Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: Eurozone

Cyprus Deal Turns Bank Depositors into Lenders, Abolishes National Sovereignty

Late Sunday night the president of Cyprus, Nicos Anastasiades, was officially informed of the deal the unelected Eurogroup had come up with in order for Cyprus to receive its bailout from the European Central Bank. Anastasiades flew to Brussels on Sunday to meet with Mario Draghi, the president of the European Central Bank (ECB), Christine Lagarde, the managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and Jose Barroso, the president of the European commission. The meeting was run by Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European Council. On his way to the meeting, Anastasiades admitted that

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Gold Standard Arguments Being Promoted Again

Two years ago Steve Forbes, two-time candidate for nomination for president by the Republican Party and Editor of Forbes magazine, predicted “a return to the gold standard by the United States within five years … [because it would] help the nation solve a variety of economic, fiscal and monetary ills.” It’s now two years into his prediction and articles explaining how such a return would work, and why, are beginning

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More of America’s National Debt Being Bought by Foreign Governments

On Monday, December 17th, the US Treasury Department announced that China and Japan have increased their purchases of United States government securities despite concerns over the continuing negotiations about the fiscal cliff. Foreign holdings rose to $5.5 trillion in October, or about one-third of the country’s $16 trillion national debt. The increased interest in owning US government debt by foreign governments is welcome as the government’s monthly deficits continue growing at about $150 million every month. 

Although China is often referred to as the primary financier of America’s continuing profligacy, that country’s total holdings, some $1.16 trillion, represents just a little over 7 percent of the US’s national debt. Japan comes in at second place, owning $1.13 trillion, with Brazil holding $255 billion.

In contrast, two-thirds of the country’s national debt is owed by individual American investors and by Social Security and civil service and military pension plans. The balance of $1.6 trillion is owned by the Federal Reserve.

How much longer can such profligacy with its resulting trillion-dollar annual deficits continue? Back in 1995, Harry Figgie wrote Bankruptcy 1995 and predicted the end would occur within five years:

The good news and the bad is that neither we nor any other nation can continue the sin of deficit spending indefinitely. The laws of economics eventually exact their punishment, and we are dangerously close to getting ours.

Just as interest compounds in a savings account, it compounds on our debt. The $4 trillion debt we owed in 1992 becomes $6.56 trillion in 1995 and $13 trillion by the year 2000 just from the accumulation of deficits and interest alone.

Only a fool would contend that this insanity doesn’t have to end.

That was 13 years ago and yet that “day of reckoning” hasn’t arrived. Part of the reason is those “laws of economics” that resulted when interest rates were forced down by the Federal Reserve following the bursting of the dot.com bubble and have remained historically low ever since. That brought the cost of borrowing to record lows as well. For instance, the percentage of taxes that were devoted to interest payments on the national debt in 1991 was nearly 20%, but by 2003, it had declined to just over 8 percent. When compared to the country’s gross domestic product, interest was eating up just 1.4% of it. As Bill Sardi noted, “America was saved by cheap money.”

But with interest rates at near zero, how much longer will investors, foreign and domestic, continue to put up with such low returns in the face of an ever-increasing risk of default? Following the debt ceiling crisis during the summer of 2011, the rating agency Standard and Poor’s downgraded its rating on U.S. Government debt for the first time in history. And unless something positive comes out of the fiscal cliff negotiations, Fitch Ratings is likely to follow.

The Tax Policy Center, using rosy economic assumptions, projected that deficits would continue at least out to the year 2017, and would average $700 billion a year. As Sardi noted, “There is no substantiation for this scenario.” And so something’s got to give.

Indeed, if the average monthly deficits of $150 billion were simply extended in a straight line into the future, deficits over the next five years would add $9 trillion to the national debt, bringing the total to over $24 trillion by 2017.

There are several reasons why that “day of reckoning” may in fact be years away. For one thing, where else would China and Japan invest their surpluses? Name one country that boasts, at least on paper, a better credit rating than the US. With Germany and Japan in recession, and the Eurozone countries struggling to stay afloat, options for “safe” places to invest are limited.

Second, because at present the US dollar is the world’s reserve currency, there continues to be a demand for them no matter what they might be worth. Since Saudi Arabia must deal in dollars when selling the West their oil, there is a floor under that demand. And the recent drop in the price of oil shows, for the moment at least, that Saudi Arabia is happy with the arrangement.

And then there’s the Federal Reserve offering itself as the lender of last resort, announcing last week that it will continue to buy at least half of the government’s deficit for the foreseeable future.

The “day of reckoning” may instead occur in baby steps as the value of the American dollar continues its slow decay in purchasing power.

Despite the cries of worthies like Figgie and Sardi that the end is near, it may not be. The cross-currents of forces demanding further deficit spending are increasingly being met by demands for fiscal sanity will likely put off that “day of reckoning” for a long time, perhaps years into the future. That may indeed be enough time for those demands for sanity to be heard by enough in Washington to begin the sensible rebuilding of the country’s fiscal integrity, in which case the “day of reckoning” would happily never arrive.





Making Sense of Europe’s Nonsense

The official emblem of the European Parliament.

The official emblem of the European Parliament. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Anthony Wile is at it again. While most were caught up in the national election and the aftereffects of Hurricane Sandy and General Betrayus, Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, explained what the implosion in Europe is all about. In speaking to the European Parliament last Wednesday, she shed all cover and told all who would listen what’s really going on:

Of course the European Commission will one day become a government, the European Council a second chamber and the European Parliament will have more powers – but for now we have to focus on the euro and give people a little more time to come along.

Wile has been saying this for years. That’s part of why his blog has grown so rapidly: he sees with a view and an insight that truth seekers appreciate. Out of 644 million active websites  Alexa ranks www.thedailybell.com at 16,991 in the United States. More than 6,700 people come to his Switzerland-based website every day. And his readership has grown 60% just in the last three months.

He’s like the 500-pound canary: when he speaks, people listen!

He notes that the European Union was always, from the very beginning, designed with

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The Trouble with Outright Monetary Transactions

Mario Draghi presents his credentials as candi...

Mario Draghi presents his credentials as candidate ECB president (Photo credit: European Parliament)

Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank (ECB), spoke before Germany’s Parliament on Wednesday, defending his decision to purchase government bonds from member states needing financial assistance but without unleashing inflation. Similar to the Federal Reserve’s continuing attempts to stimulate the economy through the purchase of government securities, called Quantitative Easing, or QE, Draghi’s Outright Monetary Transactions, or OMT, “will not lead to inflation,” he claimed in the closed-door session. He said:

In our assessment, the greater risk to price stability is currently falling prices in some euro-area countries. In this sense, OMTs are not in contradiction to our mandate; in fact, they are essential for ensuring we can continue to achieve it.

This is utter nonsense, wrote Mish Shedlock, in his blog Global Economic Analysis. Since Draghi’s “mandate” is similar to that of the Federal Reserve — that is, to maintain price stability along with low unemployment — it’s impossible to increase the supply of money by buying government bonds with credits created out of thin air without eventually unleashing price inflation at the consumer level in the economy. Shedlock wrote:

The problem with such nonsense is you cannot break the law while screaming you are upholding it. Draghi now sounds and acts like hypocr[itical] US presidents of both political parties.

Both President Bush and President Obama (as well as the treasury departments under each administration) have shown little concern for the law. Increasingly presidents are of the mind [that] “we have to destroy capitalism [in order] to save it” or as President Bush stated and Obama practices: “ I’ve abandoned free-market principles to save the free-market system.”

What the members of the German Parliament wanted to hear was that Draghi would not be

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Quick! Who is the Most Powerful Person on the Planet?

English: EPP Congress Bonn: Podium discussion ...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mario Draghi. Who? According to Matthew Lynn, writing at MarketWatch.com, “measured by what [he] can actually do, the most powerful person will soon be the president of the European Central Bank, the Italian banker Mario Draghi.” He explains:

In the last few weeks, we have seen an extraordinary expansion of the European Central Bank’s powers. It can now set interest rates, control financial markets, and effectively dictate tax and spending policies across what remains — despite its current difficulties — the world’s largest single economic bloc.

To explain how this former Goldman Sachs executive  ascended to such a high perch in the world of international finance would take far more room than we have here. Suffice to say, the path to power has been under construction for decades, and deliberately planned, going all the way back to

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Austrian School Economics in Estonia

Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics

Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For many, Austrian school economics is theoretical nonsense. It’s nice to read about. It’s nice and logical. It’s common sense economics. But it really can’t apply to the real world. After all, with paper currency backed by nothing and central banks running the show, Austrian thinking is strictly theoretical.

Or maybe not.  Frank Shostak, a scholar at the Mises Institute, has uncovered something quite remarkable in Estonia:

Against the background of a severe economic crisis in the eurozone, one is surprised to find a member of the euro area that is actually showing good economic performance. This member is Estonia. In terms of so-called real gross domestic product (GDP) the average yearly rate of growth in Estonia stood at 8.4 percent in 2011 against overall eurozone performance of 1.5 percent. So far in 2012 the average yearly growth stood at 2.8 percent in Estonia versus -0.2 percent in the eurozone.

How about unemployment there?

Also note that the unemployment rate in Estonia displays a visible decline: it fell to 5.9 percent in August from 7.6 percent in January. In contrast, the unemployment rate in the eurozone climbed to lofty levels in August. After closing at 10.8 percent in January, the eurozone unemployment rate shot up to 11.4 percent in August.

One of the basic premises of Austrian economics is the “cleansing” process that must take place to

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“Fiscal Cliff” Already Slowing the Economy

English: A closeup of the fireball and mushroo...

Mushroom cloud (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Patrice Hill of the Washington Times makes a very good point:  the impact of the so-called “fiscal cliff” – Taxmageddon – is already being felt in the economy. People are frightened about the future, and so they are hunkering down.

And it’s no wonder. Here’s what the “cliff” looks like:

  • reductions in itemized deductions and personal exemptions
  • increases in taxes on capital gains and dividends
  • the marriage penalty returning
  • estate tax reinstated
  • increase in the payroll tax
  • cuts in unemployment benefits
  • child tax credit cut in half
  • 10 percent cut in military spending
  • 8 percent cut in discretionary government spending

And these are just a few of what happens on January 1st if Congress does nothing about them.

Please understand that this is not a plea for Congress to “do something”! It’s just an iteration of

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Spain’s Catalonia Region Demands Independence

Draft of New Statute of Autonomy for Catalonia...

Draft of New Statute of Autonomy for Catalonia of 2005 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Every September 11 the people of Catalonia, an independent region in northeast Spain, celebrate their “national day” — Diada — by taking the day off and parading through the streets of Barcelona. In past years the celebration was a festival used by some citizens as an excuse to get some fresh air, make some noise, and have some fun. This year, nearly one-quarter of the region’s seven million citizens used the celebration as an excuse to swarm into Barcelona to protest Spain’s austerity measures, which have raised unemployment in Catalonia — referred to locally as Catalan — to nearly 25 percent.

The immensity of the crowd far exceeded expectations so that parade routes had to be adjusted and parking places found for the more than 1,000 buses chartered to bring Catalans into the city. Most revelers were waving flags that said, “Catalonia: a new European state.” Said Alfred Bosch, a member of the Catalonian government:

All the flags I can see are the pro-independence flags of Catalonia with the lonely star right in the middle of the triangle.

And everybody is wearing these flags. I have never seen so many pro-independence flags in my all life.

Catalonia is a largely autonomous region of Spain with about 15 percent of the country’s population; it generates about 20 percent of Spain’s gross domestic product. It also pays more in taxes to Madrid than it receives in benefits. The fact that Spain levies taxes on Catalans and then sends only some of the money back to the region is galling, especially to those who

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Spain is Bleeding to Death

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard: Deposit flight from Spanish banks smashes record in July

Data from the European Central Bank shows that outflows from Spanish commercial banks reached [$92 billion] in July, twice the previous monthly record. This brings the total deposit loss over the past year to 10.9 percent [of deposits]…

Mariano Rajoy en Bilbao. Imagen tomada por Ike...

Mariano Rajoy en Bilbao. Imagen tomada por Iker Parriza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In any capitalist economy, bank deposits represent capital in liquid form. Spain is bleeding to death. Evans-Pritchard quotes another expert:

This is highly significant. Deposit outflows are clearly picking up and the balance sheet of the Spanish banking system is contracting.

This is called deflation: a contraction in the supply of money.

I give blood on a regular basis. But I’m only allowed to give one pint at a time, and I can’t go back in less than six weeks to give another pint. Once, when I was into bike racing, I was reminded by Penrose Hospital that it was time to give blood again. I waited until after the race was over. I wanted to be at my best.

The politicians in Spain don’t know about bike racing, and I have serious doubts about their understanding of capital flows. They’re much more interested in continuing to spend other peoples’ money without hindrance.

Says Evans-Pritchard:

The drip-drip of grim figures came amid fears of a constitutional crisis after the Spanish region of Catalonia requested a €5 billion rescue package yesterday from the central government but refused to accept any political conditions.

There it is in a nutshell: loan us more money so we can keep spending, but without conditions on the loan!

Evans-Pritchard reiterated:

Nothing can happen until Spain requests a loan package and signs a “memorandum” giving up fiscal sovereignty. It remains unclear whether Mr. Rajoy [Spain’s prime minister] will agree to this.

It’s the socialist mindset: only banks and governments can revive the sinking economy. Investors with their own funds in the banks see the lie, and are getting their money out while the getting is good.

Spain is bleeding to death.

Bailout of Spain Just a “Credit Line,” Says New Prime Minister

Mariano Rajoy

Following another last-minute late-weekend meeting of European Finance Ministers, Spain’s new Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy happily announced that not only was his country going to get more bailout funds than it needs, it’s coming without any strings attached. This is because, according to Rajoy, the new measures instituted since the victory of his People’s Party last November have been so effective in bringing common sense and prudent behavior back to the country’s financial markets. Those “radical” fiscal, labor-market, and financial-sector reforms that were instituted were the key, he said, adding,

If we hadn’t done this in these past five months, what was put forward [on Sunday] would have been a bailout of the Kingdom of Spain. Because we had been doing our homework for five months, what did happen…what was agreed, was the opening of a line of credit for our financial system.

There is no conditionality of any kind.

According to a report by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Spain needed at least $50 billion to rescue and recapitalize its banks. But the Finance Ministers decided to up the ante significantly, to $125 billion, just to be safe. Said Olli Rehn, the European Union’s top economist, “This is a very clear signal to the markets, to the public, that the Eurozone is ready to take determined action.” He added, “We deliberately wanted to ensure there is some additional safety margin…. This is preemptive action.”

What Rajoy failed to mention is that there are most certainly strings attached, and when

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Eurozone Teetering on the Edge of Recession

The economic growth of Portugal, Italy, Irelan...

With economists predicting the start of an official recession in Europe, the latest numbers from the European Union’s statistics agency, Eurostat, show that the recession hasn’t been confirmed, at least not yet.

Without Germany’s slightly better economic performance in the first quarter, however, the recession would be official. Two quarters of “negative growth”—or rather shrinkage—is the usual definition of a recession, and it appears that the official declaration will have to wait until July. Germany was expected to grow at a paltry annualized rate of 0.1%—barely perceptible—but instead grew by a modest 0.5% in the first quarter, which followed a 0.3% contraction in the last quarter of last year. Some economists had the audacity to call this a “strong economic performance” by Europe’s powerhouse, but a closer look at the real numbers reveals how close a call it was and that it’s just a matter of time before the economists finally recognize the reality that

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French Elections: Austerity, No! More Spending, Yes!

François Hollande à Saint-Cyr-sur-Loire

By a three-point margin, French citizens replaced President Nicolas Sarkozy with the Socialist and Radical Left Party candidate, Francois Hollande. Hollande, a former mayor of Tulle (pop. 15,000) and then president of Correze (pop. 242,000), beat Sarkozy 51.9% to 48.1%, resulting in the first Socialist president of France since Francois Mitterand left that office in 1995. With Socialist Party majorities in the upper house of parliament and two-thirds of all French towns, a win by the party in the upcoming June elections in the lower house would give the Socialist Party “more levers of power than ever in its 43-year modern history,” according to NewsMax.com.

With such control, Hollande knows exactly what he is going to do: apply what France is already suffering from, only more so. He wants to spend more money even in the face of the agreement recently signed with German Chancellor Angela Merkel to cut spending in order to save the banks and the euro. His campaign slogan, “Austerity is not inevitable,” Hollande is persuaded that he can do the impossible: spend more and balance the budget at the same time. He plans to:

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Amendment to End Energy Subsidies Fails in the Senate

Senator speaking at CPAC in .

Senator Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) introduced the Energy Freedom & Economic Prosperity Act (EFEPA) in February and then offered his bill as an amendment to the Transportation Bill last week. Had it passed it would have eliminated all energy tax credits not only for wind, solar, biomass and biofuels but for coal, oil and natural gas as well. Said DeMint:

Our tax code is riddled with loopholes for special interests and it’s time to end this corporate welfare that is hurting our economy. When Washington picks winners and losers in the energy market, those with the highest paid lobbyists win while the small businesses and taxpayers lose. We shouldn’t favor ethanol over hydrogen, nuclear over natural gas, or oil over renewables. The free market economy works when everyone competes on a level playing field and works to provide Americans with the best, lowest-cost products.

The original bill and the amendment were supported by a raft of free-market advocates including Americans for Prosperity, Club for Growth, Heritage Action and the National Taxpayers Union. In a letter to its members FreedomWorks urged them to pressure their senators to vote for the amendment, noting that “these subsidies have long distorted the market for new sources of energy by allocating funding to the technologies with the best lobbyists instead of those with the most value to consumers.”

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s study of subsidies to the energy industry completed last July, the federal government in 2010 gave out $37 billion of taxpayer monies, more than double the amount given away in 2007. Biofuels received $6.6 billion, wind received $5 billion, solar and biomass each received $1.1 billion, coal received $1.3 billion while oil and gas received subsidies of

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White House Jobs Growth Celebration is Premature

South façade of the White House, the executive...

White House announcements celebrating the jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) were optimistic: “Private sector employers added 233,000 jobs to their payrolls in February [which] means the economy has added jobs for 24 consecutive months…” This illustrates “the progress of the last two years and the importance of doing everything we can to continue strengthening our economy and creating jobs for the months and years ahead,” wrote Megan Slack on the White House blog. Alan Krueger, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors, was equally enthusiastic:

Today’s employment report provides further evidence that the economy is continuing to heal…. It is critical that we continue the economic policies that are helping us dig our way out of the deep hole that was caused by the recession…

MarketWatch.com joined with the White House in its analysis of the numbers: “By almost every measure the employment picture has brightened considerably…”

Unfortunately both sources were reading from the top line of the BLS report. A closer look would likely have dampened their enthusiasm. From that report, 

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Group of 20 Balks, Stalls and Dithers

Español: Foto de familia de líderes del G20 en...

The Group of 20 meeting in Mexico City over the weekend decided that the best course of action was inaction, putting off making any decisions on how to “rescue” the European Union from its financial and economic difficulties until next month at the earliest. The statement justifying kicking the can down the road for another month or so was breathtaking in its obfuscation: putting off any decisions, it said, “will provide an essential input in our ongoing consideration to mobilize resources…” This is how finance ministers and world economic experts explain that, after two days of meetings, the best thing to do was nothing at all.

There were great expectations before the meeting ended that something of substance would come out of it. The plan was not only to pave the way for the second bailout of Greece but for each of the G-20 members (including the U.S. and most of the other industrialized nations on the planet) to pony up additional taxpayer funds to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) which would then be used, at its discretion, to bail out over-indebted countries like Greece, Portugal, Spain, and others as they need them. Expectations were that commitments totaling $1 trillion would be made before the end of the meeting on Sunday.

Plans went awry when Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel, responding to pressure from more sensible voices, said Germany would be unable to participate in any further assistance. This reluctance no doubt stems from the fact that the German parliament, the Bundestag, still hasn’t

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The Greek Deal Saves the Banks

Map of Greece with EU flag

Following a 13-hour marathon session on Monday, eurozone ministers announced an agreement to loan Greece another $170 billion, which saves the banks while punishing private investors and damaging Greek national sovereignty.

The bailout brings the total spent or committed to save the eurozone countries of Greece, Ireland, and Portugal to $500 billion with little assurance that more won’t be needed very soon. Details of the agreement require that 90 percent of private bondholders agree to take a 53-percent haircut on their investments by exchanging old bonds for new. It requires acquiescence by Austria, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Slovenia to allow the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund to part with the funds. And it forces Greece to accept permanent and rigid enforcement of debt service payments by outsiders monitoring government revenues and expenditures and forcing debt service payments to be made ahead of any other government commitments.

The parties who come out whole on the deal are, naturally, the European Central Bank and other banks that hold Greek debt. Their holdings will be paid off at par.

Observers with chips in the game were decidedly guarded in their enthusiasm. Joerg Kraemer, chief economist at Commerzbank AG in Frankfurt, said, “Greece will find it difficult to shoulder even the

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Plans Revealed for Greek Default on March 23

March 25 - Greece Independence Day

Writer Bruno Waterfield’s claim that Germany has drawn up plans to deal with the inevitable Greek default was published in the British newspaper The Telegraph a little after 8 p.m. Saturday night. Within hours his claim was confirmed separately by blogger John Ward with times, dates, and consequences all spelled out by those drawing up the plans.

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schauble has increasingly voiced his opinion that the economic implosion taking place in Greece would result in its bankruptcy despite official protestations to the contrary from German Chancellor Angela Merkel. One official close to Schauble said, “He just thinks the Greeks cannot do what needs to be done. And even if by some miracle they did what has been promised, he…[is] convinced it will not pull Greece out of the hole.”

Schauble’s opinion gained increasing credence by a report issued last week by the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund (EC, ECB, and IMF—the “troika”). According to their report, even if Greece were successful in accomplishing all that it has promised in order to secure the next round of financing, it will still fall far short of bringing down its debt load to manageable levels. Waterfield went on to say that Schauble, behind the scenes, is pushing Greece to declare itself bankrupt and demand a 70 percent “haircut” from the banks holding the bulk of its debt.

The timetable is pushing events inexorably forward: Greece must receive the next round of financing in order to pay debt service of $20 billion on March 20. Without it the debt will default and government checks will start bouncing. But it will take at least four weeks to get a formal agreement on

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Eurozone Recession Accelerates; Moody’s Piles On

Board of Governors - International Monetary Fu...

Economists polled by Reuters predicted that the recession in Europe that began late last year would continue into the new year and they weren’t disappointed. Reuters announced that economic output in the 17-member eurozone declined by 0.3 percent in the last quarter of 2011, the sharpest since the second quarter of 2009 at the start of the recession. Those same economists are now predicting that European GDP growth will stay negative at least for the rest of the year with only modest chances of improvement in 2013.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has the same negative expectations, predicting at least a 0.5-percent contraction of the eurozone countries next year. Even Germany, long the anchor to windward and the engine of growth for the European community, went negative in the last quarter compared to its modest growth rate of 0.6 percent in the third quarter.

Investment banking firm ING admitted that the decline caught their forecasters by surprise. Carsten Brzeski said the economic contraction “turned out to be weaker than expected.”

The Netherlands declined into recession (defined as two quarters of declines in GDP, or “negative growth” in economic parlance) with its third quarter contraction of 0.4 percent followed by another 0.7 percent decline in the fourth. Italy’s economy dropped by 0.7 percent in the last quarter with little improvement expected for at least a year. This puts Italy into the same recessionary camp as Belgium, Portugal, and Greece.

Portugal may be looking for another bailout as its economy suffered at 1.3 percent decline in the fourth quarter, more than double the 0.6 percent decline from the third quarter.

But Greece is the basket-case poster child for economic performance, with a stunning

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European Fiscal Pact: Closing the Ring

Graphic "When Greece falls" presente...

Monday’s meeting of the European Union in Brussels resulted in agreement of 25 of the 27 member states to inflict upon themselves and their hapless and increasingly powerless citizenry the tools of international fiscal dictatorship.

The purpose of the “fiscal pact” is to enforce “budgetary discipline” so that the present euro crisis can be contained and future such crises averted. In the short run that means granting the European Central Bank (ECB) additional power to expand its reserves so that bailouts to failing countries can continue, subject to enforcement rules. In the longer run, the pact puts in place the primary tool of coercion, the European Stability Mechanism, to be effective in July.

European Council President Herman Van Rompuy said that initially the ESM will be limited to just €500 billion ($650 billion) but that the ultimate number “will be reassessed down the line.”

Critics say that’s the entire purpose of the ESM: to set up the mechanism of control under the guise of providing bailout funds to members in need while installing ruling class elites (bankers with ties to Goldman Sachs) out of reach of the taxpayer class. Angela Merkel, German Chancellor and mouthpiece for the ESM, was clear: “It is an important step forward to a stability union. For those looking at the union and the euro from the outside, it is very important to show this commitment.”

She failed to mention that Great Britain and the Czech Republic have both

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.

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