and Massachusetts to Texas, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Arizona.

And they took with them more than

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Seattle Progressives Prove Certain Economic Laws Cannot Be Repealed

This article was published at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, August 14, 2015:  

Peter, Paul & Mary

By changing the meaning of the word “flowers” to “businesses,” the lyrics from Peter, Paul & Mary’s anti-war song applies perfectly to the new Seattle under its new minimum wage mandates: Where have all the businesses gone?

Where have all the flowers gone, long time passing?”
Where have all the flowers gone, long time ago?
Where have all the flowers gone?
Young girls have picked them everyone.
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

And when will Mayor Ed Murray and his gaggle of progressives who unanimously passed the anti-business, anti-employment minimum wage law last summer ever learn: you cannot fool Mother Nature, and you cannot repeal economic laws.

In Murray’s case the economic law still to be learned is:

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Seattle’s Minimum-wage Increase Starting to Cost Jobs

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, August 13, 2015:

Jodi Hall, owner of Cupcake Royale, a small th...

Jodi Hall, owner of Cupcake Royale

The Seattle city council mandate that business owners must raise the minimum wage they pay to their workers to $11 an hour (on the way to $15 an hour over the next few years) is already having its predicted effect: In the first six months of this year, 1,300 restaurant workers in the city have lost their jobs, according to the American Enterprise Institute (AEI).

In the single month of May, one month after the $11 mandate kicked in on April 1, 1,000 workers lost their jobs which, according to AEI economist Mark Perry, “was the largest one month job decline since … the [start of] the Great Recession.”

In simple terms, thanks to the progressives running the city council, Seattle restaurant workers are suffering their own recession.

To add salt to the wound, statewide (not including Seattle), restaurant employment has increased by 3.2 percent, adding 2,800 jobs over that same period.

This wasn’t supposed to happen,

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EPA: No “Widespread, Systemic” Fracking Impact on Drinking Water

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, June 5, 2015: 

Following the EPA’s release of the initial draft of its “Hydraulic Fracturing Drinking Water Assessment” on Thursday, expressions of joy exuded from fracking industry officials and pro-fracking politicians while anger erupted from environmentalists.

Responding to pressure from Congress to “study the relationship between hydraulic fracking and drinking water,” the EPA spent years and millions of taxpayer dollars to conclude, tentatively at least, that fracking doesn’t pollute or poison drinking water in areas close to fracking wells.

It was also tasked to uncover any “potential for hydraulic fracturing to change the quality or quantity of drinking water resources … [and to identify] factors affecting the frequency or severity of any potential changes.”

After exploring all possible mechanisms by which fracking might possibly negatively impact local drinking water supplies, the EPA reported:

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Driverless Cars to Disrupt Industry, Benefit Consumers

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, May 21, 2015: 

English: Google driverless car operating on a ...

Google driverless car operating on a testing path

 

Brian Johnson, in his “Disruptive Mobility” report issued by Barclays Bank on Tuesday, sees that a future with driverless cars will mean far fewer cars on the road, a much smaller GM and Ford, and consumer travel costs cut by two-thirds. A generation from now there will be just 100 million cars on American roads (compared to 250 million today), and new car sales will fall below levels touched at the bottom of the Great Recession: less than 10 million a year.

This means that, unless they adapt and adopt new strategies, and perhaps a new business model, General Motors and Ford will likely be vastly smaller enterprises than they are today. He predicts that

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Little Old Lady About to Make History in the Oil Patch

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Thursday, April 2, 2015:

Cover of "Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make ...

Historians like people who make history. People like Rosa Parks (the “first lady of civil rights”), and Suzette Kelo (see Kelo v. City of New London). So much so that Laurel Thatcher Ulrich made herself known by writing “Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History,” in which she said:

Some history-making is intentional; much of it is accidental. People make history when they scale a mountain, ignite a bomb, or refuse to move to the back of the bus.

It may be that historians will someday add Sandra Ladra to that list.

Sandra Ladra was sitting in her recliner in her home in Prague, Oklahoma, on the evening of November 5, 2011, when

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Obamnesty: A Tyrant’s Tool to Transform America

This article was just published in the latest subscribers-only issue of the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor newsletter:

 

This writer has frequently noted the accuracy of John Adams’ summary and dangers of the Founders’ Constitution when he said that it “was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” It was designed, as Thomas Jefferson noted, to keep criminals like Barack Obama from taking control:

 

The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first.

 

During the Constitutional convention there was little debate over the issue of immigration and so those chains were not forged with the result that the states, up until 1808, were to determine their own immigration policies, and afterwards to defer to the national government.

 

Consequently, when Obama asked his henchmen, Jeh Johnson and Eric Holder, to find ways he could implement the DREAM Act without having to wait for Congress to enact it, they succeeded, using the president’s discretion allowed by the Constitution under Article I, Section 4, that “he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed.”

One of the tools of a tyrant is using language to hide his true intents. For years Obama has disclaimed any such powers as he is now exercising. As a candidate back in March, 2008, he said:

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President Unveils Plan to Eviscerate Energy Boom With Methane Mandates

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, January 14 2015:

The EPA was directed to set standards for radi...

On Wednesday, President Obama announced plans to move ahead with mandating methane emission reductions primarily directed at the renaissance in the energy industry.

This unleashes his Environmental Protection Agency to create new rules to limit methane emissions from cows, landfills, coal mines and, most particularly, the oil and gas industry. Unless derailed or challenged successfully by Congress, the new rules would become effective in late 2016.

Dan Utech, special assistant to the president for climate change, promised that the EPA’s new rules, which will be intended to cut methane emissions nearly in half over the next decade, will

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Impacts of Lower Crude Oil Prices Continue to Spread

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, January 13, 2015:

 

After oil forecaster Jeremy Warner got lucky last year when he accurately called the top in oil prices, with a fall to at least $80 a barrel, he doubled down by predicting “that the oil price will remain low for a long time, sinking to perhaps as little as $20 a barrel over the coming year before recovering a little.”

Warner got lucky once again when Goldman Sachs confirmed his prognosis, setting off an eye-popping five percent decline in oil to $45 a barrel which continued into Tuesday. Tuesday’s low was $44.20. As Goldman Sachs noted,

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Oil Patch Activity Is Starting to Slow

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, January 9, 2015:

U.S. Steel

In a letter to his union workers at U.S. Steel’s pipe and tube plant in Lorain, Ohio, Tom McDermott, president of United Steelworkers local 1104, was blunt:

The company has suddenly lost a great deal of business because of the recent downturn in the oil industry. What appeared just a few short weeks ago as being a productive year … has most abruptly turned sour.

So sour that U.S. Steel is idling 614 or its 700 workers in Lorain, along with all 142 of its workers in its Houston, Texas plant.

This is likely to be just the beginning. Even as U.S. Steel poured hundreds of millions into its gamble that producing “oil country tubular goods,” or OCTG, would reverse years of losses, other steel makers have done the same:

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New Jersey Driving Away Businesses

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, January 9, 2015: 

Mercedes-Benz

On Tuesday, when Mercedes-Benz’s North American Chairman Stephen Cannon finally confirmed the rumors swirling around his company’s headquarters in Montvale, New Jersey, that he was going to move it to Atlanta, Georgia, he didn’t tell the whole truth:

New Jersey has been a wonderful home to our U.S. operations for our first 50 years, and still is today. The state has worked tirelessly with us as we evaluated our options.

 

Ultimately, however, it became apparent that to achieve the sustained, profitable growth and efficiencies we require for the decades ahead, our headquarters would have to be located elsewhere.

 

That brought us to Atlanta.

It was the location that sealed the deal, according to Cannon:

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Fracking Mythbusters

This is the second of two articles on fracking that will appear shortly in the print edition of The New American magazine:

Myths become reality only when they are left unchallenged. There are so many myths, half-truths, misstatements, and distortions about the issue of fracking that one scarcely knows where to begin. The most egregious is the falsehood that “you can light your tap water on fire because of fracking.”

This canard first saw the light of day in Gasland, a propaganda piece produced by Josh Fox (pictured below) and funded and supported by various extremist members and groups affiliated with the environmental movement. Early in the film, Fox showed a flaming faucet belonging to Weld County, Colorado, homeowner Mike Markham. In that segment, when a lighted match touched water flowing from his kitchen faucet, it virtually exploded into flame.

Not mentioned in that sequence, however, was that Markham knew about his flaming faucet well before Fox showed up on his doorstep with his cameramen and that he also knew that

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.