Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Category Archives: History

R.C. Sproul Goes to His Eternal Reward

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, December 18, 2017:  

English: Logo of Ligonier Ministries

Logo of Ligonier Ministries

Robert Charles “R.C.” Sproul left his earthly existence around 3:00 p.m. Thursday afternoon in a hospital in Altamonte Springs, Florida, surrounded by his wife, Vespa, and members of his family.

When he suffered a stroke in 2015, someone asked him what he wanted to see engraved on his tombstone. His cheerful response: “I told you I was sick!”

He never fully recovered from that stroke, and in early December a combination of the flu and COPD (from which he suffered for years) sent him back to the hospital. Despite the medical efforts to restore his breathing, he passed into eternity after 12 days in the hospital, at the age of 78.

Sproul came to faith in Christ in an experience that he said was probably unique in all of human history. As a football player at Westminster College, he was having dinner with the captain of the team:

Keep reading…

U.S. Economy’s Stunning Performance Continues to Bewilder Forecasters

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, December 14, 2017:

US Retail Sales 1992–2010

US Retail Sales 1992–2010. Threy’ve been on a tear ever since.

Economic forecasters continue to fall behind reality, as shown by the latest numbers from the Commerce Department. Forecasters predicted that November’s retail sales would increase just 0.3 percent over October. Instead, retail sales jumped an astonishing 0.8 percent. In an economy where two-thirds of economic activity is geared toward providing consumers with goods and services, that’s huge miss — on the order of a three-quarters of a billion dollar miss.

October’s numbers dumbfounded them as well:

Keep reading…

November’s Federal Deficit 11 Percent Ahead of Last Year’s

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, December 13, 2017:

Buried in the latest report from the Department of the Treasury is this nugget: Through the first two months of the fiscal year, which began on October 1, the deficit (the difference between revenues and spending) was 11 percent higher than the same two months last year. And this despite revenues (taxes from individuals and corporations) setting records. The $433 billion the government collected in October and November was $13 billion more than it collected in the same period last year, and $11.3 billion more than it collected the year before.

In those two months,

Keep reading…

November’s Jobs Report Beats Forecasters, Again

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, December 8, 2017:

Once again economists’ forecasts fell short in November, with the surging economy generating 228,000 new jobs compared to estimates of fewer than 200,000. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the unemployment rate stayed at 4.1 percent, with most of the growth taking place in construction, manufacturing, professional and business services, and education and health services. These are regarded in general as high-paying jobs, as compared to “leisure and hospitality” positions, whose numbers increased only modestly last month.

Wage growth stayed ahead of inflation, but

Keep reading…

Trump Lights Up Christmas Tree, Explains Real Reason for the Season

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, December 4, 2017: 

During the White House Christmas tree lighting ceremony last Thursday evening, President Donald Trump was more clear and more forthright about the reason for the season than Americans have heard from the White House in years:

Keep reading…

Where Have All the Fiscal Conservatives Gone?

U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee

U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, December 4, 2017:  

The only Republican Senator to vote against the tax reform bill that was passed in the wee hours of Saturday morning was Bob Corker of Tennessee. Said Corker, “At the end of the day I am not able to cast aside my fiscal concerns and vote for legislation which I believe, based on the information I currently have, could deepen the debt burden on future generations.”

The other so-called fiscal conservative Republicans have apparently not done their homework or were voting for hope over experience. When asked how President Reagan managed to get his tax cut bill through Congress, Bob Brennis, a George Mason University grad, summed it up:

Keep reading…

Trump Roils the Left by Referring to Elizabeth Warren as “Pocahontas”

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, November 28, 2017:

While honoring Native Americans who were “code-talkers” during World War II, President Donald Trump on Monday once again succumbed to the temptation to use the moment to call out Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren by her “nickname” Pocahontas: “You were here long before any of us were, although we have a representative in Congress who they say was here a long time ago. They call her Pocahontas.”

The silence was deafening, but not the outrage expressed during a press conference that took place shortly afterward.

Keep reading…

Total Black Friday Sales Set Records; Cyber Monday Also Likely a Record

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, November 27, 2017:

Preliminary numbers show that online sales on Thanksgiving and Black Friday surged to record highs, with Cyber Monday sales likely to do the same. Adobe Analytics said that the push to buy online will make Monday’s Internet sales — estimated at $6.6 billion — the largest online shopping day in history. In 2014, Cyber Monday sales set a record at $2.65 billion, followed by another record in 2015 at $2.98 billion. If the present pace continues, online shopping will have more than doubled in just two years.

Total sales (online plus brick and mortar) from Wednesday evening through Monday night are expected to touch

Keep reading…

Holiday Shopping Season Starting Off with a Bang; How Long Can Present Exuberance Last?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, November 27, 2017:

The numbers the economy is generating are breathtaking. All that the Thanksgiving/Black Friday numbers are doing is confirming everything else: it’s full speed ahead. Total sales from Wednesday evening through Monday night are likely to come in at a record $33 billion, with half coming from online orders. Total purchases for the entire holiday season are headed for $700 billion, up at least four percent from last year. Cyber Monday is likely to touch $7 billion all by itself, more than twice what it was just two years ago.

Black Friday is the third-busiest shopping day of the year, right behind

Keep reading…

NFL Players’ Protests Focusing Attention on League’s Tax Breaks

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, November 24, 2017:

The knee-bending antics of professional football players are focusing attention on a key issue: Are the taxpayer subsidies involved in supporting the NFL worth it in generating new revenues as promised? An issue getting less attention is whether taxpayers should be involved in supporting professional football in the first place. Especially when those in the league are thumbing their noses at the very taxpayers who are funding them.

Jeff Mordock, writing in the Washington Times, said that

Keep reading…

Tracking Socialist Venezuela’s Death Spiral: 4,000 Percent Inflation

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 22, 2017: 

Português: Brasília - Entrevista do presidente...

Mraxist Hugo Chávez

It took 41,000 bolivars of the Venezuelan currency to purchase a single American dollar on November 1. Three weeks later it took 84,000 bolivars. Back on January 1 Venezuelans could trade just 3,100 bolivars to purchase a dollar. Patrick Gillespie, writing for CNNMoney, did the calculation: Inflation in Venezuela is running at a rate of 4,000 percent a year.

Which explains why Venezuelans are increasingly turning to barter in order to survive. A loaf of bread can be traded for

Keep reading…

Jobless Claims Drop Confirms Economy’s Strength

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 22, 2017: 

The announcement from the Department of Labor on Wednesday masked the remarkable record: the seasonally-adjusted initial claims for unemployment insurance filed by workers following a job loss during the week ending November 18 — 239,000 — are approaching levels not seen since the early 1970s when the workforce was much smaller. This is reflected in the unemployment rate — 4.1 percent — the lowest rate seen in 17 years.

What’s more remarkable is

Keep reading…

Trump Expands List of Potential Supreme Court Nominees in Anticipation of Another Vacancy

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, November 20, 2017:

With the addition of another five nominees to his list of conservative judges, President Trump now has 25 people to consider as soon as another vacancy opens on the bench of the Supreme Court. That could happen soon as rumors persist that Justice Anthony Kennedy, age 81, is considering retiring at the end of the court’s present term. In addition, two liberals are deep into their dotage: Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 84 while Stephen Breyer is 79.

Given the opportunity, Trump’s picks would likely influence legal jurisprudence in the country for decades if not generations. On Friday the president added two appellate judges who were nominated by him earlier this year and confirmed by the Senate:

Keep reading…

Conference Board: Full Speed Ahead for the U.S. Economy

Zoom in on 2000s

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, November 20, 2017:

The Conference Board, a global economic analytics firm that tries to look ahead, has just issued an “all clear, full speed ahead” signal for the U.S. economy. Its three primary indicators — the leading, the coincident, and the lagging — were all up in October, following gains in previous months. Exclaimed Ataman Ozyildirim, director of research, “The U.S. LEI [Leading Economic Index] increased sharply in October, as the impact of the hurricanes dissipated. The growth of the LEI, coupled with widespread strengths among its components, suggests that solid growth in the U.S. economy will continue through the holiday season and into the New Year.”

What’s most surprising is that every one of the 10 components of the LEI were up in October. There wasn’t a single warning signal from any of them:

Keep reading…

“Trump’s” Stock Rally Best Since 1945

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 8, 2017: 

Before the market opened on the day after Donald Trump won the election a year ago, futures were predicting a precipitous drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average of 900 points. By the close of business that day, sentiment reversed and the market closed up 250 points, to 18,500.

That was 5,000 points ago,

Keep reading…

U.S. Economy Continues to Surprise to the Upside

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, October 31, 2017: 

One measure of how the U.S. economy continues to exceed expectations is the Economic Surprise Index published by Citigroup. It’s a tool that is used to measure how the economy compares to those expectations and, at the moment at least, it reflects the ebullience reported elsewhere. Any reading above zero indicates that the economy’s performance is exceeding projections. On Tuesday it hit 40 — its highest level since April.

That performance has repeatedly been reported in The New American and elsewhere, with these notable results:

Keep reading…

Looking a Gift Horse in the Mouth: Pence, Trump to cut UN Funding, give it to USAID Instead

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, October 30, 2017: 

US National Security Memorandum: paramount imp...

First attributed to St. Jerome (400 AD) is “Noli equi dentes inspirere donati” which, roughly translated, means: Don’t look too closely at a gift you received for you might be disappointed. Just be grateful you got the gift. That’s how those supporting the movement to “Get the US out of the UN, and the UN out of the United States” must feel hearing VP Mike Pence speak last Wednesday night. He was addressing the Solidarity Dinner sponsored by In Defense of Christians in Washington, D.C. when he announced that the Trump administration was going to be cutting funding to the United Nations:

Keep reading…

U.S. Economy Powers Through Hurricanes, Beats Forecasts With Three-percent Growth in Third Quarter

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, October 27, 2017:  

Putting in its best six-month performance in three years, the U.S. economy barely skipped a beat in the third quarter, growing at a three-percent annual rate. That was just slightly behind the second quarter, which grew at 3.1 percent, but way ahead of economists who had forecast growth for the third quarter at just 2.5 percent.

The Commerce Department said

Keep reading…

This Thoroughbred is Just Beginning to Feel His Oats

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, October 20, 2017:

English: Thoroughbred racing at Churchill Down...

Thoroughbred racing at Churchill Downs.

It’s tempting to push the analogy comparing the U.S. economy to a Thoroughbred horse too far. But it is tempting. The Thoroughbred breed began around the time of the Industrial Revolution, when an English mare was crossbred with an imported Oriental stallion with Arabian, Barb, and Turkoman breeding. All Thoroughbreds can trace their pedigrees to three stallions imported into England in the 17th century. They were exported to Australia, Europe, Japan, and South America during the 19th century, and today an estimated 100,000 Thoroughbred foals are registered worldwide every year.

A Thoroughbred is tall, slender, athletic, and built for competition, usually on racetracks. Among the most famous are Citation, Phar Lap, Old Rosebud, Whirlaway, Roamer, Seabiscuit, and Man o’ War.

And, of course, the United States economy.

Starting at around 1800, the U.S. economy grew at such a rate that

Keep reading…

Dow Crosses 23,000 for the First Time in History

Performance of the Dow Jones Industrial Index ...

Performance of the Dow Jones Industrial Index during Black Monday

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, October 17, 2017:

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), colloquially called “The Dow,” crossed over the 23,000 benchmark level early Tuesday morning for the first time in history. The Dow, which tracks the stocks of 30 major corporations, has gained 25 percent since the election while the NASDAQ (which tracks the stock performance of a vastly larger and more diversified range of companies across the globe) is up 27 percent. The S&P 500 Index (which tracks the stock performance of 500 American companies) is up 19 percent.

The Wall Street Journal had no trouble finding money managers who were willing to comment positively on the news. Mark Freeman, chief investment officer and portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group (which invests $22 billion for its customers), told the Journal:

Keep reading…

Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.