Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Category Archives: Economics

IEA: United States to Dominate World Energy Market Within Eight Years

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 15, 2017:

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), the growth of energy production in the United States, doubling as it has in just the last eight years, is expected to double again in the next eight. Authors of the IEA’s annual World Energy Outlook report released on Tuesday could hardly contain their surprise: “A remarkable ability to unlock new resources cost-effectively pushes combined United States oil and gas output to a level 50% higher than any other country ever managed; already a net exporter of [natural] gas, the U.S. becomes a net exporter of oil in the late 2020s. In our projections … the rise in US tight oil output [fracking] from 2010 to 2025 would match the highest maintained period of oil output growth by a single country in the history of oil markets.”

The U.S. production increase makes up an astonishing

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Venezuela in Default; Can the U.S. Be Far Behind?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, November 15, 2017:

Português: Brasília - O chanceler da Venezuela...

Marxist Dictator Nicolas Maduro

Marxist Dictator Nicolas Maduro’s Venezuela owes the world an estimated $140 billion. It’s greatly diminished economy, thanks to his socialist policies, generates barely $400 billion in output. That puts its debt-to-GDP ratio at 35 percent.

The United States government, if government agencies are to be believed,

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Where Will 50,000 Former Deutsche Bank Employees Find Work?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, November 10, 2017:

The short answer is: they will find other work. They will also find that other work to be more rewarding, higher paying, more satisfying, and providing greater benefits to others than they did while working for the bank. That’s how the free market operates, when it is allowed to.

It’s not that those DB employees didn’t have fair warning. In September, DB’s CEO, John Cryan, hired in 2015 to turn the bank around, told them:

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Germany’s Deutsche Bank to Cut Half lts Employees

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, November 9, 2017: 

John Cryan, the CEO of Deutsche Bank, the world’s 16th largest bank, gave advance warning about the avalanche of pink slips that were coming. In September, without divulging just how many were coming, the blunt-spoken Cryan told Financial Times’ Laura Noonan that it would be a “big number.” On Wednesday he made it much clearer just how big that “number” is going to be: ”We employ 97,000 people. Most big peers [our competition] have more like half that number.”

Cryan went further, targeting just who was going to get the axe: anyone involved in banking processes, working in cubicles, managing customers’ accounts, tracking investors’ positions, filing financial reports — in other words, any job that a human is currently doing that can be done more efficiently by a robot:

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“Trump’s” Stock Rally Best Since 1945

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Wednesday, November 8, 2017: 

Before the market opened on the day after Donald Trump won the election a year ago, futures were predicting a precipitous drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average of 900 points. By the close of business that day, sentiment reversed and the market closed up 250 points, to 18,500.

That was 5,000 points ago,

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Trump’s Establishment Pick for Fed Chair, Jerome Powell, Won’t Rock the Boat

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, November 3, 2017: 

Nothing will change with Trump’s nomination of Powell to head the Fed. He has a strong establishment background and opposed former Congressman Ron Paul’s effort to “Audit the Fed.”

In announcing his pick to replace Federal Reserve Board chair Janet Yellen, President Trump was generous in his praise for Jerome Powell, a present Fed board member:

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The GOP Tax Reform Bill: Sausage-making on the Titanic

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, November 6, 2017:

John Godfrey Saxe. Library of Congress descrip...

John Godfrey Saxe

The oldest attribution isn’t to Otto von Bismarck, the Iron Chancellor of Germany, but to an American poet, John Godfrey Saxe. Back in 1869, he said it best: “Laws, like sausages, cease to inspire in proportion as we know how they are made.”

Imagine, then, making sausages on the deck of the Titanic just after it hit an iceberg on the glassy sea of the North Atlantic in the early morning hours of April 15, 1912. The wonderful smells might have distracted the passengers from the reality that within two hours and forty minutes the unsinkable ship would disappear beneath the surface of the icy waters, taking 1,550 passengers with her.

That picture may be too dramatic for our purposes. But

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The U.S. Economy is Built on Papier-mâché and Politicians’ Promises

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Wednesday, November 1, 2017:

What a perfect definition of the American economy! Papier-mâché is defined as a “composite material consisting of paper pieces of pulp, sometimes reinforced with textiles, bound with an adhesive such as glue, starch, or wallpaper paste.” Add in a dose of political promises that everyone knows cannot be kept – not even close – and we have the American economy.

From a distance it looks pretty good. More than pretty good: to the untrained eye the American economy is setting world records, to wit:

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U.S. Economy Continues to Surprise to the Upside

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, October 31, 2017: 

One measure of how the U.S. economy continues to exceed expectations is the Economic Surprise Index published by Citigroup. It’s a tool that is used to measure how the economy compares to those expectations and, at the moment at least, it reflects the ebullience reported elsewhere. Any reading above zero indicates that the economy’s performance is exceeding projections. On Tuesday it hit 40 — its highest level since April.

That performance has repeatedly been reported in The New American and elsewhere, with these notable results:

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U.S. Economy Powers Through Hurricanes, Beats Forecasts With Three-percent Growth in Third Quarter

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Friday, October 27, 2017:  

Putting in its best six-month performance in three years, the U.S. economy barely skipped a beat in the third quarter, growing at a three-percent annual rate. That was just slightly behind the second quarter, which grew at 3.1 percent, but way ahead of economists who had forecast growth for the third quarter at just 2.5 percent.

The Commerce Department said

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Aramco CEO Not Worried About American Frackers

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, October 26, 2017:

English: Headquarters of Aramco Services Company

Headquarters of Aramco Services Company

Saudi Aramco CEO Armin Nasser told CNBC’s Squawk Box on Sunday that he wasn’t at all worried about American frackers, since they are concentrating on “sweet spots” — the richest fields with the highest returns — which can’t last forever: “The concentration that we are seeing today [by American frackers] is on the sweet spot of shale, and this will not last forever. You can concentrate for some time on the sweet spots and produce more oil. But ultimately you need to venture downward, and that’s where you have less quality and you require more cost to produce these barrels. Shale oil will contribute additional barrels [to world crude oil supplies], but it will all depend on the price of crude.”

Nasser no doubt was referring to data released last week that showed

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Aramco’s CEO Tells Half a Truth

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, October 27, 2017: 

Carbon print of Alfred Lord Tennyson, 1869, pr...

Alfred Lord Tennyson, 1869

A Yiddish proverb holds that “a half-truth is a whole lie,” while Ann Landers said that “the naked truth is always better than the best-dressed lie.” Alfred Lord Tennyson said it best: “A lie which is half a truth is ever the blackest of lies.”

Whether Aramco’s CEO intended to tell a lie or just wasn’t completely forthright remains unknown. What Armin Nasser did tell CBNC’s “Squawk Box” on Sunday certainly wasn’t the whole picture. He blew off America’s energy frackers:

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Treasury Department: $666 Billion Deficit; Sixth-highest in History

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, October 23, 2017:  

The federal government ran a deficit of $666 billion in 2017, reported the U.S. Treasury Department on Thursday, thanks mainly to increases in budget items that supposedly can’t be cut: Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, and interest on the national debt. In addition, military spending is due for substantial increases under the Trump administration.

Translation:

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Herb Stein, Meet Mick Mulvaney

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, October 23, 2017: 

English: Official portrait of US Rep. Mick Mul...

Mick Mulvaney

University of Virginia professor Herbert Stein, the father of Ben Stein of Ferris Bueller fame, was known as a pragmatic conservative. But he is best known for his cryptic expression, “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.”

Mick Mulvaney’s hopeful outlook hasn’t yet been tarnished by his experience in Washington. Serving as a member of the House of Representatives from South Carolina prior to accepting the position of President Trump’s Director of Office of Management and Budget, Mulvaney really thinks, based on his public statements, that things really can go on forever. All that is needed is a little tweaking: “We need to grow our economy again and get our fiscal house in order. We can do that through smart spending restraint, tax reform, and cutting red tape.”

A closer look at the size of that fiscal deficit, however, reveals Mr. Mulvaney’s naiveté: on Thursday the Treasury Department announced that the deficit for the fiscal year that ended on September 30 was

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This Thoroughbred is Just Beginning to Feel His Oats

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Friday, October 20, 2017:

English: Thoroughbred racing at Churchill Down...

Thoroughbred racing at Churchill Downs.

It’s tempting to push the analogy comparing the U.S. economy to a Thoroughbred horse too far. But it is tempting. The Thoroughbred breed began around the time of the Industrial Revolution, when an English mare was crossbred with an imported Oriental stallion with Arabian, Barb, and Turkoman breeding. All Thoroughbreds can trace their pedigrees to three stallions imported into England in the 17th century. They were exported to Australia, Europe, Japan, and South America during the 19th century, and today an estimated 100,000 Thoroughbred foals are registered worldwide every year.

A Thoroughbred is tall, slender, athletic, and built for competition, usually on racetracks. Among the most famous are Citation, Phar Lap, Old Rosebud, Whirlaway, Roamer, Seabiscuit, and Man o’ War.

And, of course, the United States economy.

Starting at around 1800, the U.S. economy grew at such a rate that

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Many Surprises in Latest Jobless Claims Report

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Thursday, October 19, 2017:

The first surprise from the latest jobless claims statistics is that new claims for unemployment insurance benefits last week fell to the lowest level in 44 years, according to the Department of Labor (DOL): “The advance figure … was 222,000 … the lowest level for initial claims since March 31, 1973.”

The second surprise is that the number of continuing claims (those lasting more than a week) also fell to levels not seen since 1974.

The third surprise is

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Dow Crosses 23,000 for the First Time in History

Performance of the Dow Jones Industrial Index ...

Performance of the Dow Jones Industrial Index during Black Monday

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Tuesday, October 17, 2017:

The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), colloquially called “The Dow,” crossed over the 23,000 benchmark level early Tuesday morning for the first time in history. The Dow, which tracks the stocks of 30 major corporations, has gained 25 percent since the election while the NASDAQ (which tracks the stock performance of a vastly larger and more diversified range of companies across the globe) is up 27 percent. The S&P 500 Index (which tracks the stock performance of 500 American companies) is up 19 percent.

The Wall Street Journal had no trouble finding money managers who were willing to comment positively on the news. Mark Freeman, chief investment officer and portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings Group (which invests $22 billion for its customers), told the Journal:

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What if Your Customer Can’t Buy Your Product, but Wants to?

This article was published by The McAlvany Intelligence Advisor on Monday, October 16, 2017:

There are two basic rules of economics. The first is: if prices go down, more will be demanded. The second is: both sides of any economic transaction must benefit or there’s no deal.

The fracking revolution in the United States has pushed the price of crude oil down to the point where it is threatening the very existence of the OPEC cartel. Consumers are saving at the pump and the energy industry in the U.S. employs more than 10 million people, making up eight percent of the country’s gross domestic product.

But there’s been an all but invisible transformation taking place in natural gas. At least two of the Big Oil companies sell more natural gas than they do crude oil.

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U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Add 500,000 Jobs, $73 Billion to Economy

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, October 16, 2017:

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) tanker, section vi...

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) tanker, section view from side.

The latest estimate from API, the energy trade group, is that increased exports of LNG (liquefied natural gas) over the next 20 years will add nearly 500,000 jobs to the American economy and $73 billion to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). Marty Durbin, API’s chief strategy officer, stated, “This report confirms that increasing U.S. LNG exports would bring great benefits to American workers and consumers and [to] the U.S. economy. Increasing the use of U.S. natural gas throughout the world means more production here at home, cleaner air, and increased energy security for our nation and our allies.”

The revolution taking place in natural gas has been almost completely overlooked.

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EV Revolution to Drive Oil to $10 a Barrel, Says Forecaster

This article appeared online at TheNewAmerican.com on Monday, October 16, 2017:

Shell Oil Company

Chris Watling, the CEO of Longview Economics, told CNBC on Friday that Saudi Arabia should hasten the sale of part of its Aramco oil company while the price of crude is still high: “I think they need to get it away quick before oil goes to $10 [per barrel].” Added Watling: “We forget, don’t we? 120 years ago the world didn’t live on oil. Oil hasn’t always driven the global economy. The point is, alternative energy in some form is gathering speed.… Things are changing.”

Watling’s views coincide with those of Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) in their just-released 2017 Long Term Electric Vehicle Outlook, which concluded that by 2040

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Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.