Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: impact

Restaurants Add “Labor Surcharge” to Tabs to Cover Minimum-wage Increases

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, March 13, 2017:

English: This is actually Tom's Restaurant, NY...

Instead of increasing their menu prices in response to increased minimum-wage levels, restaurant owners are burying their increased labor costs at the bottom of each tab. The increase, between three and four percent, only comes after the customer has completed his meal. The increase also increases the tip customers leave behind as most customers leave a gratuity based on the check’s total. This is going to raise the average customer’s check, which has already increased by nearly 11 percent since 2012, close to five or six percent.

Some restaurant and fast-food owners aren’t burying the increase but are instead calling attention to it so that customers know that they’re the ones actually bearing the brunt of the forced increase in the minimum wage. Sami Ladeki, the owner of six Sammy’s Woodfired Pizza & Grill restaurants in San Diego and eight others across California, used to call it a “California mandate” but removed it after getting a call from the city attorney. Ladeki, who says he makes a profit of around one percent charging $12 to $14 a pizza, told the Wall Street Journal:

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Study: Savings in Welfare Costs Could Pay for Trump’s Wall

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, February 16, 2017:

On paper, the study entitled “The Cost of a Border Wall vs. the Cost of Illegal Immigration,” published by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), seems to make sense:

If a [southern] border wall stopped a small fraction of the illegal immigrants who are expected to come in the next decade, the fiscal savings from having fewer illegal immigrants in the country would be sufficient to cover the costs of the wall.

There are many assumptions built into Camarota’s analysis, but the big one not mentioned is this:

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Blowing Up the Globalists’ Plans

This article was published by the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, February 13, 2017:

Logo of United Nations Refugee Agency.Version ...

Logo of United Nations Refugee Agency.

The Royal Institute of International Affairs (RIIA) grew out of failure. Known alternatively as Chatham House, it was conceived during the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 (also called the Versailles Peace Conference). It was decided that, once the so-called “peace” terms were put in place to punish Germany and its allies after the War to end all wars, various insiders decided a one-world government was needed to keep such a catastrophe from occurring in the future. It birthed the

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Realtors in Vancouver Moving to Seattle Along with Investors

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, February 10, 2017:  

Vancouver on a rainy day

Vancouver on a rainy day

The collapse of the real estate market in Vancouver, BC, is forcing realtors there to “double-license” in Seattle (where home prices are half what they are in Vancouver) in order to stay in business. Some of them are representing sellers with property in Vancouver who are simultaneously buying in Seattle. The ripple effect in Vancouver is impacting builders and construction workers as well as those in related service industries.

Back in August, the tune was much different: home prices had increased by 50 percent over the previous three years thanks to foreign investors wanting property in Vancouver. “It’s a bubble!” was the cry and so do-gooder politicians in the local government decided to erect a tariff: starting on August 1 the “foreign buyer transfer tax” of 15 percent would be imposed on any foreign buyer of real estate in the city.

Within six weeks the high end of the market was off by 20 percent, and realtors were scrambling, builders were pulling back, and workers were being laid off.

The parallel with Trump’s plans to build a wall along the country’s southern border through tariffs of 35 percent is uncanny, with the results likely to be the same as Vancouver’s. Fred Floss, the chairman of the economics department at SUNY Buffalo State, says that imposing a tariff on Mexico will have a similar slowing effect in the United States. Because the US mainly imports auto parts and small engines from Mexico, “anything that has a small engine in it will start to cost more … the scary thing is that a lot of those motors go into things Americans make. So if all of a sudden it gets to be more expensive to make goods in the United States, then we’re going to start to see layoffs because our goods aren’t going to sell.” He added: “In other words, [Americans are] going to pay the cost of the wall” both directly and indirectly.

The ripple effect in Vancouver is just beginning to be felt as the slowdown starts to impact support jobs related to the real estate industry. Homeowners who have enjoyed seeing their paper profits escalate are now facing the new reality: their homes aren’t worth what they were as recently as last summer, and those who took advantage of low rates either to buy new or obtain a home equity loan are increasingly finding themselves underwater and unable to find a buyer to bail them out.

International trade unhampered by tariffs benefits consumers and sellers alike. Every trade results in each party being better off economically. Competition drives the prices of goods and services down, allowing purchasers to enjoy a higher standard of living. Those profiting from making the products consumers want, whether they be small motors, cell phones or automobiles, will be encouraged to expand their production, hiring new workers who then are able to increase their own purchasing power. Ad infinitim.

Adam Smith was right:

Every individual necessarily labors to render the annual revenue of the society as great as he can….

 

He intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention…. (emphasis added)

 

By pursuing his own interests, he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it.

And then Smith adds his warning for Mr. Trump:

I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good.

Meddling always has its unintended consequences. Is Mr. Trump aware of what’s going on in Vancouver?


Sources:

The Wall Street Journal: For Chinese Home Buyers, Seattle Is the New Vancouver

Seattlepi.com:  Vancouver smacks Chinese with real estate tax, but will they head south?

Background on US tariffs

WGRZ.com: How the Trump Tariff Proposal may Impact your Budget

Investopedia:  The Basics Of Tariffs And Trade Barriers

Adam Smith’s “invisible hand” quote

Pew: BLM Making Cops Reluctant to Enforce the Law

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, January 11, 2017:  

DAVOS/SWITZERLAND, 27JAN10 - George Soros, Cha...

George Soros, the funding source of BLM

A measure of just how effective the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement has become in its virulent anti-police protests was released on Wednesday by Pew Research Center. In its report “Behind the Badge,” reflecting the view of nearly 8,000 active law-enforcement officials, Pew stated: “Recent high-profile fatal encounters between black citizens and police officers have made their jobs riskier, aggravated tensions between police and blacks, and left many officers reluctant to fully carry out some of their duties.”

Specifically those BLM-inspired and George Soros-funded protests have increased tensions between

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Another Setback for Big Taxi: Uber, Lyft OK’d to Serve Atlanta Airport

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, January 2, 2017:  

Following months of negotiations with Uber, Lyft and other ride-sharing (e-hailing) companies, the city of Atlanta, which owns and operates the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (shown), is allowing them to serve passengers effective on Sunday, January 1, 2017.

They have been serving them for months despite restrictions, but those rules were rarely enforced. Now it’s legal.

But not without costs. First,

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LOL Illinois: Corporate Group Works to Keep State From Becoming a Laughingstock

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, December 28, 2016:  

English: 1987 Illinois license plate

The name of the group LOL Illinois can taken two ways: Land of Lincoln, or Laughing Out Loud. As Scott Santi, chairman of Illinois Tool Works, which employs 48,000 workers around the world, noted:

There’s a crisis of confidence in terms of a plan to address some pretty significant structural problems in the state. It’s challenging for Illinois to be competitive given the uncertainty around the fiscal crisis.

“Crisis of confidence”? “Challenging”? “Uncertainty”? Illinois was headed into oblivion until Bruce Rauner, the first Republican governor in 12 years, faced reality.

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McDonald’s Response to $15 Minimum Wage: Automation in Every Store

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 23, 2016: 

English: The mdonalds logo from the late 90s

It’s official: McDonald’s says that every one of its 14,000 stores nationwide will be replacing order takers with automated touch-screen kiosks. They’re starting with stores where minimum-wage laws mandate the highest rates, such as Florida, New York, San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Seattle.

According to CNNMoney:

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OPEC Lives in a Dream World

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, November 18, 2016:  

There are at least two problems with Saudi Arabia’s oil minister’s dream as he expressed it on television on Thursday: one, he doesn’t know what he’s talking about, and two, what he does know is wrong.

Mark Twain put it well: “It’s not what you don’t know that kills you. It’s what you know for sure that ain’t true.”

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister, Khalid al-Falih (shown), still thinks OPEC can impact the world oil markets the way they were able to just a few short years ago:

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Ethanol Mandates Mean Big Profits for Big Oil

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, October 28, 2016:  

When the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 was signed into law by then-President George W. Bush, it was well-intended: It would increase America’s oil independence and reduce dependence on foreign oil, it would produce cleaner air, and it would help farmers.

The Act required refiners to add ethanol to every gallon of gasoline they produced. If a refiner decided it couldn’t (too costly) or wouldn’t (internal decision) do so, it would be required to

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Candidates Silent as Government Spending Jumps, Deficit Increases

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, October 17, 2016:  

On Friday, the Treasury Department published the final revenue and spending numbers for the federal government for Fiscal Year 2016, which ended on September 30. According to Treasury’s report, spending increased significantly (by nearly five percent) over the previous year, to more than $3.8 trillion, while revenues remained essentially flat from the year before, at $3.25 trillion. That left a shortfall of approximately $600 billion, forcing the government to borrow 15 cents of every dollar it spent last year. And the two presidential candidates have remained disturbingly silent about the issue.

Said Robert Bixby, the executive director of the Concord Coalition, a non-partisan group that favors reducing the deficit,

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Override of Obama Veto Could Be Costly

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, September 29, 2016:

September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City: V...

The joy of the first override of one of President Barack Obama’s vetoes is likely to fade as its future negative impact on U.S. security and intelligence services is revealed. Conservative constitutional scholar Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) said nothing about this in his commendation of the Senate’s vote on Wednesday to override President Obama’s veto of JASTA — the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act:

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Would Trump’s Corporate Tax Cut Help the Economy?

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, September 28, 2016:  

 Removing the noise and the histrionics from Monday night’s presidential debate, there is a clear division between the two major-party candidates on the state of the economy and what to do about it.

The Democrat candidate said that the economy is on the mend, that jobs are being created, that real incomes have just recently increased, and that the outlook for the economy is sanguine.

The Republican candidate held the opposite view: after seven years the economy is still struggling, the recovery is the weakest in recent memory, and the outlook is bleak.

The Wall Street Journal noted that Trump’s case is the stronger,

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Murders Up Nearly 11% in 2015, Most in 20 Years

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, September 27, 2016:  

Statistics from the FBI’s report Crime in the United States, 2015, released September 25, confirm previous reports that the long decline in violent crime has ended. Murders in the United States in 2015 rose by 10.8 percent over the previous year, dwarfing any increases seen over the last 20 years. And the rise continues into 2016, with reported homicides up another 15 percent through June compared to the same period last year.

In June of 2015, BBC News reported that

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Fully Self-driving Cars by 2021, Says Ford CEO

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, August 18, 2016:  

On Tuesday, during a hectic day of media interviews about the coming revolution being caused by autonomous vehicles (AVs), Ford’s CEO Mark Fields told Wall Street analysts that such vehicles “could have just as significant an impact on society as [Henry] Ford’s moving assembly line did 100 years ago.” He told workers at a Ford plant in Palo Alto, “This is a transformational moment in our industry … it is a transformational moment in our company. We are making people’s lives better by changing the way the world moves.”

He said that his company’s foray begins with e-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft and will expand to the consumer market by 2021 if not sooner.

He’s not alone.

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Robots Are Taking Over Agriculture

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, January 29, 2016:  

The Fourth Industrial Revolution will soon allow a single factory to produce more than 30,000 heads of lettuce every day, using 98 percent less water, 30 percent less energy, and 50 percent fewer humans.

The Japanese grower Spread will open its Vegetable Factory next year using robots instead of humans not only to plant the seeds but

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A Black Swan Event and $4 Oil?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, November 20, 2015:  

Eight years ago Nassim Taleb’s book The Black Swan was named by the Sunday Times as one of the twelve most influential books since World War II. Now serving as Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering, Taleb continues to build on his view that “black swan” events have a greater impact on culture and the economy simply because they are unexpected. As Chris Anderson explains in his review of Taleb’s book:

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Study: Businesses, Taxpayers Fleeing High-tax States

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, September 10, 2015: 

Based on the latest data from the Internal Revenue Service, Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) concluded that, given the opportunity, taxpayers as well as businesses move from high-tax states to lower-tax states. In 2013, more than 200,000 people moved from New York, Illinois, California, Connecticut, and Massachusetts to Texas, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Arizona.

And they took with them more than

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Seattle Progressives Prove Certain Economic Laws Cannot Be Repealed

This article was published at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, August 14, 2015:  

Peter, Paul & Mary

By changing the meaning of the word “flowers” to “businesses,” the lyrics from Peter, Paul & Mary’s anti-war song applies perfectly to the new Seattle under its new minimum wage mandates: Where have all the businesses gone?

Where have all the flowers gone, long time passing?”
Where have all the flowers gone, long time ago?
Where have all the flowers gone?
Young girls have picked them everyone.
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

And when will Mayor Ed Murray and his gaggle of progressives who unanimously passed the anti-business, anti-employment minimum wage law last summer ever learn: you cannot fool Mother Nature, and you cannot repeal economic laws.

In Murray’s case the economic law still to be learned is:

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Seattle’s Minimum-wage Increase Starting to Cost Jobs

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, August 13, 2015:

Jodi Hall, owner of Cupcake Royale, a small th...

Jodi Hall, owner of Cupcake Royale

The Seattle city council mandate that business owners must raise the minimum wage they pay to their workers to $11 an hour (on the way to $15 an hour over the next few years) is already having its predicted effect: In the first six months of this year, 1,300 restaurant workers in the city have lost their jobs, according to the American Enterprise Institute (AEI).

In the single month of May, one month after the $11 mandate kicked in on April 1, 1,000 workers lost their jobs which, according to AEI economist Mark Perry, “was the largest one month job decline since … the [start of] the Great Recession.”

In simple terms, thanks to the progressives running the city council, Seattle restaurant workers are suffering their own recession.

To add salt to the wound, statewide (not including Seattle), restaurant employment has increased by 3.2 percent, adding 2,800 jobs over that same period.

This wasn’t supposed to happen,

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.