Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Tag Archives: Black Friday

Mississippi’s Second Amendment Sales Tax Free Weekend: “Bigger than Black Friday”

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, August 25, 2017:

According to Todd Sarotte, the manager of Van’s Sporting Goods in Brandon, Mississippi, this weekend’s Second Amendment celebration — firearms and related accessories are exempt from the state’s 7 percent sales tax through midnight Sunday —  is the biggest of the year for him: “It’s actually bigger for us than Black Friday. It’s grown every year, and for the last two years it’s been bigger than Black Friday for us.”

The exemption saves a buyer of a Glock semi-automatic pistol nearly $40 while a purchaser of a Stag Arms Model 3 Typhoon AR-15 saves more than

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Trump “Slump” in Gun Sales Is Only Temporary

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, March 15, 2017:  

With a decline in the number background checks being performed, the fall in the stock prices of gun makers, the cutting back of workers in the gun industry, and the bankruptcy of a major sporting goods chain, some in the media are suggesting that the boom in the firearms sector is over.

On the surface the evidence is persuasive.

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The Global Recession Claims its First Victim: Hanjin Shipping

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, September 9, 2016:  

English: Hanjin container ship

One of Hanjin’s container ships looking for a place to unload.

When the question about a tree falling in the forest is asked, it’s usually posed as a philosophical one: “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” The question is never asked: “What if someone is around who doesn’t want to hear it?”

That appears to explain the kept media’s deafness over the state of the global economy. Even when the Wall Street Journal reported on the bankruptcy of Hanjin Shipping, the world’s seventh largest container shipping company, not one word was spent on asking why. Instead

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Hanjin Bankruptcy: a Harbinger for the Global Economy?

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, September 8, 2016:  

English: A Delmas operated Container ship NICO...

South Korea’s Hanjin Shipping was the world’s seventh-largest container shipping company, moving (until last week) 100 million tons of cargo on its 200 cargo ships from manufacturers to retailers across the globe. Last week, following years of losses as the global economy has slowed, Hanjin declared bankruptcy. That move stranded 90 of those ships as off-loading companies refused to unload them over concerns that they wouldn’t be paid.

Even an offer of $90 million from what’s left of Hanjin (including $36 million from the personal assets of its chairman) fell far short of the necessary $543 million estimated to unload all of its ships that are now circling ports around the world.

Concerns are mounting that

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Gun Permit Applications Swamping Local, Federal Agencies

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, January 20, 2016:  

In the month following the San Bernardino shooting, applications for concealed weapons permits in San Bernardino County and neighboring Riverside County jumped from the usual 80 requests per month to more than 750, swamping officials in both counties. In San Bernardino, applications are being delayed up to 18 months, while in Riverside application appointments are being scheduled out to September.

John Lott, founder of the Crime Prevention Research Center, expressed the frustration of many:

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New York Times: More Kinds of Guns and Ammo “Must be Outlawed”

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Sunday, December 6, 2015:  

In its Saturday edition, the New York Times published a front-page editorial for the first time since 1920. The last time the Times gave one of its editorials this kind of prominence was when the editors criticized the Republican Party for nominating Warren Harding for president. Harding won anyway.

This time, according to Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., the publisher of the Times and the chairman of the New York Times Company (which owns the paper), it was necessary “to deliver

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Black Friday Gun Sales Outstripping Government’s Ability to Keep up

This article first appeared at the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, December 1, 2014: 

Leaving a meeting with Vice-President Joe Biden, NRA official Jim Baker told The Daily Caller that Biden said the government simply couldn’t keep up with tracking, following, and monitoring Americans buying guns:

Regarding the lack of prosecutions for lying on the [gun registration] Form 4473s, we simply don’t have the time or [the] manpower to prosecute everybody who lies on a form, who checks a wrong box, [or] who answers a question inaccurately.

That was before Black Friday virtually inundated the FBI’s National Instant Background Check System (NCIS). According to the FBI, on Friday background checks were running at

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Gun Sales Triple on Black Friday

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Sunday, November 30, 2104:

The national media were full of reports from retailers of Black Friday consumers driving sales to record levels, with some retailers estimating sales jumping 15 to almost 40 percent over last year. Consumers not only took advantage of specials being offered the day after Thanksgiving, but in many cases even shopped on Thanksgiving Day, perhaps foregoing a little turkey and football in the process.

It’s called Black Friday for a very good reason:

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Union Protests at Walmart Fizzle as Expected

Walmart on Black Friday 2009

(Photo credit: laurieofindy)

Remember the threat from the United Food & Commercial Workers union? “We’re going to shut them down. We’re going to paralyze them. We will be heard!” or words to that effect. All hat and no cattle:

The protests failed to reduce traffic at the world’s largest retailer. Wal-Mart said today that it had larger crowds than last year and drew about 22 million customers yesterday. The retailer said in a statement that it has sold more than 1.3 million televisions, 1.3 million dolls and 250,000 bicycles since its promotions began at 8 p.m. yesterday.

Not a bad day at the office, eh? And how about those protests? How did they turn out?

Wal-Mart said only 26 protests took place at stores last night and fewer than 50 associates participated.

Where were those protesters? Where were those disgruntled and unhappy workers and other supporters that the union was going to recruit to man the barricades? They were

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The Story Behind Black Friday

Black Friday shoppers at Walmart

Black Friday shoppers at Walmart (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As usual, there’s more to the story than meets the eye. Retailers discovered the benefits of promoting Christmas shopping earlier and earlier, pushing Franklin D. to move Thanksgiving Day back a week:

Before 1930s: Unwritten Rules

In the early 1900s it was an unwritten rule that no retail store would promote Christmas items until after Thanksgiving. (Wow, can you imagine?) Instead of holiday sales in October, companies would spend lots of money on parades the day after Thanksgiving.

You can still see evidences of these parades today in the Macy’s Day Parade and others. Retail stores would sponsor giant parades the day after Thanksgiving and you could bet that one of the final floats in the parade would include Santa Claus, reminding all people to buy their Christmas gifts from the sponsoring store.

But then an interesting concept began to emerge: today we call it “crony capitalism.” It’s the conjunction of interests of some/many in the private sector seeing the advantages of

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A Union to Strike Walmart on Black Friday? Please!

PEOPLE'S RALLY  FOR  WALMART-FREE NEW YORK CIT...

(Photo credit: asterix611)

The United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) union is going to picket 1,000 Wal-Mart stores this coming Friday, hoping to dissuade Walmart shoppers to go elsewhere and put pressure on Walmart to accede to its demands to unionize its workers. It’s been tried before and failed. It will fail again.

For years, the United Food & Commercial Workers union has tried and failed to organize Walmart workers. In recent months, the union has adopted a new tactic: backing two groups, OUR Walmart and Making Change at Walmart, and waging a media campaign and mounting protests comprised of activists and Walmart workers at stores and warehouses around the U.S.

It won’t work, for two reasons: the union has to recruit lots of people to stand in the picket lines. And those picket lines will have to

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First, Borders; Then, Kodak; Now, Barnes & Noble?

Barnes and noble

When Barnes & Noble announced its awful earnings per share losses on Thursday, it didn’t help any that its losses were so much worse than the company had projected just a month earlier. In October, Barnes & Noble estimated losses for its fiscal year at between 30 and 70 cents per share.

Its latest numbers, revised downward to between $1.10 and $1.40, shook investors who pushed shares to $11, down from $17 in early November. The one critical number which investors look at primarily, called EBITDA—earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization—fell from $281 million last year to $163 million this year, a decline of more than 40 percent.

It’s easy to say that technological change and market preferences are pushing Barnes & Noble to the edge of bankruptcy, but its position is vastly different from that of its former competitor, Borders, which disappeared in September. What’s more accurate is to say that Barnes & Noble saw the change coming but waited before responding to it. Succeeding brilliantly in the 1990s by providing a vast array of discounted books, games, and accessories, it innovated by opening Starbucks cafes in its stores and providing its customers with comfortable chairs and couches in informal reading areas. In 1998, it anticipated the change from print to digital and purchased NuvoMedia, the maker of the Rocket eBook reader. But in 2003 it exited the digital business, concluding that there was no profit in it.

Barnes & Noble realized its mistake, and in 2009, introduced its Nook e-reader. But it had allowed Amazon to gain a two-year advantage with its own Kindle e-reader, and then Amazon increased its advantage over Barnes & Noble by

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Whirlpool Asks for Mercantilism, Forces Consumers to Pay More

Whirlpool Corporation

One of the ways that Whirlpool Corporation celebrated its 100th anniversary last year was to file petitions against two of its main South Korean competitors for “dumping” washing machines onto the market on Black Friday. Whirlpool claimed that Samsung was selling their 3.7 cubic-foot top-loading washing machines at a wholesale price of $363.18, way below the $751.46 Whirlpool says it would cost them to make the same product. Consequently, Samsung and LG Electronics sold thousands of their washers over the Black Friday weekend, taking substantial market share away from Whirlpool.

In its complaint, Whirlpool demanded an investigation into their rivals’ practice of “dumping” washers at prices that Whirlpool couldn’t match, and then demanded sanctions—tariffs—against the offending competitors and their products.

It’s worked before. Last March Whirlpool filed a similar petition about their competitors dumping high-end refrigerators and the Commerce Department agreed, applying a 37-percent duty on

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Black Friday Redux: Cornell Professor Wants to Tax Black Friday Away

Black Friday shoppers at Walmart

On the lookout for perceived injustices in the marketplace, Cornell University professor Robert Frank decided that Black Friday needed his attention and wrote in the New York Times about just what was needed: more taxes to discourage unreasonable behavior.

His first complaint was about the unreasonable hours that stores were opening in an effort to respond to consumer demand: “For many years, stores opened at reasonable hours. Then, some started opening at 5 a.m., prompting complaints from employees about having to go to sleep early on Thanksgiving and miss out on time with their families. But retailers ignored those complaints, because their earlier start time proved so successful in luring customers away from rival outlets.”

He then iterated the now-familiar theme of major retailers opening earlier and earlier, also in response to consumer demand. He said it was thoughtless of those greedy merchants to

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.