Have nothing to do with the [evil] things that people do, things that belong to the darkness. Instead, bring them out to the light... [For] when all things are brought out into the light, then their true nature is clearly revealed...

-Ephesians 5:11-13

Category Archives: Constitution

Private Contractors Feeding at the Public Trough

The latest ranking of contractors providing services to the federal government reveals that at least nine of the top 10 are tied to the Department of Defense and took in nearly $70 billion of the government’s money in 2010. Leading the pack as it has for the past 17 years is Lockheed Martin, with $17 billion, followed by Northrop Grumman, Boeing, Raytheon, and General Dynamics.

The top 27 contractors each received at least $1 billion in contracts from the government last year, with Number 100 on the list, Teledyne, getting $170 million. This reflects the enormous growth of government spending in general, and on outside vendors in particular, growing from $207 billion in 2000 to

Keep reading…

Nine of 12 Super Committee Members Named: Tea Party Marginalized

May_30_Health_Care_Rally_NP (207)

Image by seiuhealthcare775nw via Flickr

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was the first to announce his three nominees to the “Super Committee” created by the recent debt ceiling increase, and all three fit the mold of big-spending liberals: Senators John Kerry (D-Mass.), Max Baucus (D-Mont.), and Patty Murray (D-Wash, right.), the latter of whom will also serve as co-chairman of the committee. Reid observed of his picks:

Keep reading…

FTC Probes Google in Fishing Expedition

Google 的貼牌冰箱(Google refrigerator)

Image by Aray Chen via Flickr

Google announced on its blog on June 24th that the Federal Trade Commission had launched “a review of our business. We respect the FTC’s process and will be working with them over the coming months to answer questions about Google and our services. ” But Google doesn’t know what the FTC is looking for:

Keep reading…

Is the Debt Ceiling Unconstitutional?

Charles Evans Hughes (1862 - 1948), lawyer and...

Image via Wikipedia

If the current debt ceiling negotiations fail in time to avoid the drop-dead default date of August 2, liberal law professor Garrett Epps has the answer for President Obama: Ignore the ceiling and keep on spending.

He even has a speech for the President ready to go:

Keep reading…

Pentagon: Cyberattack an Act of War

Matrix Code

Image by My Melting Brain via Flickr

Following up on the publication of the “International Strategy for Cyberspace” by the Obama administration last month, the Pentagon clarified and expanded upon its intention to consider a computer attack as equivalent to a more traditional act of war.

The White House’s strategy made clear that:

Keep reading…

What’s Wrong with Insider Trading? Ask Raj Rajaratnam

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 12:  Billionaire Galleon ...

Image by Getty Images via @daylife

When Raj Rajaratnam, founder of Galleon Management, was convicted on all 14 counts of insider trading earlier this month, it made the phones ring in lawyers’ offices all across the country. Rajaratnam was only one of 47 people charged but he was by far the biggest fish caught in the net set by United States attorney for Manhattan, Preet Bharara. It took Bharara’s office 9 months of wire-tapping Rajaratnam’s phone, and 18 months of additional investigative work to get the convictions, and Bharara was ecstatic: “The message today is clear–there are rules and there are laws, and they apply to everyone, no matter who you are or how much money you have.”

Keep reading…

Federal Red Ink Forever

Deputy Secretary of State for Management and R...

Image via Wikipedia

When the Congressional Budget Office’s preliminary analysis of the Obama Administration’s 2012 budget was announced last week, observers were shocked—shocked!—to learn that deficits over the next 10 years would be nearly $10 trillion, almost $2½ trillion more than the administration’s estimate.

The CBO had to modify many of the administration’s assumptions, and address at least one major error, in order to come up with its conclusion. First, the CBO assumed that the economy wouldn’t rebound nearly as strongly as projected by

Keep reading…

Supreme Court: Corporations Are Persons without Personal Privacy

The current United States Supreme Court, the h...

Image via Wikipedia

When the Supreme Court was given the opportunity to extend the realm of privacy for corporations, it failed, 8-0. The case of FCC v. AT&T, which began nearly seven years ago, concerned a malfeasance by AT&T and schools in New London, Connecticut, and was resolved, briefly, by the payment of a fine to the FCC.

In 2005, however, CompTel, a trade association made up of some of AT&T’s competitors, petitioned the FCC under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to release the information they had gathered in the course of the investigation. The obvious purpose was to

Keep reading…

Bill of Rights Slows Government Probe of WikiLeaks

Julian Assange

Image by Poster Boy NYC via Flickr

On Tuesday, the quiet subterranean fishing expedition by the government into the WikiLeaks document disclosures last fall came to light for the first time in the courtroom of U. S. Magistrate Judge Theresa Carroll Buchanan in Alexandria, Virginia. In its search for incriminating evidence, the government demanded that Twitter release information about three suspects linked to WikiLeaks’ founder Julian Assange:

Keep reading…

Kagan, Sotomayor, Ginsburg, and the 4th Amendment

Stylized arrest.

Image via Wikipedia

When the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments on a Fourth Amendment case decided by the Kentucky Supreme Court (Kentucky v. King), alarm bells went off. Under the Fourth Amendment, as readers are no doubt aware, “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

But what if police pick the wrong house, pound on the door loudly, announce that “This is the police!” and then, smelling pot, break down the door without a warrant and arrest the homeowner for violating local drug laws?

Keep reading…

Freedom of Information Act: Shield or Bludgeon?

Look, it's AT&T!

Image by fordsbasement via Flickr

The Supreme Court is about to hear arguments in the case of FCC v. AT&T which could have significant negative impacts on privately-held companies as well as public and private corporations.

It began in 2004 when AT&T discovered that it might have overcharged the federal government for some work it was doing under the E-Rate program (to bring technology to classrooms) in New London, Connecticut. When it notified the FCC of the possible over-billing, the FCC launched a full investigation, requiring (and receiving) all manner of

Keep reading…

Corporation for Public Broadcasting: Trim, or Uproot?

Doug Lamborn

Image via Wikipedia

When Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) introduced a bill in the 111th Congress to defund National Public Radio (NPR), two things were working against him: the overwhelming collectivist mindset of that Congress itself, and the fact that NPR hadn’t yet embarrassed itself sufficiently to build public opinion against the agency. In light of NPR’s series of gaffes since then, as well as the more conservative tone of the new 112th Congress, Lamborn has decided to try again.

He observed:

Keep reading…

FCC Ruling is Irrelevant

Internet Map. Ninian Smart predicts global com...

Image via Wikipedia

There have been sighs of despair and much hand-wringing coming from observers of the latest attempt by the FCC to intervene in the operations of the Internet. The noisiest came from one of the two commissioners who voted against the ruling, Robert McDowell.

Despite a court ruling earlier this year which limited the FCC’s jurisdiction over the Internet, and Congressional pressure to leave well enough alone, McDowell warned that the FCC’s decision yesterday is “likely to have the perverse effect of inhibiting capital investment, deterring innovation, raising operating costs, and ultimately increasing consumer prices.” He concluded that this decision “may end up marking the beginning of a long winter’s night for Internet freedom.”

Keep reading…

Top Secret America: Expensive, Chaotic and Dangerous

Headquarters of the NSA at Fort Meade, Maryland.

Image via Wikipedia

Last July the Washington Post published a three-part story on “the huge security buildup in the United States after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.” This week, the Post published “Monitoring America,” the fourth installment of its “Top Secret America” series, describing security efforts at the local level.

After two years of research, hundreds of interviews, and thousands of hours poring over documents, the Washington Post investigation was unable to determine anything for sure—except, of course, that the security system is massive:

Keep reading…

WikiLeaks: Asking the Right Questions

Julian Assange (2)

Image by bbwbryant via Flickr

Nearly everyone with an internet connection knows the website WikiLeaks.org to be the notorious publisher of inconvenient truths about the secret machinations of government and military operations. Scarcely fewer know that the founder, Julian Assange, was arrested last week in London. Only a few are asking the right questions.

In an interview in April, Assange was quite forthright about his intentions. He said:

Keep reading…

Judge Porteous is History

Derecho

Image via Wikipedia

Federal Judge Thomas Porteous is only the eighth federal judge to be impeached, convicted, and removed from office since the founding of the Republic. And for a while there, the decision appeared to be too close to call.

The four articles of impeachment passed the House unanimously earlier this year before the Senate considered the case. Each article, by itself, appeared to be weak, according to attorney David O. Stewart.

Keep reading…

Smithsonian Exhibit Outrage: Asking the Wrong Questions

The Smithsonian Castle in Washington, D.C.

Image via Wikipedia

Although the “Hide/Seek” exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution opened on October 30th, it didn’t start generating national outrage until CNS News published a lengthy and detailed review on Monday. In that review, astonishing and outrageous videos, paintings, photographs and montages by gay and lesbian artists were displayed, including “an ant-covered Jesus, male genitals, naked brothers kissing, men in chains, Ellen DeGeneres grabbing her breasts, and a painting the Smithsonian itself describes in the show’s catalog as ‘homoerotic.’ ”

The historian and co-curator of the exhibit David Ward tried to explain away the reasons behind the exhibit:

Keep reading…

Is Everything “Commerce?”

Chief Justice John Marshall established a broa...

Image via Wikipedia

Law professor Robert Natelson wrote that because Congress has stretched its definition of “commerce” so far beyond that originally intended by the founders, “it is up to the people to recall the federal government to its constitutional limits.” Known as the “Commerce power,” Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution says that “the Congress shall have Power…to regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several states.”

And up until 1937, that power had been relatively tightly construed to mean what the Founders intended: to regulate trade—the buying and selling across state lines. By using false arguments, however, the Supreme Court during Roosevelt’s New Deal ruled in general that Congress was free to “control manufacturing, wages, agriculture, crime, mining, land use, firearm possession, and a [wide] range of other activities.”

Keep reading…

Removing “Technical” Obstacles to Surveillance

Navstar-2F satellite of the Global Positioning...

Image via Wikipedia

Buried in an otherwise innocuous-appearing article in the New York Times about wiretapping was this chilling sentence: “The issue [of surveillance of individuals by law enforcement agencies] has added importance because [these technologies] developed by the United States to hunt for terrorists and drug traffickers can also be used by repressive regimes to hunt for political dissidents” [emphasis added].

Keep reading…

Chinese “Dissident” Echoes US Founding, Receives Nobel Peace Prize

Liu Xiaobo

Image via Wikipedia

Liu Xiaobo, co-author of “Charter 08,” was arrested two days before that freedom manifesto was published on December 10, 2008, and was finally sentenced on Christmas Day 2009 to 11 years in prison for “inciting subversion of state power.” Late last week he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his trouble.

Nobel committee chairman Thorbjorn Jagland made the official announcement:

Keep reading…

Many of the articles on Light from the Right first appeared on either The New American or the McAlvany Intelligence Advisor.
Copyright © 2018 Bob Adelmann