Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Category Archives: History

Auto Loan Bubble a Replay of Housing Mortgage Bubble?

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, January 12, 2015:

When Patrina Thomas decided it was time to trade in her 2002 Jeep in the summer of 2013, she went back to her local friendly Chrysler dealer. They were only too happy to take her Jeep as a down payment on a used 2008 Chrysler Sebring with the balance, an estimated $10,000, financed at 20.4 percent interest. Because her credit score was below 620, she qualified for “special” financing provided by Santander Consumer USA Holdings, a lender working closely with Chrysler Capital in such cases.

Her payment was so high — $385 a month — that she struggled to make it from the very first month. It finally got beyond her ability to pay, and the car was repossessed a year later. With a market value today of just $4,600 and her remaining loan balance of $7,600, she is upside down by $3,000.

Thomas has lots of company. According to the Wall Street Journal

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New Illinois Governor Facing Torrent of Red Ink

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, January 12, 2015:

 

Previous Illinois administrations and politicians have been kicking the can down the road for decades. Now, the state has run out of road. Bruce Rauner, Illinois’ new Republican governor, was inaugurated on Monday and is facing a daunting task: a $4 billion backlog of unpaid bills and a budget showing deficits approaching $21 billion in three years unless something is done.

During his campaign that successfully ousted what Huffington Post noted as the “nation’s least popular governor,” Pat Quinn, Rauner made the usual political promises of streamlining government and improving education and the state’s business climate, all without increasing taxes. In fact, he promised

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Yes, Karen, There’s an Auto Loan Bubble After All

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, January 12, 2015:

2007 Chrysler Sebring photographed in USA.

Chrysler Sebring

There’s little doubt that Karen Weise enjoyed her weekend. Back in August she tried to raise concerns about the bubble in auto financing, but couldn’t pin them down. A reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek in Seattle, all she could find back then were Fed spokesmen pooh-poohing concerns that too many broke people were getting car loans, that such fears were “misplaced,” that “it’s unlikely the composition of auto loan originations in our data will radically change since last year,” as New York Fed spokesman Matthew Ward put it.

She quoted four economists from the New York Fed who were unanimous:

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Boehner Retaliates, Strips Opponents of Committee Responsibilities

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, January 7, 2015: 

 

In the days running up to the opening of the 114th Congress, speculation was rampant that House Speaker John Boehner’s bid for a third term as speaker was in jeopardy. So much so that Boehner launched a full-court press including meetings with those opposed to his reelection and phone calls to dissidents right up to the last minute before the vote. 

In the end, a combination of bad weather, a funeral, and a popular Florida Republican’s reluctance to oppose the speaker until the day before the vote spelled victory for Boehner. 

Under House rules, only a majority of those present — not a majority of the total House membership — is needed to elect the speaker. With many Democrats attending the funeral service of former New York Governor Mario Cuomo, and bad weather delaying flights into Washington, those present numbered just 401 out of House membership of 434 (New York Republican Rep. Michael Grimm resigned last week after pleading guilty to felony tax evasion). In the end, Boehner secured his position for another two years with 216 votes. 

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Human Progress Is Accelerating, Says Cato

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, December 31, 2014: 

Cato Institute

The Cato Institute continues to update its Human Progress website with sources from around the world showing graphically the enormous progress human beings have made in every conceivable area of their lives, especially over the last 50 years. 

From communications to the environment, from housing to transportation, there’s a data set that shows how far the human race has come in a very short period of time. 

Cato’s primary purpose in continuing to develop its HumanProgress.org website, already remarkably robust, is to dispel the common myth that things are getting worse, and at an accelerating rate: 

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John Lott Is No Longer Alone: More Guns Do Mean Less Crime

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, December 31, 2014:

English: Current Status of Shall Issue Laws in...

Recent Status of Shall Issue Laws in America

With degrees from the University of Chicago, Yale, the Wharton School and UCLA in economics, it was clear from the beginning that John Lott wanted to become an academic, burying himself in esoteric econometric modeling for a narrow audience.

It was not to be. Lott became interested in how anti-gunners were using statistical analysis to prove that more guns would mean more crime, which analysis was then used to buttress political agendas to emasculate the Second Amendment.

He decided, in 1998, to write a small book entitled More Guns, Less Crime, to refute that analysis and present his own. As far as gun ownership was concerned, Lott was an agnostic.

When it was published in June, 1998, his book ignited such a firestorm of protest and indignation among the anti-gunners that he was forced to

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Wall Street’s Hallelujah Chorus Greets New Highs in Stocks

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, December 26, 2014:

 

 

Observers of new highs being put in by stocks at the Wall Street Journal could hardly restrain themselves. Eric Morath and Ben Leubsdorf, writing in the Journal on Tuesday, noted that the economy is now enjoying “a sweet spot of robust growth, sustained hiring, and falling unemployment [which is] stirring optimism that a post-recession breakout has arrived.”

Translation: Good times are here again, and likely to continue. Break out the Brie and Chablis.

Looking past the celebrations and the prognostications seemed, at first view, to confirm the market’s outlook:

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Whistleblowers Get Paid, Countrywide Chairman Gets Off

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, December 22, 2014: 

Last August, Bank of America agreed to pay out nearly $17 billion to settle sixteen lawsuits over making and marketing fraudulent mortgages leading up to the start of the Great Recession, setting a record in the process. But the details, under the False Claims Act, remained sealed until last week. The big news, according to the Wall Street Journal, was just how much four whistleblowers were getting: $170 million plus.

Even after the IRS and lawyers get their share, those four will enjoy a more comfortable lifestyle for a long time. Three individuals and a small New Jersey mortgage company, Mortgage Now, will share the spoils. Mortgage Now will receive

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New York Times Declares Victory in Release of Alan Gross

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, December 17, 2014: 

In its 2,000-word summary of the machinations involved in the 18-month-long effort to obtain the release of American citizen Alan Gross (pictured above with his wife) from his filthy Cuban jail cell, the New York Times once again revealed not only its partisan efforts to legitimize the Castro regime but also its intimate familiarity with and support of all the pieces and parts and participants involved in the release of Gross.

The New York Times, of course, has a pro-communist legacy dating back to before the days of Castro’s takeover of that unhappy island in 1959. At that time, the Times’ chief communist apologist,

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The Second Amendment continues to Thrive, says Pew Research

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, December 15, 2014:

Life has lately been hard for the anti-gunners and those opposed to the Second Amendment. According to Pew Research, it isn’t likely to get easier any time soon. For 20 years, Pew has been asking Americans a simple question:

What do you think is more important – to protect the right of Americans to own guns, OR to control gun ownership?

In 1993, the Second Amendment guaranteeing American citizens the right to keep and bear arms had few friends. According to Pew, just 34 percent of those polled thought it was more important than passing more gun control laws, while 57 percent favored more gun control legislation.

Its popularity hit bottom in March, 2000, about a year after the Columbine High School massacre in a Denver suburb, with just 29 percent supporting it compared to 66 percent wanting more controls.

Since then, however, Pew has been measuring a resurgence of support for the beleaguered guarantee,

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Dollree Mapp, Defendant in Landmark Fourth Amendment Case, Dead at 91

This article first appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, December 10, 2014: 

3,927 days Earl Warren from 1943 to 1953

Chief Justice Earl Warren

When Dollree Mapp answered the door on May 23, 1957, she had no idea of the impact her next move would have on jurisprudence in the United States. 

At her door were three local police officers who were searching for a suspect in a bombing, and they asked permission to enter her home, having been given information that he might be hiding there. She asked them if they had a search warrant. When they said no, she refused entry. 

Two officers left, leaving one behind to maintain surveillance. Three hours later the two officers returned, along with several others who demanded entry into her home. At that point, according to Supreme Court Justice Tom Clark, writing for the majority in Mapp v. Ohio, 

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Swiss Issue an Unequivocal Buy Signal for Gold

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, December 5, 2014:

Rarely do the precious markets receive such an unequivocal, unblemished, unalloyed buy signal as the one issued by the Swiss when they voted down, 3-to-1, a referendum that would have modestly restricted the activities of its central bank.

Months earlier, polls showed that the “Save Our Swiss Gold” initiative was likely to pass, but massive publicity campaigns and moves by Citigroup to cash in on it caused a huge shift in public sentiment, with the final vote on Sunday, November 30 defeating it by a 78-22% margin.

The Swiss, being a direct democracy, are known for referendums, voting on an average of five of them every year, with most of them failing. But this one caused rejoicing among observers and Swiss National Bank (SNB) officials that likely put in a bottom in the gold market. Had it passed, the referendum would have required the SNB to

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The Great Thanksgiving Hoax

This article was written by Richard J. Maybury and appeared a the Mises Institute’s website, Mises Daily this morning, November 27, 2014:

"The Embarkation of the Pilgrims from Del...

“The Embarkation of the Pilgrims from Delfthaven in Holland” (1844) by Robert Walter Weir (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Each year at this time, schoolchildren all over America are taught the official Thanksgiving story, and newspapers, radio, TV, and magazines devote vast amounts of time and space to it. It is all very colorful and fascinating.

It is also very deceiving. This official story is nothing like what really happened. It is a fairy tale, a whitewashed and sanitized collection of half-truths which divert attention away from Thanksgiving’s real meaning.

The official story has the Pilgrims boarding the Mayflower, coming to America, and establishing the Plymouth colony in the winter of 1620–21. This first winter is hard, and half the colonists die. But the survivors are hard-working and tenacious, and they learn new farming techniques from the Indians. The harvest of 1621 is bountiful. The pilgrims hold a celebration, and give thanks to God. They are grateful for the wonderful new abundant land He has given them.

The official story then has the Pilgrims living more or less happily ever after, each year repeating the first Thanksgiving. Other early colonies also have hard times at first, but they soon prosper and adopt the annual tradition of giving thanks for this prosperous new land called America.

The problem with this official story is that the harvest of 1621 was not bountiful, nor were the colonists hard-working or tenacious. 1621 was a famine year and many of the colonists were lazy thieves.

In his History of Plymouth Plantation, the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years because they refused to work in the field. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” The crops were small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.” 

In the harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, “all had their hungry bellies filled,” but only briefly. The prevailing condition during those years was not the abundance the official story claims, it was famine and death. The first “Thanksgiving” was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.

But in subsequent years something changes. The harvest of 1623 was different. Suddenly, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty,” Bradford wrote, “and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many, for which they blessed God.” Thereafter, he wrote, “any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day.” In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn.

What happened? After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, “they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop.” They began to question their form of economic organization.

This had required that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, traffic, trucking, working, fishing, or any other means” were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” A person was to put into the common stock all he could, and take only what he needed.

This “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving. Bradford writes that “young men that were most able and fit for labor and service” complained about being forced to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.” Also, “the strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes, than he that was weak.” So the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.

To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism. He gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of the famines. 

Many early groups of colonists set up socialist states, all with the same terrible results. At Jamestown, established in 1607, out of every shipload of settlers that arrived, less than half would survive their first twelve months in America. Most of the work was being done by only one-fifth of the men, the other four-fifths choosing to be parasites. In the winter of 1609–10, called “The Starving Time,” the population fell from five-hundred to sixty. Then the Jamestown colony was converted to a free market, and the results were every bit as dramatic as those at Plymouth. In 1614 Colony Secretary Ralph Hamor wrote that after the switch there was “plenty of food, which every man by his own industry may easily and doth procure.” He said that when the socialist system had prevailed, “we reaped not so much corn from the labors of thirty men as three men have done for themselves now.”

Before these free markets were established, the colonists had nothing for which to be thankful. They were in the same situation as Ethiopians are today, and for the same reasons. But after free markets were established, the resulting abundance was so dramatic that annual Thanksgiving celebrations became common throughout the colonies, and in 1863 Thanksgiving became a national holiday.

Thus, the real meaning of Thanksgiving, deleted from the official story, is: Socialism does not work; the one and only source of abundance is free markets, and we thank God we live in a country where we can have them.

Pressure Building to Repeal Two Laws Keeping Oil and Gas Prices High

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, November 17, 2014:

Senator Lisa Murkowski

Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski

Alaskan Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski, soon to chair the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, is already setting the table for a serious conversation about getting rid of at least one archaic law dating back to the mid-1970s: the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975.

That law bans the export of crude oil (with some minor exceptions) and could endanger the oil shale boom as a result. Said Murkowski:

The price American drivers pay for gasoline at their local station is linked to the price of oil set by the global market.

 

Exporting U.S. oil to our friends and allies will not raise gasoline prices here at home and should, in fact, help drive down prices.

As the price of crude oil drops, it increases the chances that smaller marginal crude oil producers will be forced to close unless they are allowed to find buyers outside the United States willing to pay more for their product. One of the bottlenecks has already been opened:

Keep reading…

The President is Rapidly Becoming Irrelevant

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, November 17, 2014:

Matthew Dowd, George W. Bush’s campaign strategist, saw it coming almost a month before the midterms, telling ABC News on September 15th that the president is “fast becoming irrelevant in Washington” and noting further that Obama was at precisely the same point George Bush was in 2005:

That point in time it was basically the beginning of the end of President Bush’s presidency.

 

I think the president [Obama] is a very big fan of history. He watched that go on with [Bush]. Unless the president changes his trajectory, he is on the road to irrelevancy.

He hasn’t, and he is. The Baltimore Sun used the “R” word (relevance) in its review of the demolition of the Democrats on November 4th:

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Obama Way Over His Head at the APEC Summit

This article first appeared at The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, November 14, 2014:

Xi Jinping 习近平

Xi Jinping. China’s “Paramount Leader”

Nowhere was President Obama’s shrinking influence in world affairs more apparent than when he opened the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing earlier this week by announcing an “agreement” with China’s “paramount leader,” Xi Jinping, to extend visas in both countries from one year to ten. The enhancements will have little real world impact but they served to give Obama the appearance of being a player.

A U.S. visa only serves as preliminary permission to seek admission to the United States. Final admission remains, as it always has, in the hands of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer who, after questioning and investigation of the nonimmigrant’s purposes, will then issue a Form I-94. That form serves as the official government document authorizing the alien’s stay in the country.

Nevertheless, Obama made the most of it:

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Do Overseas Military Base Closures Mean a Shrinking U.S. Empire?

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 12, 2014:

When the Department of Defense issued its annual Real Property Inventory, Dmitry Orlov, an investigative reporter and author of The Five Stages of Collapse, was curious to see how the American empire was doing. To his astonishment, looking back as far as 1957, Orlov discovered that it is shrinking, declining sharply last year and continuing a trend of shrinkage going back for more than a decade:

The US may still have control of its domestic and territorial bases, but it has suffered huge losses of foreign military bases and acreage. Since reaching “peak foreign military bases” in 2004, the US now has just 64% of them — a loss of over a third in a decade! In the case of acreage the US retains 69% of its peak acreage in 2006, so it has lost 31% of its foreign military acreage — also close to a third. If you want to guess at what’s behind these numbers, you might want to look at them as the fallout from disastrous US foreign policy,

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The Dangers Lurking in the Upcoming Lame Duck Congress

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, October 6, 2014:

In anticipation of the Republican sweep in the elections on Tuesday, Senators Mike Lee (R-Utah) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) wrote to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) in September warning him not to offer any significant legislation during the lame duck session following the elections. Knowing Reid, they presumed the worst from him:

Presumably, a lame duck session would be used [by you] to try to pass partisan, unpopular bills in November or December that might be indefensible before the … election….

 

Deliberately planning to reconvene the Senate in a lame-duck session to address major new legislation would subvert the will of the American people, lessen accountability and do lasting damage to the dignity and integrity of this body’s proceedings.

Libertarian economist Donald Boudreaux no doubt thinks Lee and Cruz have understated the danger:

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Fracking Boom and the Development of America’s Energy Resources

This article will appear as the cover story in the next issue of The New American print magazine:

Travis Wright’s first impressions of Williston, North Dakota, in January 2012 remain vivid. It was bitter cold and the Walmart parking lot was filled to overflowing with campers and RVs whose owners were using them as de facto homes while working in the oil fields. Once inside Walmart, Travis discovered pallets of goods blocking the aisles as the understaffed nighttime crew of stockers simply couldn’t keep up with demand. He quickly learned to do his shopping in the middle of the night when the lines were only 30 minutes long. He learned later that this Walmart in Williston was the highest-grossing one in North America. The local economy was booming to such an extent that even paying $17 an hour for entry-level jobs, store officials couldn’t find enough employees to work for that amount.

Travis — at 6′6″ and 280 pounds, his friends called him Big ‘Un — was also astonished to learn

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Ferguson Case Leak: Wilson Will Not Be Indicted in Brown Shooting

This article first appeared at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, October 29, 2014:

On Monday the hacker group Anonymous released the latest in a series of leaks about the grand jury ruling that have had residents in Ferguson, Missouri, on edge since August:

On or about November 10, 2014 the Grand Jury decision will be announced: [police officer] Darren Wilson will NOT be indicted on ANY charges related to the [shooting] of Mike Brown.

 

All local police chiefs and jail commanders have been notified to begin preparing for major civil unrest. [Missouri] Governor Nixon has been notified of the impending [grand jury] announcement and has ordered the Missouri National Guard to begin preparations for a possible reinstatement of the martial law that was declared at the beginning of the Ferguson protests.

The only other information from Anonymous was that they checked their sources and confirmed that the leaks were accurate:

In our opinion, after careful analysis, the sources are reliable, and the information we are [revealing] is true.

 

Both sources are government employees with access to both internal government as well as confidential police communications. For reasons of safety we will not be revealing anything further on either our sources or the material leaked to us.

This comes on top of leaks from the New York Times, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and the Huffington Post which, taken together, support the contention that Wilson was defending himself and shot Brown to keep from being severely injured or killed by Brown.

One leak revealed an autopsy report showing that Brown had a close-range bullet wound to his thumb, with blood splatters from Brown on the police cruiser’s front door panel and on Wilson’s uniform. For Judy Melinek, a forensic pathologist who reviewed the autopsy report for the Post-Dispatch, the evidence supports Wilson:

[The report] supports the fact that this guy [Brown] is reaching for the gun, if he has gunpowder particulate material in the wound … if he has his hand near the gun when it goes off, he’s going for the officer’s gun.

Melinek also concluded that Brown was facing Wilson when the other shots were fired, not running away as claimed initially by onlookers. The Times reported that this is in line with Wilson’s claim that Brown had pinned him to the front seat of his cruiser and Wilson was fighting to keep his sidearm away from Brown when it discharged. The Times noted further that the forensic evidence “speaks to Officer Wilson’s state of mind, his feeling of vulnerability and his sense of heightened alert when he killed Mr. Brown.”

That Ferguson is a tinderbox just waiting for the spark from the grand jury to ignite it was evidenced last Wednesday night when more than 200 protesters gathered outside the Ferguson Police Department building to celebrate the 19th annual National Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality. The radical revolutionary organizing group October 22 Coalition explained its purposes for the protest using language that reflects its intention to enrage, inflame, and invite police retaliation:

In Ferguson, Missouri, people continue to rise up in outrage against the killing of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old Black youth who was just days away from starting college. Despite the rapid and ruthless militarization of the town by racist police and the National Guard, people defied curfews, tear gas, rubber bullets, and calls for a return to business-as-usual — and oppression-as-usual — by protesting and rebelling for ten consecutive, sweltering nights in August.

 

These are the moments where the decades of racist abuse, criminalization and police terror at the hands of this system came crashing against fearless resistance from the very people it seeks to control….

 

This year … in the face of police brutality, repression, mass incarceration and the criminalization of youth we say, Let the spirit of Ferguson ignite hearts nationwide with an uncompromising passion for justice!

This was no peaceful law-abiding protest. Barricades that had been set up to block access to the Ferguson Police Department’s parking lot were tossed aside and when officers tried to clear the lot, they were attacked with rocks, bottles and, in one case, a steel rod. One of the instigators, “Mike Wazowski,” affiliated with the pro-communist National Lawyers Guild, was among those arrested, providing evidence (if any more be needed) that this was no gathering of innocents.

A number of those protesting were only too happy to render their opinions about the leaks of the grand jury decision. Said Ben Teter, an out-of-towner from O’Fallon, Missouri: “It’s not a surprise that they’ve leaked the information. To me, it seems like they released things on purpose … to downplay Mike Brown and make him seem like a bad guy.” Another outsider from Marshall, Missouri, Bryan Buck, saw a more devious purpose behind the leaks: “I think the information was released to strategically support [police officer] Darren Wilson.”

Former St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch told the St. Louis Business Journal last week that more leaks can be expected as part of a coordinated plan to prepare Ferguson citizens for the inevitable ruling of innocence by the grand jury: “[It’s a way] to start getting some of the facts out there to kind of let people down slowly.”

The Ferguson Police Department is gearing up for the consequences. The Huffington Post reported that the department has already spent more than $200,000 for 650 tear-gas grenades, smoke-and-gas grenades, smoke canisters, 1,500 “sock rounds” (beanbags) and 6,000 pepper ball rounds which sting the eyes and nose when fired at a protester. The department also purchased 235 new helmets, 25 new batons, and 60 pairs of shin guards, along with 2,000 plastic “flex” handcuffs. And it has earmarked $50,000 to repair damaged police cruisers, but those repairs won’t be completed “until the unrest is over,” according to police records summarizing the expenditures.

While the police are preparing, so are the protesters. Said Rene Jones, who lives close to where the Brown shooting took place:

I think there’ll be a bunch of trouble if something right don’t happen. There’s nothing that’s going to convince people around here that it’s not the system protecting its own if Wilson walks free.

As far as Jones is concerned, the grand jury has already announced its verdict:

The justice system isn’t doing its part. They need to indict Darren Wilson. That’s what’s got everyone enraged. They are ducking and diving. We want justice. Even though he’s a cop he should be treated the same as everybody else.

Jones’ next door neighbor, who called himself Big Woody, was blunt: “It’s going to get real ugly if they don’t indict him.”

The script in Ferguson is playing out just as planned: Protesters invite retaliation, which escalates into confrontation, which moves the needle toward federal intervention, resulting ultimately in the creation of a national police force.

Local police under the control of local citizens is the best defense against police abuses, which is why revolutionaries for decades have attacked local police, trying to turn them into an arm of the federal government.

Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.