Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: Fourteenth Amendment

College Professors Have Their Incoherent and Illogical Lawsuit Tossed

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, July 12, 2017:

Littlefield Fountain and Main Building of The ...

Littlefield Fountain and Main Building of The University of Texas at Austin.

Three members of the 16,500 faculty of the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) became so incensed over the passage of Texas’ concealed carry on campus law that they decided, along with the assistance of a local Austin attorney, to file suit against everyone in sight to block its implementation scheduled for August 1. The district judge tossed it last week for lack of standing.

The lawsuit exposed not only the lack of standing, but the lack of understanding by the trio and their attorney, not only of the law, but the complete waste of time and Austin taxpayer money required for this frivolous complaint that resulted in nothing but bad publicity for the attorney and exposure of the silliness of professors with nothing better to do.

Hicks is a sole practitioner in Austin, while the three complainants were predictable liberals teaching at UTA:

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Texas Professors’ Frivolous Concealed-carry Lawsuit Tossed Due to Lack of Standing

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, July 11, 2017:  

When District Court Judge Lee Yeakel dismissed the frivolous lawsuit last week brought by three University of Texas professors against the state’s attorney general and numerous others, he claimed the trio had no standing. It’s also clear from the details that the professors also had no understanding of the issues involved. Instead they invoked conjecture over cogency, and the judge rightfully threw out the suit.

The three female professors — Jennifer Lynn Glass, Lisa Moore, and Mia Carter — with the help of a local attorney, made up their case against the law that allows concealed carry on the public campuses of Texas effective August 1. They feared that, somehow, armed students in their classrooms would

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NRA Moving from Defense to Offense

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, January 31, 2017:

For eight long years the National Rifle Association (NRA) has, along with similar groups such as the Gun Owners of America (GOA), the Second Amendment Foundation (SAF), and the National Association for Gun Rights (NAGR), largely been playing defense. The anti-gun executive orders spewing from the pen of former President Barack Obama, the anti-gun media seizing upon opportunities to promote its agenda thanks to crazed killers committing atrocities, the push to ratify the UN small arms treaty, and more have kept pro-Second Amendment groups such as these back on their heels.

No longer. Jennifer Baker, the NRA’s national spokeswoman, told The Hill on Monday:

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Massachusetts AG Busy Defending Her Unconstitutional “Enforcement Notice” on “Copycat” Assault Weapons

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, January 5, 2017:  

English: A M4A1 with SOPMOD package, including...

A M4A1 with SOPMOD package, including Rail Interface System and Trijicon 4x ACOG.

Even though Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey knew that her unilateral expansion of an 18-year-old law to ban anything that looked like an “assault weapon” was likely to be challenged, she went ahead with it anyway. On July 20 of last year, she imperiously announced her “enforcement notice” to every gun maker and dealer in the state:

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Driver Arrested for Remaining Silent, Sues Police and State

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, May 9, 2016:  

American Civil Liberties Union

At 9:30 p.m. on October 16, 2015, attorney Rebecca Musarra was driving in Warren County, New Jersey, when she was pulled over by two state troopers. Trooper Matthew Stazzone followed protocol and asked to see her driver’s license, her vehicle registration, and proof of insurance. While she was providing them, Stazzone asked, “While you’re looking for that, do you know why you’re being pulled over tonight?”

Musarra, aware of her right to remain silent, remained silent. Stazzone asked her again, “Do you know why you’re being stopped tonight?” Again, no answer.

Things then went off track. Stazzone said,

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National Reciprocity law: the Wrong way to do the Right Thing

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, May 18, 2015: 

P-64 (pistol)

Member of the House of Representatives Marlin Stutzman (R-Ind.) has let his enthusiasm run away from his good sense. For the third time in a row he has offered a bill giving power to the federal government to force the states into granting nation-wide “reciprocity,” so that anyone with a concealed carry permit, or a resident of a “permitless” state, can carry anywhere he wants in the country without repercussions. An identical bill was presented in the Senate by Senator John Cornyn (R-Texas).

Stutzman explained why:

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Dollree Mapp, Defendant in Landmark Fourth Amendment Case, Dead at 91

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, December 10, 2014: 

3,927 days Earl Warren from 1943 to 1953

Chief Justice Earl Warren

When Dollree Mapp answered the door on May 23, 1957, she had no idea of the impact her next move would have on jurisprudence in the United States. 

At her door were three local police officers who were searching for a suspect in a bombing, and they asked permission to enter her home, having been given information that he might be hiding there. She asked them if they had a search warrant. When they said no, she refused entry. 

Two officers left, leaving one behind to maintain surveillance. Three hours later the two officers returned, along with several others who demanded entry into her home. At that point, according to Supreme Court Justice Tom Clark, writing for the majority in Mapp v. Ohio, 

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High-school Students Told They Could No Longer Pray During School Free Time

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, November 14, 2014:

In his sophomore year at Pine Creek High School in Colorado Springs, Colorado, young Christian believer Chase Windebank decided to put his free time — formerly called “home room” but now called “seminar” time — to better use than many of his classmates. “Seminar” is an open time available to students on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays to do what they wish: play video games, hang out with their friends, consult with their teachers, and so forth. He gathered a few of his Christian friends and, with the permission of the choir teacher, used his empty room to pray, read the Bible, sing, and talk about the world about them from a biblical perspective.

Soon upwards of 90 students were attending these informal meetings without one single word of protest from other students or the administration.

On September 29 that all changed. 

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Judge: New Mexico 10 Commandments Monument Unconstitutional

This article was first published at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, August 11, 2014:

Bill of Rights Pg1of1 AC

Bill of Rights

James Parker, Senior District Court Judge for New Mexico, ruled last Thursday that the five-foot-tall, 3,000-pound monument inscribed with the 10 Commandments (shown) placed on the lawn in front of the Bloomfield, New Mexico, City Hall is unconstitutional. He ordered it to be removed by September 10.

Parker also expressed reservations about his decision, calling the case

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Incorporation Doctrine Leaves District Court Judge in Never-Never Land

This article was first published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, August 11, 2014:

Moses with the tablets of the Ten Commandments...

Moses with the tablets of the Ten Commandments, painting by Rembrandt (1659)

Judge James A. Parker of the District Court of New Mexico ruled against the tiny town of Bloomfield, New Mexico, last week, giving the city until September 20th to remove a five-foot-high, 3,000-pound monument celebrating the 10 Commandments from in front of its city hall.

The judge admitted that, thanks to incorporation and the resulting judicial confusion emanating from rulings that the Fourteenth Amendment applies the Bill of Rights to the states as well as to the federal government, he was on his own:

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Two Unanimous Supreme Court Decisions Grant Immunity to Police, Secret Service

Police Tape

Following the announcements on Monday of the Supreme Court’s unanimous decisions in two “qualified immunity” cases, John Whitehead, president of the Rutherford Institute, expressed dismay:

Not a day goes by without reports of police officers overstepping the bounds of the Constitution and brutalizing, terrorizing and killing the citizenry. Indeed, the list of incidents in which unaccountable police abuse their power, betray their oath of office and leave taxpayers bruised, broken and/or killed grows longer and more tragic by the day to such an extent that Americans are now eight times more likely to die in a police confrontation than they are to be killed by a terrorist.

This lawlessness on the part of government officials, an unmistakable characteristic of a police state, is made possible in large part by the courts, which increasingly defer to law enforcement and prioritize security over civil liberties. In so doing, the government gives itself free rein to abuse the law, immune from reproach, and we are all the worse off for it.

A closer look at the two cases to which Whitehead refers, however, reveals

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Latest Supreme Court Decision Already Impacting Prayers in Public Places

East Carolina University

East Carolina University (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, May 7, 2014:

On Thursday, May 1, an associate chemistry professor sent out his guidelines to his chemistry majors to use during their speeches upon graduation: 35 words max, and no mention of God. Here’s this from his email sent to his students at East Carolina University:

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The Supreme Court Passes on an Opportunity to Defend Freedom

Call to Action! National Defense Authorization...

Call to Action! National Defense Authorization Act (S.1867) Makes America a Police State! (g1a2d0077c1) (Photo credit: watchingfrogsboil)

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, May 2, 2014: 

Rarely does the Supreme Court have the opportunity to rectify major wrongs and mend egregious infringements coming from an out-of-control federal government: wrongs so outrageous that they threaten the very basis of society, so extreme that they risk emasculating and eviscerating the legal basis of an ordered existence, so far-reaching that they neutralize major amendments contained in the Bill of Rights.

On Monday, April 28, the Court had that opportunity, and they whiffed.

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Supreme Court Refuses to hear case Against NDAA Unlawful Detention

September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City: V...

September 11, 2001 attacks in New York City: View of the World Trade Center and the Statue of Liberty. (Image: US National Park Service ) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Within days of Congress reauthorizing the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) in January 2012, Brian Trautman summarized it perfectly:

This pernicious law poses one of the greatest threats to civil liberties in our nation’s history. Under Section 1021 of the NDAA, foreign nationals who are alleged to have committed or merely “suspected” of sympathizing with or providing any level of support to groups the U.S. designates as terrorist organization or an affiliate or associated force may be imprisoned without charge or trial “until the end of hostilities.”

The law affirms the executive branch’s authority granted under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) and broadens the definition and scope of “covered persons.”

But because the “war on terror” is a war on a tactic, not on a state, it has no parameters or timetable. Consequently, this law can be used by authorities to detain (forever) anyone the government considers a threat to national security and stability – potentially even demonstrators and protesters exercising their First Amendment rights.

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Requiem for a Courageous Everyman

20120429 - yardsale booty - Second Amendment s...

20120429 – yardsale booty – Second Amendment sign – IMG_4099 (Photo credit: Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL))

This article was first published at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, April 7, 2014: 

Few knew Otis McDonald. Fewer still knew how he became the lead plaintiff in the historical Second Amendment lawsuit McDonald v. Chicago, decided by the Supreme Court in 2010. With his passing from this life last Friday, one thing is certain:

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Otis McDonald, lead Plaintiff in McDonald v Chicago, passes at age 79

English: From top left: Downtown Chicago, the ...

English: From top left: Downtown Chicago, the Willis Tower, the Chicago Theater, the Chicago “L”, Navy Pier, the Field Museum, and Millenium Park (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Otis McDonald, a long-time Chicago resident and the lead plaintiff in McDonald v. Chicago, passed away on Friday, April 4. He was 79. It’s likely that he didn’t fully appreciate the impact the decision made by the Supreme Court in 2010 would have in the freedom fight in America. What is clear is that impact will continue to be felt for years to come.

Within two years of that decision, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled

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Why is Wyoming Suing New Jersey?

This article was first published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, March 12, 2014:

Why would Wyoming’s attorney general join with 18 other states’ attorneys general in asking the Supreme Court to review an obscure lawsuit in New Jersey? Part of the answer is the stark difference between the states in how they treat their citizens when it comes to rights

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The NRA, 19 States, 34 Congressmen sue New Jersey over its gun laws

On February 12, 2014, the National Rifle Association (NRA), 19 states and 34 members of the House of Representatives asked the Supreme Court to review a New Jersey court’s decision restricting Second Amendment rights of its citizens. Leading the requests is Attorney General of Wyoming, Peter Michael, who sees the danger in letting the decision by the 3rd District Court in New Jersey stand: it could require that every other state

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Appeal Filed in Court Decision Upholding Connecticut’s Gun Ban

When Rich Burgess, president of the pro-gun group Connecticut Carry, sent a memo on Monday to his membership, he said that Connecticut state officials “now look down the barrel of the laws that they created, and it is very probable that they now tremble as they rethink the extremity of their folly. Connecticut Carry calls on every official, every Senator, and every Representative, to make the singular decision: either enforce the law

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NYPD Surveillance of Muslims OK, Says Judge

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, March 3, 2014: 

When New Jersey District Judge William Martini threw out the complaint by some Muslims that New York City’s police department’s 10 years of surveillance had caused them economic pain and personal suffering, he used the “standing” argument: They didn’t have standing to bring the complaint in the first place. For standing to exist, the Muslims

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.