Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: Crime

As Expected, Former Florida Democrat Congresswoman Convicted of Fraud

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, May 12, 2017:

English: Official Congressional portrait of Co...

Official Congressional portrait of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown.

After 11 hours, the jury hearing the case against former Florida Democrat Representative Corrine Brown reached a verdict on Thursday: guilty on 18 out of 22 charges filed against her in federal court. The jury convicted her of conspiracy, five counts of mail fraud, seven counts of wire fraud, one count of scheming to conceal material facts in the case, one count of obstruction of justice, and three counts of tax fraud.

As The New American reported on the case last year, Assistant U.S. Attorney General Leslie Caldwell provided some of the details:

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Disgruntled Professor Quits, Using Concealed Carry in His Classroom as His Excuse

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, May 12, 2017:

English: Holster for Glock pistol Svenska: Höl...

In a fit of pique, KU associate professor Jacob Dorman decided to burn his bridges behind him when he left the faculty last week. Instead of packing up in the middle of the night, he chose instead to have his resignation letter published in the Topeka Capital-Journal. It was an infantile move that he is likely to regret for years to come.

He used Kansas’ new constitutional carry freedom as cover:

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KU Professor Quits Over Concealed Carry in his Classroom

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, May 11, 2017:

An associate professor of history and American studies at the University of Kansas (KU) loudly announced his departure from the faculty after 10 years by having his resignation letter published on May 5 by the Topeka Capital-Journal. Wrote associate professor Jacob Dorman:

In light of the state of Kansas’ apparent determination to allow the concealed carry of firearms in the classrooms of the University of Kansas, I am writing to tender my resignation effective two weeks from today as an associate professor of history and American studies at the university. I have accepted a job in a state that bans concealed carry in classrooms.

This was no “apparent determination” by state legislators. For years the issue of constitutional carry has been debated in Topeka and under a compromise bill the issue of concealed carry by students on campus was resolved by allowing them to carry concealed effective July 1.

But according to Dorman, this new freedom somehow weakens the education those 28,400 students are currently getting at KU’s five campuses (Lawrence, Kansas City, Overland Park, Wichita, and Salina):

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It’s Official: Ferguson Effect Causing Police to “De-police”

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, May 5, 2017:  

The famous "black and white" LAPD po...

The saying “when seconds count the police are minutes away,” while somewhat dismissive of the utility of police, nonetheless assumes that when the police arrive, they’ll be able to resolve an incident effectively and efficiently. Now comes the FBI suggesting that when the police arrive they might not want to.

It’s called the Ferguson Effect,

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John Lott Proves His Premise is Correct Once Again

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, May 5, 2017: 

The premise of John Lott’s book, More Guns, Less Crime, now in its 3rd edition, is this: when a criminal doesn’t know if his potential target is armed, he reconsiders. When he is assured that his target is defenseless, he has much less reason to do so.

Lott puts it this way:

Criminals as a group tend to behave rationally – when crime becomes more [risky], less crime is committed.

That means that

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John Lott: Half of All U.S. Murders Happen in Just Two Percent of Counties

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, May 4, 2017: 

Cover of "More Guns, Less Crime: Understa...

In 2014, the latest year for which sufficient data is available, half of all murders in the United States took place in just 63 U.S. counties — two percent of the 3,144 counties in the country. Two-thirds of all murders that year happened in 157 counties — five percent. On the other hand, according to John Lott, the author of the study by his Crime Prevention Research Center, more than half had no murders at all.

This disproportionality has skewed the statistics. Anti-gun politicians often use the United States’ overall violent crime rate as an excuse to impose more gun laws on the populace. But when the worst five percent of U.S. counties are removed from the equation, the nation’s overall murder rate of 4.4 per 100,000 people drops to 2.56.

Lott noted further in his study that

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North Dakota Demands U.S. Taxpayers Pay for Pipeline Protest Cleanup

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, May 2, 2017:  

When the last of the pipeline protesters were removed, some by force, from the Dakota Access campsites in late February, Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier thought that would be the end of it, and folks could get back to their regular lives:

I am very happy to say that we finally introduced [the] rule of law in the Oceti camp. I am hopeful that this announcement brings us closer to finality in what has been an incredibly challenging time for our citizens and law enforcement professionals. Having dealt with riots, violence, trespassing and property crimes, the people of Morton County are looking forward to getting back to their normal lives.

Except for the bills.

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Senator Ted Cruz Introduces Bill to Have Drug Lord El Chapo Pay for the Wall

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, May 1, 2017: 

When Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) introduced his bill — the Ensuring Lawful Collection of Hidden Assets to Provide Order (EL CHAPO) Act — on Tuesday, he said the $14 billion seized from the Mexican drug lord would help build President Trump’s wall:

$14 billion dollars will go a long way toward building a wall that will keep Americans safe and hinder the illegal flow of drugs, weapons, and individuals across our southern border.

The money isn’t available just for the taking, added Cruz:

The U.S. government is currently seeking the criminal forfeiture of more than $14 billion in drug proceeds and profits from El Chapo, the former leader of the Sinaloa drug cartel who was recently extradited to the U.S. to face criminal prosecution for numerous alleged drug-related crimes, including conspiracy to commit murder and money laundering.

As part of the agreement between Mexico and U.S. authorities, El Chapo won’t face the death penalty, but his confiscated assets might be available if Cruz’s bill passes the Senate and the House, and is signed into law by the president. Confiscated assets such as these are usually directed to law enforcement efforts in the United States.

Cruz told Tucker Carlson on Fox News’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Wednesday that it’s “only fitting” that drug money be used to build the wall:

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Is History About to Repeat Itself – Building the Wall to Keep Drugs Out?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, May 1, 2017:

Cover of "Last Call: The Rise and Fall of...

As Samuel Taylor Coleridge expressed it, “If men could learn from history, what lessons it might teach us! But passion and party blind our eyes, and the light which experience gives us is a lantern on the stern which shines only on the waves behind.”

Those unfamiliar with the lessons history teaches regarding attempts to legislate morality are about to get another one. One of those, surprisingly, is the Republican Senator from Texas who has just introduced a bill to let El Chapo pay for the wall. After all, said Ted Cruz, it’s “only fitting.” Cruz told Tucker Carlson on Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Wednesday:

These drug cartels are the ones crossing the border with impunity, smuggling drugs, smuggling narcotics, engaged in human trafficking. They’re the ones violating our laws and it’s only fitting that their ill-gotten gains fund securing the border.

Cruz’s bill specifically targets El Chapo’s assets for use in building the wall:

All illegally obtained profits resulting from any criminal drug trafficking enterprise led by Joaquin Archivaldo Guzman Loera (commonly known as “El Chapo”), which are criminally forfeited to the United States Government as a result of the conviction of [El Chapo] … shall be reserved for security measures along the border between the United States and Mexico, including the completion of a wall along such border, for the purpose of stemming the flow of illegal narcotics into the United States and furthering the Nation’s security.

Cruz sounded very much like another member of Congress who hasn’t read, or remembered, his history: Rep. James Sensenbrenner. In March Sensenbrenner offered his bill, cleverly titled the BUILD WALL (Build Up Illegal Line Defenses With Assets Lawfully Lifted) Act, explaining:

If we do nothing, we put the people of this nation at risk, as well as allow illegal immigrants to take away jobs, opportunities, and social funding from U.S. citizens – all at the expense of the American taxpayer. The BUILD WALL Act is a creative solution to a complex problem.

When quizzed about his bill in March, Sensenbrenner reiterated the case that drug lords should rightly pay for the wall:

This is a way to fulfill the president’s desire to have Mexico pay for the wall. Having the money seized from Mexican drug cartels would mean that bad Mexicans would end up paying for the wall – the bad Mexicans [who] have been terrorizing the good Mexicans with crime and kidnappings and murders within Mexico itself.

But why is no one asking the real question: if the wall is built, will it work in keeping drugs and criminals out of the United States? Or will it, just like the Volstead Act, cause misery beyond measure, with consequences still being felt today nearly a hundred years later?

Films over the last few decades have attempted to answer that question, films such as The Untouchables (1987) or, more recently, Lawless (2012) which just touch on the horrors inflicted upon innocents as those illegal liquor merchants plied their wares, operating as simply businessmen doing their best to “meet a demand.”

As Borderland Beat, the relatively unknown but highly-regarded source of information about the border drug wars, recently noted: “With U.S. support Mexican authorities have been able to kill or capture 33 out of the 37 most dangerous cartel leaders. The recent extradition of Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman to the United States is a testament to the value of high-level cooperation between the two countries. As a result of these notable successes, several larger cartels have fractured and have descended into in-fighting.”

But they haven’t gone away. That have reorganized, are adapting to the new reality, and continue their drug trafficking. First, they consider themselves as businessmen providing a product to meet market demand. Thwarting border protections is an industry in its own right, whether it’s developing tunnels (with electric lights, air-conditioning and motion sensors) under the border, or creating false documentation to get their mules through border checkpoints. They still have immense resources and can buy all the talent they need to counter any protective schemes the Trump administration might dream up.

When they wish to move large sums of cash across the border, the cartels have used “cloned” vehicles that resemble official cars. When that fails, they buy up and ship across the border vast numbers of gift cards, thus reducing law enforcement’s ability to track down the movement of money.

When drones become pesky, they develop countermeasures to defend against them. And they are developing “narco drones” of their own to deliver drugs across the border to the U.S.

In addition, they have the resources to bribe successfully hundreds of Department of Homeland Security employees who have taken in nearly $15 million in bribes since 2006. As Borderland Beat notes, all of this means “that a new border wall will not end or significantly reduce the capabilities and power of Mexican drug cartels. From the days of tequila smuggling into the United States during Prohibition, illicit trafficking across the southwest border has remained a constant.”

As Kyle Smith wrote in his review of “Prohibition,” a PBS special a few years ago:

Banning the sale or manufacture of alcohol made ours “a nation of scofflaws,” as Burns and Novick entitle the second episode of their miniseries. After an initial dip in alcohol consumption, booze sales spiked, with one cop estimating there were 32,000 speakeasies in New York City.

 

No one who backed the 18th Amendment thought much about the additional police needed to enforce it, the ease with which those police would be bought off, the job losses it would cause, or the innocent bystanders who would be shot when the government decided to crack down.

 

Prohibition lessened respect for the rule of law and created a big business in bootlegging, which in turn led to murder and mayhem on the streets. Organized crime barely existed before the Al Capones of the world found their calling in Prohibition, and in order to lessen turf wars the gangland bosses began to carve out spheres of influence on a nationwide scale.

 

“Prohibition was the finishing school, the college and the graduate school for the criminal syndicates of America,” says Dan Okrent, author of “Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition,” in the film.

If the wall is built (regardless of who pays for it), people like Cruz and Sensenbrenner (and others who should know better) are very likely to learn this lesson from history: one cannot legislate morality, and attempts to do so are likely to have painfully negative and long-lasting consequences. Unfortunately, Coleridge’s lantern, for many, shines only on the waves behind.


Sources:

History quotes

The New York Post: What we learned from Prohibition

Fox News: Sen. Ted Cruz: ‘It’s only fitting’ cartel money be used for border wall

Washington Examiner: Jim Sensenbrenner: Make Mexican cartels pay for the wall

Borderland Beat: THE BORDER WALL: MAKING MEXICAN DRUG CARTELS GREAT AGAIN

Background on Borderland Beat

Conservative Tribune: Congressman: Pay for Border Wall by Seizing Money From Mexican Drug Cartels

CNNOfficial: Mexican cartels use money, sex to bribe U.S. border agents

Breitbart: Ted Cruz Calls for $14 Billion Seized from ‘El Chapo’ to Fund Border Wall

Text of Cruz’s bill, S.939

The Untouchables (1987)

Lawless (2012)

Trump Gives “Never, Ever” Speech to NRA National Convention

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, April 28, 2017:

In less than 30 minutes, President Donald Trump hit all the hot buttons, feeding red meat to thousands attending the National Rifle Association’s national convention in Atlanta on Friday.

Trump, the first sitting president to address the NRA convention since President Ronald Reagan in 1983, began by voicing his appreciation to the NRA and its membership for its and their early and generous support of his presidential campaign. The NRA first endorsed Trump for president in March 2016 and subsequently pumped $30 million into his campaign, running four times as many ads in his support than it did for Mitt Romney in 2012.

He reminded his raucous supportive audience of how the national media tried to suppress voter turnout in 2016 by repeatedly stating that

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More Gun-control Hypocrisy Out of Chicago

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, April 24, 2017:

, former White House Chief of Staff

Rahm Emanuel

When the Chicago Police Department (CPD) reported back in September that 22-year-old Simone Mousheh had been arrested and charged with four felonies for violating gun laws, it noted that Simone is not alone in her crimes: “The Firearms Investigations Team say she is not an uncommon example of a female with a valid FOID [Firearm Owners Identification] who sells guns for profit.”

But, said the announcement, although she faces four felonies, she “will be eligible for a low bond based on her background. History has shown that these cases usually result in a plea of guilty in exchange for felony probation.”

That’s exactly what happened. On April 17

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An Inside Look at Venezuela’s Collapse

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, April 21, 2017: 

Português: Brasília - O chanceler da Venezuela...

Marxist Nicolas Maduro

Andres Malave grew up in Caracas until Chavez took over. Then he and his family were able to escape – barely – to the US. Wrote Malave, “It was a hard choice, but in hindsight, we were the lucky ones.”

Now he laments the blind eye many Americans turn towards the rioting, the deaths, the crime, the economic devastation, and the ravages of inflation that Venezuela is suffering:

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New York Times’ “Elitist” View Revealed Again

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, April 19, 2017:

South Carolina State House

South Carolina State House

In its opinion offered by the paper’s editorial board, the New York Times’ insertion last week into the debate going on in South Carolina over constitutional carry just might backfire. Citizens there might not like the Times’ efforts to characterize them as hillbillies, rednecks, and in the pocket of the National Rifle Association. The Times chose to quote a state representative who opposes the bill: “All it does is it makes these good ol’ boys who like to have guns strapped to their hips not conceal them.”

It had harsh descriptors for those favoring the right of South Carolinians to carry a sidearm – openly or concealed – calling those legislators favoring it “tone-deaf” and the bill itself “dangerous” and “laissez-faire.”

The bill passed the state House a week earlier, 64-46, and is headed for the state Senate for its consideration. The governor, Henry McMaster, is ready to sign it into law if it reaches his desk.

It may be that the Times knows that it is fighting a losing battle as momentum to regain full and proper rights guaranteed by the Second Amendment continues across the land. At the moment,

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Triggerman in Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry’s Death Finally Arrested

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, April 13, 2017:

English: Official portrait of United States At...

Eric Holder, the man behind the operation, who denied it all.

On the evening of December 14, 2010, U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry and other BORTAC (Border Patrol Tactical Unit) agents were patrolling Peck Canyon in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, about 11 miles north of the Mexico border. They ran into five members of a “rip crew” — low-level drug cartel operatives looking for drug smugglers to rob — and attempted to arrest them. When Terry and the others fired non-lethal beanbag rounds, the rip crew responded with automatic fire from AK-47 rifles. In the resulting firefight, Terry was killed. The suspected triggerman, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes, was arrested on Wednesday on a ranch on the border of the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Chihuahua.

His arrest was the result of a coordinated effort by the DEA, U.S. Marshalls, and BORTAC. This ends the search for the fifth and final member of that rip crew. The other four are serving long prison sentences for their part in the incident.

Terry’s death, it will be remembered,

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A Reminder of the Depth of Corruption in the Obama Administration

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, April 14, 2017: 

English: Cropped version of File:Official port...

English: Cropped version of File:Official portrait of Barack Obama.jpg. The image was cropped at a 3:4 portrait ratio, it was slightly sharpened and the contrast and colors were auto-adjusted in photoshop. This crop, in contrast to the original image, centers the image on Obama’s face and also removes the flag that takes away the focus from the portrait subject. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The so-called gun-walking scandal known as Operation Fast and Furious was a secretive, phony, and ultimately failed attempt to attack the Second Amendment. The official story was much different. Richard Serrano, writing in the Los Angeles Times in October 2011 bought the lie and then repeated it:

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Senators Rushing to White House With Names to Fill Judgeship Vacancies

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, April 10, 2017:  

Map of the geographic boundaries of the variou...

Map of the geographic boundaries of the various United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts.

In anticipation of Judge Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation by the Senate, Colorado Senator Cory Gardner began putting together a list of prospective nominees for President Trump to consider to take his seat on the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals: “We’re very close to sending over our list for the district,” said Gardner on Sunday.

Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) sees Trump’s opportunity to reshape the country’s legal system, calling on the president to enlist an “army of young, principled constitutionalists” to fill the openings:

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The New Attorney General Supports Local Police in Contrast to the Former AG, Who Worked to Assimilate Them

This article was published by the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, April 5, 2017:

English: A fully modern Police Box in Baltimor...

A fully modern Police Box in Baltimore, Maryland based on the British concept. The box is located on North Charles Street near Penn Station and contains a climate controlled workspace with an exterior emergency phone.

Revolutionary historians know all about the Hegelian Dialectic and its postulate that human beings can be driven to take a certain course of action by offering an argument (thesis), a counter-argument (antithesis), and a final resolution (synthesis). If one can control both sides of the conversation, the outcome is certain.

Take, for example, the death of Freddie Gary in 2015 in Baltimore. The details remain sketchy even today about exactly how he died in the back of the police van, but his death served the purpose of the communists.

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AG Sessions Requests Delay in Implementing Baltimore PD’s Consent Decree

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, April 4, 2017:

Baltimore Police Department

Eight days before the end of the Obama administration, Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced the final approval of an agreement allowing the Department of Justice to meddle in the affairs of the Baltimore Police Department. It only required approval from a judge for the agreement to become cemented into place.

Trump’s new attorney general, Jeff Sessions, asked the judge, U.S. District Judge James Bredar, to delay making his decision for 90 days so that the Justice Department, now operating under new guidelines from the president, could have time to “review and assess” it before its implementation.

The request came just hours after Sessions issued a memorandum to his department’s lawyers to “ensure” that any such consent decrees

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Los Angeles Mayor Is Defiant Against Trump’s Executive Order Regarding Illegals

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, March 22, 2017:

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (shown) has thrown down the gauntlet, defying President Donald Trump’s executive order issued in January, entitled “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States.” That executive order provides a three-step procedure to ensure that illegals are apprehended and deported: 1) the “name and shame” list of illegals committing crimes in so-called “sanctuary cities”; 2) threat of legal action against officials endorsing “sanctuary city” policies; and 3) threat of withholding federal funds if they persist in resisting federal immigration enforcement officials from performing their duties.

Even the title of Garcetti’s own executive directive is a poke in Trump’s eye: “Standing with Immigrants: A City of Safety, Refuge, and Opportunity for All,” even if those “All” are among Los Angeles’ estimated 2.6 million illegals.

Garcetti opens with a summary of West Coast liberalism:

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Sessions Promotes “Project Exile” Solution to Gun Violence

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, March 20, 2017: 

Seal of the United States Department of Justice

Seal of the United States Department of Justice

While President Trump’s Attorney General Jeff Sessions was in Richmond, Virginia, last week addressing federal, state, and local law-enforcement officials, he said he planned to promote a 20-year-old “solution” to gun violence: Project Exile: “We need to enforce our gun laws; we will put bad people behind bars,” he stated, adding that Project Exile is “a very discreet, effective policy” and that he will “promote it nationwide.”

If Project Exile worked so well 20 years ago in Richmond, why did the city back away from it in 2006? And why haven’t scores of other cities adopted it since then and praised its performance? Additionally, why have the NRA and the Brady Campaign endorsed it while groups such as Gun Owners of America (GOA) and Jews for the Preservation of Firearms Ownership (JPFO) have come out against it?

When it was initially implemented in 1997 in Richmond, the city had seen its murder rate skyrocket. In 1996, there were 112 murders, which put it in the top five cities in the country for its murder rate per thousand population. The next year Richmond experienced 140 murders.

The guiding principle of the project was to

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.