Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: Education

One More Reason to Remove Children from the Public Schools

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, November 13, 2015:  

Cornelius Van Til

Cornelius Van Til

For years Pastor Voddie Baucham of Grace Family Baptist Church in Springs, Texas, has been urging his flock, and anyone else who would listen (or read his blog, Exodus Mandate), to take their kids out of the public schools. He writes:

I am no fan of government education … I try to make Biblical, philosophical, and theological arguments in favor of Christian education as often as possible….


Our schools grow progressively (no pun intended) worse. As fall approaches, I want to appeal to those of you with children in government schools: please don’t send them back! I beg you to consider what you are doing.

He then outlines five reasons why:

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Colorado Sexting Scandal Is One of Many; and a Reason to Exit Public Schools

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, November 12, 2015:  

The district attorney investigating the sexting scandal at a Colorado high school and middle school in Canon City said it isn’t likely that he will press charges as there appeared to be few victims, just willing participants. Besides, under Colorado law, charges filed could lead to forcing those charged with having to file as sex offenders with permanent damage to their futures.

So many students were involved in the sexting ring that

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Where is This “Safe Space” Yale Students are Preparing for?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, November 11,2015:

English: "A Front View of Yale-College, a...

“A Front View of Yale-College, and the College Chapel, New-Haven, printed by Daniel Bowen from a woodcut.

Yale University adopted the first section of the Report of the Committee on Freedom of Expression at Yale back in 1975 as official policy, and has continued to abide by it, at least up until last Friday. Apparently, claims for a “safe space” for students is now the rule at Yale: no dissenting opinions, no contrarian points of view, no First Amendment rights.

Named for the committee’s chairman, C. Vann Woodward, the final paragraph of that now defunct policy reads:

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Detroit Report Card: Students Failing but Teachers “Highly Effective”

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, November 2, 2015:  

Detroit’s public schools have been a tremendous failure. Four emergency managers (one of whom, Roy Roberts, is shown above) have failed to reverse staggering enrollment declines … nor are the students learning what they should. Detroit Public Schools’ students are performing far below the state average in every area measured: math, reading, writing, science and social studies.

But while Detroit’s schools have been failing to give its students even the most basic skills needed just to exist in today’s society, its teachers have supposedly been doing very well. Out of 171 members of the “leadership corps” of the DPS — superintendents, assistant superintendents, administrators, principals, and assistant principals — only one was judged to be “ineffective,” with the others getting grades of “effective” or “highly effective.”

Tom Gantert at Michigan’s Mackinac Center wrote:

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The Upside-Down World of Detroit’s Public Schools

This article was published at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, November 2, 2015:  

Cover of "News from Lake Wobegon: Spring/...

Garrison Keillor has become an icon by reporting the news from Lake Wobegon on his radio show A Prairie Home Companion. He opens with, “Well, it’s been a quiet week in Lake Wobegon, Minnesota, my hometown, out there on the edge of the prairie.” He refers to it as “the little town that time forgot, and the decades cannot improve” while he closes his show with “Well, that’s the news from Lake Wobegon, where all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average.”

Charming but, of course, impossible. Just like Detroit’s public schools, which just celebrated the latest bad news from the Nation’s Report Card as unadulterated good news.

The Department of Education’s National Center for Education Services (NCES) just released its latest study of how Detroit’s students are performing:

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Thirty Years of Projecting the Lines

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, September 1, 2015:  

English: A composed satellite photograph of No...

This month marks the 30th anniversary of the The New American. On such an occasion, it is appropriate to reflect on the magazine’s track record, from the accuracy of our facts and the soundness of our analysis to the stories we unearthed and the influence we’ve exerted.

We are proud of our track record. But there is one recurring theme that seems to be particularly striking when reviewing the articles we’ve published, and that is the extent to which we have accurately projected the lines

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New Orleans Charter Schools Are Better, Not Perfect

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, August 25, 2015:  

Charter School of Wilmington students. Wilming...

Charter school students

Before Hurricane Katrina damaged or destroyed more than 100 of New Orleans’ 128 public schools in August 2005, Cohen College Prep (CCP) was one of the worst-performing schools in the city, with very few students graduating and fewer still being accepted into college. In the aftermath CCP was turned into a charter school, and now almost 100 percent of its students not only graduate but are accepted into college.

Results like this, appearing all across New Orleans’ charter schools, are leading many to conclude that this is Katrina’s “silver lining.”

Prior to Katrina,

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Tuition-Free Community College? Yea or Nay?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, June 8, 2015: 

Students at a table in Muscatine Community Col...

Students at a table in Muscatine Community College courtyard


In 2008 the city council of Knoxville, Tennessee created “Knoxville Achieves”, a philanthropically-funded free tuition program for lower income families who couldn’t afford college. It blended private funds with requirements that students receiving “last dollar” benefits (tuition expenses remaining after grants, scholarships and personal resources were used up) would be guided by volunteer mentors through regular consultations and planning sessions. If the students didn’t meet certain minimum performance standards, the mentoring stopped and so did the money.

This was a local response to the pitiful results, in general, that community college students were obtaining. Barely 20 percent of them obtain their associate’s degree after three years. It’s supposed to take two.

The first year 496 students received tuition assistance, with good results appearing almost immediately. It wasn’t the money – it was the mentoring and the tracking, following, and monitoring that made the difference. Students were, some for the first time, being held personally accountable to a friendly volunteer, along with receiving a financial incentive.

It worked so well that

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Proposed Federal Tuition-free Community College Likely to Be a Bust

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, June 8, 2015: 

Buried in the fine print of President Obama’s State of the Union speech last January was an idea that the federal government should make community college tuition-free. It’s loosely based on a Tennessee program that seems to be working without federal funding or intervention.

The federal program would add $6 billion to the government’s already bloated educational assistance programs, which already run $70 billion (not counting the $100+ billion in student loans) every year. Anything for the kids, it seems, and according to promoters, the taxpayers won’t feel a thing.

According to the federal program, an estimated nine million students attending community colleges could avoid up to $3,800 a year in tuition, with three-quarters of the largesse coming from Uncle Sam and the balance put up, under federal mandates, by the states. In his speech, Obama called community colleges “essential pathways to the middle class,” adding,

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“He Who Lives in a Glass House, Shouldn’t”

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, May 13, 2015:

English: U.S. Congressman

George Nethercutt


According to his own Wikipedia page, George Nethercutt touts himself as a “conservative.” After all, in the 1994 Republican landslide that gave the Republican Party control of the House for the first time in 40 years, Nethercutt replaced Speaker of the House Tom Foley. It was close: just 4,000 votes out of more than 215,000 cast. But that was enough.

In truth that meant that Nethercutt won by 2,000 votes, as that was the number of votes to be changed to allow Foley to keep his seat. Nethercutt’s promise that he would leave after three terms likely made the difference. After all, Foley had been representing Washington for 30 years as a hard left liberal Democrat, and voters had finally had a bellyful of him.

Unfortunately Nethercutt was in Washington, DC, long enough to drink the Kool-Aid of excessive hubris and self-importance, and when it came time for him to honor his promise,

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Int’l Tests Show U.S. Students Poor in Math, Civics, Literacy

The recent flurry of test results on how American students are faring in school has resulted in much commentary decrying their dismal performance compared to their international peers.

The PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) study recently released by the National Center for Education Statistics compared the performance of 15-year-old students among 65 countries, including all 34 member countries of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and confirmed what was already widely known: U.S. students are nowhere near the top in math, science, or literacy. Twenty-nine educational systems turn out better students than does the United States in mathematics, while students in 22 systems were more capable in science than were U.S. students. In reading literacy 19 educational systems turned out more skilled students than the U.S. public school system.

Eighth-graders participating in the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) test given under the auspices of the Department of Education showed no significant improvement over their dismal performance recorded four years ago. Just 18 percent of them scored at or above the Proficient level in U.S. history, while 27 percent scored Proficient in geography, and 23 percent reached or exceeded that level in civics.

The latest from Pew Research — “What the Public Knows” — showed that

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Tax-credit Private-school Scholarship Funding Explodes in Oklahoma

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, March 24, 2015:

Many Oklahoma taxpayers are paying less in state income taxes, thanks to contributions made to scholarship granting organizations (SGOs) last year.

It’s a new wrinkle, and many of those opening envelopes from the Oklahoma Tax Commission are in for a pleasant surprise. A single taxpayer contributing $2,000 to an SGO last year will save $1,000 in state income taxes. A couple contributing $4,000 will save $2,000. These are credits, not deductions, based on one-half the contribution. Translation: Every dollar of credit saves one dollar in state taxes.

For those able to give more — think successful small business owners, lawyers, accountants, physicians, software engineers, farmers, ranchers, and other business owners operating as regular C corporations — that letter in the mail this month could generate even greater excitement.

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A Billion Dollars to Elect Good Conservatives?

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Thursday, January 29, 2015:

The assumption behind raising and spending a billion dollars, as the Koch brothers Charles and David seem to support, is that with enough money, enough grassroots action, and sufficiently elegant voter software, election successes like that of last November can be repeated in 2016. This past weekend, Freedom Partners, the Koch’s equivalent to a chamber of commerce for wealthy conservatives (each of its 200 members pays a minimum of $100,000 in annual dues), announced at its Palm Springs winter meeting that it was going to raise $900 million to pour into the upcoming presidential election.

Part of the money would go into advertising,

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Koch Brothers’ Network to Spend $900 Million on 2016 Elections

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, January 27, 2015: 

Spokesmen for Freedom Partners, the Koch Brothers-funded “chamber of commerce” and sponsor of their annual winter meeting in Palm Springs, announced last weekend that its network of over 200 wealthy conservatives is planning on raising nearly $900 million to invest in the 2016 elections. This is more than double what the network raised and spent during the 2012 presidential campaign, and exceeds what both political parties spent that year put together. 

Freedom Partners is building on the momentum from the November elections that gave Republicans control of the Senate and expanded their majority in the House of Representatives. As Freedom Partners President Marc Short remarked, “2014 was nice but there’s a long way to go.” He noted that his group’s ultimate goal is to make the ideals of a free market “central” in American society, adding, “Politics is a necessary means to that end.” Freedom Partners invested more than $400 million in those midterm elections. 

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Internet Freedom Shrinking, Says the Freedom House

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, January 5, 2015:

Mark Twain

Mark Twain

Excitement over the positive impact the Gutenberg Press had on freedom led Mark Twain to exclaim:

What the world is today, good and bad, it owes to Gutenberg. Everything can be traced to this source, but we are bound to bring him homage … for the bad that this colossal invention has brought about is overshadowed a thousand times by the good with which mankind has been favored.

More than two hundred years later, Andrew Wile, blogging at The Daily Bell, was equally ebullient, this time about the Internet – Gutenberg 2.0 – saying:

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Putin Demands All Data About His Citizens Be Stored Inside Russia

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, January 5, 2015:


On December 31, 2014, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed the latest version of his country’s “personal data law” that, starting September 1, 2015, will require all companies to store data about Russian users only on computer servers inside the country. That way, according to the New York Times, “it will be easier for the government to get access to it.”

Whether those companies — Facebook, Twitter, and Google, among others — will comply is an open question. When Putin’s Internet “regulator” Roskomnadzor demanded that Facebook take down a page promoting a rally in support of political activist Alexei Navalny (whom the Wall Street Journal called “the man Vladimir Putin fears most”), Facebook complied. But within hours dozens of copycat pages popped up elsewhere, creating even more publicity for the January 15 event. 

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Latest Survey: Farmers Disagree With Manmade Climate Changers

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, November 28, 2014:


Scientific studies on climate helped establish...

Scientific studies on climate helped establish a consensus. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Given the national media’s foregone conclusion that the climate change debate is over, there is little likelihood that Linda Prokopy’s latest survey challenging the climate change consensus will receive any air time, regardless of her credentials.

Prokopy is an associate professor of Natural Resource Social Science at the establishment Purdue University, and she has all the credentials, educational background, and publishing credits that one would need to get national attention and respect. But only, it appears, if her conclusion lends support to the establishment meme that man is causing climate change and something must be done now!

She had the audacity to


survey farmers and scientists directly involved in the agricultural sector and to ask them what they thought about that meme. Of the 173 scientists and climatologists she included in her survey, a very predictable 90 percent of them believed that climate change was happening, with half of them blaming it on human activities, like farming.

However, of the 4,778 corn producers she and her fellow researchers surveyed, only 66 percent said they thought the climate was changing, and just eight percent blamed humans. A quarter of them said they believed climate change resulted from natural causes, with another third holding that there wasn’t enough evidence to prove the point either way.

She summarized the survey, saying:

Results reveal that agricultural and climate scientists are more likely to believe that climate change is mostly due to human activities than farmers and advisers….


This discrepancy in beliefs creates challenges in communicating climate science to [the farmers and their advisers].

When the Media Research Center (MRC) got hold of her survey, they put it in terms of the debate they have weighed in on for decades. Founded in 1987 by conservative author and activist Brent Bozell III, MRC’s stated mission from the first was to “prove — through sound scientific research — that liberal bias in the media does exist and undermines traditional American values.” Writing for MRC, Susan Long expressed surprise at its findings:

While 90 percent of scientists and climatologists surveyed thought the climate was changing, only about 50.4 percent contended that humans were the primary cause….


This evidence is inconvenient to the many media outlets that have endlessly repeated that 97 percent of scientists endorse the global warming hypothesis. Prominent outlets like NBC and the New York Times, as well as countless others, have effectively shut down debate by asserting [that] there is no scientific debate.

With no effective debate, of course, the media becomes a mouthpiece for what supports their agenda: Government must fix this or we will all die! Left alone, of course, is any serious discussion of exactly what “climate change” now means, having morphed from the inconveniently limiting phrase “global cooling” and from there to “global warming.”

The phrase: “If you would converse with me, define your terms” has been attributed to John Locke, but what Locke actually wrote in 1689 is revealing and pertinent:

The names of simple ideas are not capable of any definition; the names of all complex ideas are. It has not, that I know, been yet observed by anybody what words are, and what are not, capable of being defined; the want whereof is (as I am apt to think) not seldom the occasion of great wrangling and obscurity in men’s discourses….

Without definitions of complex ideas, then, readers are left with conclusions often based upon error: finely crafted, persuasively presented, and logically apparently unassailable, especially if they are repeated endlessly.

H. L. Mencken, author of Prejudices in 1920, put the matter more succinctly: “Explanations exist: they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.”

For some, such as Michael Mann, a climate-changer who says he has studied the world’s temperature record for the past 1,000 years (!) and who then published his findings using his famous “hockey stick” graph, there is no dissent. If dissent rears its ugly head, Mann is there to lop it off. Last January, Mann wrote in the New York Times:

The overwhelming consensus among climate scientists is that human-caused climate change is happening. Yet a fringe minority of our populace clings to an irrational rejection of well-established science.


This virulent strain of anti-science infects the halls of Congress, the pages of leading newspapers and what we see on TV, leading to the appearance of a debate where none should exist.

Notice his choice of words which serve to define the character of those questioning the meme: “fringe,” “clings,” “irrational,” virulent strain,” and “infects,” each of which is clearly defined and serves as his response to surveys such as Prokopy’s of Purdue University. This is his alternative approach to responding to adverse opinions with sound reasoning and respectful dignity. It is, with apologies to Samuel Adams, “the last refuge of a scoundrel,” or what is used when the defender of false beliefs runs out of answers.

Consider efforts by Marc Morano, who served as communications director for the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. In 2007 he published a minority report titled “Over 400 Prominent Scientists Disputed Man-Made Global Warming Claims,” which he updated later to “over 700 scientists” and then to “more than 1,000 scientists.” Instead of responding to the doubters by examining their data and conclusions, Morano’s enemies launched ad hominem attacks against him. He was called a “hired assassin” who “spreads lies about scientists.” He was labeled the “Climate Change Misinformer of the Year” in 2012 by Media Matters, and his career was portrayed as “a lesson in the art of lying” by the German magazine Zeit.

Merely by surveying farmers and their advisers about what they think of the “climate change” meme, Professor Linda Prokopy may unwittingly have put her career in serious jeopardy, if the media bothers with it at all. After all, farmers are far too close to the subject to have any opinion on the matter of man-made climate change.

Obama’s Poll Numbers Continue to Drop

This article was first published at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, September 17, 2014:

English: In January 2009, President of the Uni...

In January 2009, President of the United States of America, George W. Bush invited then President-Elect Barack Obama and former Presidents George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter for a Meeting and Lunch at The White House.

With the midterm elections less than seven weeks away, pollsters are coming out of the woodwork expressing their opinions on the outcome on November 4. The latest CBS News/New York Times poll, focusing on President Obama’s handling of the ISIS crisis and terrorism and foreign policy in general, shows him not only setting new personal lows, but lows never before recorded by the survey:

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Truancy Laws Snag 13-year-old Piano Prodigy

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, September 10, 2014:

It took just one day for the chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) to respond to Petula Dvorak’s column in the Washington Post on Monday. Chancellor Kaya Henderson issued a public statement condemning Dvorak’s column for inaccuracies and claiming instead that she was working with Avery Gagliano’s parents to avoid charging the 13-year-old piano prodigy with truancy.

Gagliano was one of just 12 musicians selected from around the world to

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Common Core Gooses Homeschooling

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, September 10, 2014:


A mother and her homeschooled daughter, studyi...

A mother and her homeschooled daughter, studying in the kitchen about household chemicals and the hazard warning labels(flammability, reactivity, etc )http://www.flickr.com/photos/vr/1253261487. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This time the headline underreported the news. From the Charlotte NewsObserver came this: “Homeschooling rate Accelerates in North Carolina.” A better headline would have read: “Homeschooling goes Exponential in North Carolina.” In 1985, the year that homeschooling was legalized in the state, there were about 2,300 home-schooled students. Two years ago there were 77,300 home-schooled students, which jumped to 85,900 last year. This year the number is closing in on 100,000, a gain of 27% in just two years. At that rate there will be more than 200,000 homeschooled students in North Carolina in less than five years. That’s exponential, with a vengeance.

It’s not surprising, given the federal pressure to adopt Common Core standards and curricula across the land. The greater the pressure, the greater the desire to opt out. Said Beth Herbert, founder of Lighthouse Christian Homeschool Association, “Common Core is a big factor that I hear people talk about. They’re not happy with the work their kids are coming home with. They decided to take their children home.”

Kelly Swinney, a retired homeschool mom, was much more direct: “Common Core is bad, plain and simple. It’s a one-size-fits-all program and kids just aren’t that way.” The pressure to opt out of Common Core has reached North Carolina’s General Assembly which just voted in July to create a commission to figure out how to do it.

Similar numbers are coming in from Freedom Project Education (FPE), backed by the John Birch Society. In three years the number of students in its K-12 program, based on the Constitution and free market economics, has grown from 22 to more than 700. Alan Scholl, director of FPE, told this writer that he had to turn back 130 additional students who asked to be enrolled after the August deadline had passed. He estimates that his school will have 1,000 students next fall, a gain of 4,500% in three years.

When asked how much of that was due to people trying to escape the clutches of Common Core, Scholl said: “At least half!”

Even before Common Core entered the classroom, parents were increasingly disenchanted with what was going on in their children’s schoolrooms. They didn’t like their school’s environment, the quality of the academic teaching, the curriculum that was increasingly dumbing the kids down while leaving out critical parts of American history, the bullying, the inevitable peer pressure to conform, and the lack of moral or religious instruction. They were tired of hearing how homeschooled students were outperforming their kids in every discipline. According to the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA), the average homeschooled student outperformed his public school peer by between 30 and 38 percent across all subjects. This was confirmed by Education News, which noted that “Homeschooling statistics show that those who are independently educated typically score between the 65th and 89th percentile on the [standardized assessment] exams, while those attending traditional [public] schools average at the 50th percentile.”

And when they hit college, they outperform their peers there as well. As Dr. Michael Cogan of the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota noted in 2010, homeschooled students going to college achieve a higher first-year GPA than their peers, and that advantage is retained all the way through their college experience. In addition they have a higher graduation rate when they complete their studies.

And when they graduate from college, homeschoolers are much more active and involved in their communities, such as coaching a sports team, volunteering at a school, or working with a church or neighborhood association. In addition they are much more likely to be involved in political and civic affairs and vote at a much higher percentage than their peers. According to the National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI): “76% of those surveyed between the ages of 18 and 24 voted within the last five years, compared with only 29% of the corresponding US populace. The numbers are even greater in older age groups, with voting levels not falling below 95%, compared to the high of 53% for the corresponding US populace.”

But it’s the pressure to conform to Common Core standards that have turbocharged the homeschool movement. The Common Core standards came about when Bill and Melinda Gates first began funding their vision for national education standards with their grant to the James B. Hunt Institute. So far the Gates have given more than $27 million as seed money, which led to the development of the Common Core Standards State Initiative and the Council of Chief State School Officers, two Washington, DC-based trade organizations. As noted at the FPE website:

In brief, each of the 50 states has been bribed by the federal government to accept the copyrighted and thus unalterable Common Core standards – even though most Americans have no idea what they entail – by offering those states millions….

To date, 46 states have accepted Common Core money, ceding curricula control to the federal government and taking it away from parents, teachers, and local school boards. Beyond the educational mediocrity the Common Core standards will further enshrine in public schools, there are elaborate plans to use the required national assessments within the Common Core standards as a tool to institute massive data collection about American schoolchildren that has nothing to do with education, and everything to do about government intrusion and control.

Emile Zola put it very well:

If you shut up the truth and bury it under the ground, it will but grow and gather to itself such explosive power that the day it burst through it will blow up everything in its way.

So it is with Common Core and the exponential response from parents who are increasingly aware of the danger and who want to see that their kids get a good education. Coupled with online schooling through the Internet, these concerned parents are increasingly opting out by doing it themselves and teaching their kids at home.



Charlotte NewsObserver: Home schooling rate accelerates in North Carolina

Daily Signal: In One State, More Children Homeschool Than Attend Private Schools. Why That Shouldn’t Shock You.

Home Schooling

Home Schooling in the US

Education News: Number of Homeschoolers Growing Nationwide

The New American: Homeschooling Continues to Grow in Popularity Nationwide

FPE: What is Common Core?

National Home Education Research Institute (NEHRI)


Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.

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